Pyr question

Discussion in 'Sheep' started by Snomama, Jan 17, 2005.

  1. Snomama

    Snomama Well-Known Member

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    Hello, it's me again with another question about my pyr :rolleyes:

    I have been reading all the other LGD posts and I think there are some on here now that can answer my question.

    We have a female pyr that is 15mo old. She has been really wonderful BUT...(you knew that was coming huh?) she does want to play with the babies. AND we did have a very destructive ram that thought it was fun to entice her to "play" so today I saw her trying to "play" with my ewes.

    What do I do about these two problems???

    First of all you need to know that I began all wrong and she was in the house her first several months after we got her. Then when she went outside she decided to sleep on the back porch no matter how many times we put her into the sheep fence she would find a way out. She does a FANTASTIC job keeping the coyotes away (TONS of those near our farm, they howl every night) and has even chased a bobcat out of the sheep fence. Just recently she has begun to sleep next to the gate of the corral we have around our sheep shed, keeping all the sheep inside and everything away from them as the coyotes has been really persistant lately. One night she stayed up barking around the perimiter in a freezing rain for over two hours. She had icicles hanging off her the next morning and in a few days a good respiratory infection.

    So....we really do love our pyr, but having started out all wrong, what can we do to help her out? I know she is very smart b/c she does things we never thought of her doing. She knows how to separate and herd! How's that? We got a few new goats and then decided to do take the kids from the nanny after having already put them in with our other goats. We just said, help us out Snobelle, and she herded the new ones into the barn! Couldn't believe it!

    PS...the one raising the anatolian mixes, what is your website again??? I am interested in crossing the breeds as I have heard so much good about it and I am keeping a female and doing her the right way....in with the sheep and goats IMEDIATELY!
     
  2. quailkeeper

    quailkeeper Well-Known Member

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    I will have some anatolian/gp pups in about three and a half months. :haha: I can't wait!!
     

  3. Snomama

    Snomama Well-Known Member

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    HEY.............WHERE ARE ALL THE LGD OWNERS?????

    Just wondering :cool:

    We plan on breeding our pyr this fall, she will two then and have all her tests, ect. There is a pyr kennel about an hour from us where she has been specializing in raising pyrs as LGD for 20 years so we are going to use one of her studs. Hopeing for great puppies ;)

    I am definitely interested in an anatolian shepherd for breeding too though.

    I mostly need help right now *HINT*HINT* :worship:
     
  4. marvella

    marvella Well-Known Member

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    i've got a pyr, but don't know flip about sheep. to tell the truth, i'm not sure what you are asking. what do you mean by she plays with them? is she really playing? or hurting them? if playing, i don't see a real reason to stop her. she's still young. or is she teaching them who is boss? even my buck minds howard. (my pyr)

    i mostly find that i just leave howard alone, to do what he does best. he thinks i'm stupid anyway.:)

    one time, i had a sick pig that had been in the house. when i was trying to transition the pig outside, i let her get under the house. it took weeks to get her out of there because the dog thought the pig belonged under the house, where i put her. everytime the pig came out, the dog made her go back in. :haha: i had a devil of a time making the dog let the pig out. he KNEW that pig belonged under there and he meant for the pig to stay. :)
     
  5. inc

    inc Well-Known Member

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    my that was a pig in a poke
     
  6. mawalla

    mawalla Well-Known Member

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    Define "plays".
     
  7. Lisa in WA

    Lisa in WA Formerly LisainN.Idaho Supporter

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    I have a 15 month old male Pyr, and like his older brothers, he gets excited with the sheep sometimes. Doesn't touch them, just "romps" with them..you know, front end on the ground, butt up in the air, tail wagging and trying to get them to play. Just puppy stuff. The older boys did this too, but can't be bothered now.
     
  8. Ark

    Ark Well-Known Member

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    Snomama, your name sounds so familiar! Did you used to visit the Titus2 Moms Board before they closed it down??

    We have a 9 month old Anatolian that I DESPAIR about! We are waiting for him to outgrow his puppy stage so that he can be trusted with the goats and sheep.

    He is SO rambunctious, and does not have a mean bone in his body, but he wants to "play" with the goats. He jumps on them and chases them, and generally pesters the heck out of them.

    I dont know if he will ever quit. :no:

    He stays in a pen by himself most of the time. Once a day I lock up all the goats and sheep so that he can get out to run and play with our terrier for several hours. Anywhere from 2 to 4 hours. Then he has to go back to his large pen.

    Ark (Rachel)
     
  9. Sue

    Sue Well-Known Member

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    We have two Pyrs and one Anatolian. Although all three are good guard dogs, the Anatolian has taken MUCH longer to mature. Our neighbors have expressed the same problem with their Anatolian so it must be a breed thing as she is unrelated to ours. Have to say, the next LGD will have to be a Pyr.

    They all go through a "play" stage as pups and young dogs. The key is to catch them in the act and reprimand such behavior but most definitely, leave them with the sheep or they never will get over it.
     
  10. Ark

    Ark Well-Known Member

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    Hi Sue, the problem is that Jackson is FAST and cannot be caught to be reprimanded. Chasing him is not a good idea either as he thinks it's a game. He always comes up for attention unless he thinks he is in trouble. If he tackles a goat and I say NO! he runs off to the next goat. He has never drawn blood, thank goodness!
    But, we pen him up because you can't just leave a dog with the goats when you have no way of reprimanding him.
    I wish there was a better option.
    Rachel
     
  11. Sue

    Sue Well-Known Member

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    Ok Rachel, you have to be FASTER! Since he is locked up away from the goats, is it easy to assume as soon as you put him in with the goats that he is going to chase? If so, put a very long rope on him and go for a walk in the goat pen. As soon as he starts to chase, give him a swift jerk and scold him harshly with your voice. Continue these training sessions until he listens off line. Timing is everything here. It's basic dog training 101 ~ never let them win or you are reinforcing the negative behavior. You also want to praise him on your walks when he is being good and not going after them.

