Pygmy and nigerian fencing question!

Discussion in 'Goats' started by trob1, Sep 9, 2006.

  1. trob1

    trob1 Well-Known Member

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    Ok all you pygmy and nigerian breeders. I am about to have my fencing done. We are fencing in almost 3 acres for my pygmy goats. We have gotten prices and if we go with horse fencing which is the 2"x4" rectangles that is the highest price at $5.25 a foot with all wood post and .80 cents cheaper with t-post and wood post in corners. Now for almost half the price I can get goat fencing which is 4" x 4" squares . Now I breed my goats and last year my kidding stalls were made from goat panels that have 4" x 4" opening and 2 of my babies could go right thru them. Now with in a week they couldnt and I don't even think they left the barn for almost a week.

    Now what type of fencing do most of you mini people have? If you had the choice to do your fencing now what would you go with the horse or the goat fencing? Also is there any advantage to going with all wood post over t-post?

    Thanks
     
  2. stacygoats

    stacygoats Well-Known Member

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    I went with t posts the last time and have not had any problems. My original pastures had all wood posts and I've had to replace a couple due to rot, even the treated wood posts rot after awhile.
    Are both the goat and horse fence the same gauge wire and are your pygmy goats climbers/jumpers? I do not have minis but would think the smaller openings would be better, but if it is smaller gauge wire it might be more prone to stretching and getting pushed out of shape (Goats love to rub on the fence if there is no electric fence to keep them off of it.). I had to use field fence (cheaper) which has the larger opening and then added hot wire to keep my goats off the fence and from geting their heads stuck.
     

  3. waygr00vy

    waygr00vy Sunny Daze Farm

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    I have pygmys and nigerians also. My pasture is fenced with the regular field fencing with the larger openings, and wood posts. The wood posts were used because I also have cows and horses. For my smaller goat pens, I used the fecning with the smaller openings. I have had more problems with the field fencing, and if I had to do it over I would have used the fencing with the smaller openings everywhere. Not only can the babies fit through it, if you have any goats with horns, they can get their heads stuck. It is also easier for them to try and fit through and then destroy the fencing in the process. Either fencing type you use though, It would not be a bad idea to add a strand of hot wire. They do rub on both types and this can prevent you from having to make alot of patches and repairs.
     
  4. malickfarms

    malickfarms Well-Known Member

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    i fenced in about 1.5 acres this spring. i used redbrand field fencing. the stays i believe are 9" and total height is 47". the bottom part of fence has the horizontal wires closer (~3") spaced than the top. i used heavy wood corner posts backfilled with peastone and in between are 6' t-posts on 10' centers. i also ran two strands of electric one at the top and one at about 20". i used a 6 volt solar charger (gives a good shock, dont ask how i know :doh: ). i installed it myself it took about 2 days and cost me about 1200 for about a thousand feet. good luck and keep us posted.
     
  5. bill not in oh

    bill not in oh Well-Known Member

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    If by horse fence you are talking about 17 gauge welded wire, it will be a continuing PITA to keep tight and if you get 3-4 years of service out of it with goats, you've done well. I used some to seperate stalls in the barn and the goats tore it apart in 3 months. That being said, this next week I'm replacing the fence (said welded wire) between my chicken runs. I'm going to try an experiment with lessons from high tensile fencing in that I'll use tension springs and ratchet tensioners to keep the fence tight - we'll see....

    If it's a 12-14 gauge woven wire, you will get better service from it, but will still require quite a bit of maintenence.

    Our pygmies do fine behind electric - you have to build it right and train them early, but once they respect the wire they keep back from it. The downside is that they won't graze/browse along the fenceline and you have to keep it trimmed. The upside is 1) very easy and relatively inexpensive to build 2)expect it to last 25 years 3) low maintenence 4) provides good predator control.

    Wood posts -vs- T-posts.... I use both depending on the purpose. With the high tensile fence, I use 8' utility pole sections at the corners (set about 4' deep) with step-in plastic posts for most of the line posts and T-posts where I neet to manipulate the wire because of changes in terrain. With the 2X4 welded wire, I used T-posts exclusively, however with my 'experiment', I'll use the wood posts so I can pull against them with the tensioners.
     
  6. delphinium

    delphinium Well-Known Member

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    I only have a few nigerians and I love the high-5 cattle panel with the 4" squares. Yes, the first week we had a kid walk through, but they usually stick pretty close to momma when they are that new. I use U-posts (heavier duty than T-posts) and leave them set up in a grid and move the panels from section to section, rotating the available forage area. I would love to enclose the entire area with them, just can't afford to, yet.
     
  7. Jillis

    Jillis Well-Known Member

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    Since I have Nigies, I chose to use combo panel, which is similar to cattle panel but the squares at the bottom get smaller and smaller. In the winter, with a snow pack, my little Nigie (about 5 -7 months old while this was going on) used to squeeeeeeeze through the first large square and start helping herself while I was filling the grain troughs. I'd just turn around and there she would be! And then....she started getting stuck around the middle. Took some manuevering to get her back through. Heeheehee.

    Even with the combo panel, my talented Nigie babies would jump up and through the bigger squares if mama was on the other side---just as graceful as you please. So when all the Nigies have babies next Spring and Summer, I plan to put another layer of perhaps welded wire fencing across the bottom half of the fences where they live.

    My combo panels are 5' tall---31.00 for 16'---expensive, but worth it! Very sturdy. We nailed them with fence staples to cedar posts.
     
  8. trob1

    trob1 Well-Known Member

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    The horse fencing and goat fencing I would be using is not welded it is braided and the same guage wire as the field fencing is just with smaller holes that is why it is more expensive.