    Possibly the reason he continues to chase is that he is penned away from the goats and just is so excited to see them when he does get to go in so this is a patterned bad behavior.
     
  12. Ark

    Ark Well-Known Member

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    yes, for sure he will chase immediately.

    I am so dumb! Why didn't I think of that??????? :eek:

    Yes, that sounds like that's it EXACTLY. He does get excited to be with them, although he can often see them if they are near his pen.
    Thankyou for the idea - I am really excited to try it. I hate locking him up when he could have 10 acres to run around on and exercise. He loves to play with our tiny little terrier Bullet. They look like David and Goliath when they are together. :haha:

    I am going out to give him a training session right now!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Thankyou!
    Rachel
     
  13. Sue

    Sue Well-Known Member

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    I am happy about your excitement. Please remember to stay calm and limit training sessions to 15 minutes maximum the first few days. A couple training sessions per day is ok. As he does better, allow more training time ~ after all, you are attempting to get him to live with them! Once he understands that playing with the goats is unacceptable, allow him freedom in the pen when you are working around outside so you can keep tabs on what is happening.

    If you have a billy that won't tolerate his "play" ~ the billy may teach him everything he needs to know . . .
     
  14. mawalla

    mawalla Well-Known Member

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    To keep my Pyr from chasing the sheep when he was a pup I put a chain on his collar that reached to the ground. I had about a 2ft long 2 X 4 attached to it at the board's center. When the pup would run he would trip himself or wack himself with the board. I reinforced the punishment with a stern "NO". He learned not to chase and he learned the command "NO". He is now a frisky 2 year old and becoming a pretty good dog. Far from perfect, mind you, but doing a pretty good job of keeping unwanted critters away from my flock.
     
  15. Ark

    Ark Well-Known Member

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    Thanks mawalla, we may try that if this other thing doesn't work.

    Sue, I took him out for about 10 minutes yesterday and he was SO rambunctious I could barely hold him to get the rope on the collar.

    So, today I will let him out for his playtime FIRST to get rid of all excess energy and then put the rope on and let the goats back out. I wish I knew how much he weighed. He is just huge and seems to be still growing. I have a permanently messed up knee from him slamming into me while he was romping with Bullet.

    Thanks!!!
     
  16. Ark

    Ark Well-Known Member

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    PS - no billies around here, except a tiny little Nigerian Dwarf that we are leasing. He runs from Jackson!
     
  17. Shahbazin

    Shahbazin Well-Known Member

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    15 months is still young enough to be goofy. Can you yell at her & roll her? Or does she just think it's part of the "game"? Sometimes, if you do some obedience training practice with them once a day, they listen better even if they are way out in the field (Yell at her to quit pestering the flock, then praise her when she quits messing around). Other thoughts include a dangle stick, or an electronic training collar.
     
  18. marvella

    marvella Well-Known Member

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    now i'm wondering where snomama went. she sounded desperate for help, but never came back. :confused:
     
  19. becky4050

    becky4050 Member

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    We have two pyrs that are now about 10 years old. Thor was raised with the sheep from the time we brought him home but he still liked to "play" with them sometimes. He just seemed to outgrow the behavior and never hurt anyone. Getting a second pyr(from the animal shelter!) to be with him seemed to make him really happy, too - sheep aren't very intelligent company and another dog to hang around with and work with was great. The one problem I had with him when he was a pup was that, if a ewe lambed and I didn't have her in a lambing pen, he would drag her away from the lambs by the ear and not let her near them. He also was incredibly good at finding ways to get inside lambing pens (climbing over gates, etc.) just to be near the babies. We have some pretty funny pics of him hanging over the pen looking at the lambs. We don't have sheep anymore but if I have anything to do with it, we will always have pyrs!
     
  20. Snomama

    Snomama Well-Known Member

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    Oh Thank you so very much for the wonderful ideas!

    Our computer died :waa:

    yes, I was on the Titus2 board :cool: Good to "see" you!

    Okay......our dog is truly wonderful, I think she is just wanting someone to "play" with as she is in a playing stance and the ram started it all with his stamping around ect. she thought he wanted to play :no: THEN we have the young goats who are having a grand time jumping and playing and I know she thought she would just "join" them but no one else was having fun! The poor kids just panicked! (I would too if I was only 30 lbs and a 100lb lug came running at me!)

    Now, if I clap my hands and yell "Get out" she immediately leaves the area, gets out of the sheep or goat fence so getting her to stop is not a problem. I just don't want her to do it if we aren't here, I want her to get the message it is ALWAYS a no-no. I really am thinking she will outgrow it, or hoping so anyway.

    We are talking about a shock collar to get her roaming under control. She always stayed here on our place or on the land right beside, but in chasing the coyotes to the woods several times I think the woods have begun to intrigue her. I saw her run off into them this afternoon and she went quite far. I am afraid of something happening to her or someone else bothering her.

    Thanks again for the advice. I am going to try training sessions with my sheep AND goats. AND we are hoping to get another pyr for her, maybe even this month. I think she needs a friend too! She is very smart and the sheep and goats just don't offer much in the area of stimulation :rolleyes: