Putting a Modular in the Country

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by holsteintater, Jul 13, 2005.

  1. holsteintater

    holsteintater Well-Known Member

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    We're currently looking at properties right now and not really finding *the* house. We are going to look into modular homes as I have read their quality beats stick built homes and they're set up fast. If anyone has done this, I have tons of questions for you:

    How long did it take from when you ordered the home till it was fully set up and ready to live in?

    How much did you spent total for the septic, well, etc. and home?

    How satisfied are you with the modular's quality? Any problems? Who was the builder?

    Was the "building" process a pain in the neck with getting the right permits and whatever else needed to be done? Would you recommend this process?

    That's all I can think of now! TIA!!! :)
     
  2. PezzoNovante

    PezzoNovante Well-Known Member

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    Cost should be comparable to a stick built if you want the same quality of construction. At the other extreme you can find a fairly new repo for under $20/sq ft.

    Spetic systems run $3-5K if they are put in sandy soil. Perk tests are required just about everywhere these days. I would suggest getting one done BEFORE deciding on a property.

    Well cost is a function of the geographic area, ask around. Both drillers and recent customers. Hitting water isn't the same as finding a source that is suitable to your needs.

    Strogest set up is placing the home onto concrete footings, either a full basement or perimeter. Doing so will classify the home as permanent -- making it a real property & taxed by the county as opposed to being taxed by the TAG office (speaking from an Oklahoma perspective, but may apply in your area as well.) This will get you a break on insurance.

    Speaking of which, if you are having the home built by the manufacturer, go with a class I roof (highest fire rating) and non-flammable siding such as Hardy Plank (sp?). Getting insurance in the country is difficult, doing whatever you can to make the home insurable is worth the cost.

    Skip the garden tub if possible. We've used ours once. A regular tub won't drain the hot water heater. Put a spa on the deck if you like soaking fun.
     

  3. kppop

    kppop Well-Known Member

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    If at possible tour the factory of where they built..that way you can see what is going into your home. View the models..and really take a good hard look...make sure to ask what is and is not standard on the home. What they show you in the model is usually an upgrade ( $$).

    We have many factories around here and we toured them and weren't at all impressed with the quality of the homes or the quality of the products they were using in the homes. I personally know of 2 families that have had the house literally split in half...one was a ranch and the other is a 2 story job.

    Find ppl in your area who have these homes and ask them how they like them. I personally think that for what you are paying for mod you could build a really nice stick home just as easily.

    Call your local building dept and ask them about putting a mod up..some places wont allow them at all and some places only allow them in certain areas. Now whether or not they hold value it a totally different story. They don't hold value up here. They are worth much much less than a good quality stick built home.

    I think you are doing the right thing by gathering as much info as you can..have you checked any websites? Crest homes is a factory not far from here and so is Dutch housing..check them out.
     
  4. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I see modular home builders in this area that make glorified mobile homes - a double wide with a peaked roof on it - or mod builders that build multi-level 3000 sq ft doctor's mansions - literally.

    So, quality & value are _all_ over the board, do your homework on any builder of any type of construction. I would _not_ use the blanket terms you do to describe any one type of construction.

    Wells & septics depend upon local codes & regulations & soil conditions, either can cost fron $1000 - 25,000. You need to know the very local conditions to determine their cost.

    --->Paul
     
  5. Gary in ohio

    Gary in ohio Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The initial quality of modulars as good as if not bettern than onsite built homes. A modular is still a stick built home in most cases, sometimes metal framed. The factory nature of a modular gives it a higher standard of build. The problem with modular is lack of trim levels, lack of home styles (most are basicly rectangles). There are some 2 story and even saw a victorian looking home. Modular tend to be smaller in size than onsite built homes. Size for size I didnt see a lot of advantage of price once you put all the installation cost into place. I think you also will not get as good a return on your money at relsell time in many markets.

    Modulars, prebuilt homes have come a long way from a double wide trailer.
     
  6. holsteintater

    holsteintater Well-Known Member

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    Thanks so much for hte replies. After these posts and searching this topic on here, I think modular won't be an option for us. I just don't feel comfortable with it having read so many negative things.
     
  7. computerchick

    computerchick Keeper of the Zoo

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    We are in a Foremost - if we had to do it all over again, we would again do a Foremost!

    It is much better made than stick built homes around here - it actually costs a bit more to do it that way now (modular) than stickbuilt, but the quality is totally worth it!

    We have a Cape Cod with full basement. We purchased it already here, however the previous owner gave us a lot of info - let me know if you'd like some!

    Andrea
     
  8. sullen

    sullen Question Answerer

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    I have one too, but it is a basic model. Lots of taking down and replacing in my future. On the up side, I found my perfect piece of land and was living here 6 months later, thanks to a modular house. Saved us from renting. That won't happen with a stick built.
    We got a guy who buys the land for you, then puts the house on it and you buy it from him. He did everything. We spent a lot of time at the site making sure they did things right.
    But the cost is comparable to a new house, concidering you are starting from scratch.
     
  9. bugstabber

    bugstabber Chief cook & weed puller Supporter

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    I'm wondering if you are all talking about different things. I thought a modular home was the type that is built off site and hauled to your place, sometimes in sections. Around here you put it on a basement, or a slab if the water table is too high. Manufactured home is a trailer house.
     
  10. mtman

    mtman Well-Known Member

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    bugstabber you are right there is a differance a mod. is brought in and put together on site a manufactured is nothing more then a double wide with some sheet rock in it
     
  11. cloverfarm

    cloverfarm Well-Known Member

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    We have a modular set on a full basement. It was built in a local shop and we were welcome to come in and check it out any time during construction. It was brought out in two halves, set on the foundation, then the roof, garage and front porch were added. We thought we got good quality for the money.

    I would shop around a lot because as others have set they DO vary in quality. But then again, so do stick built homes. DH's cousin has a $500,000 house just down the road from us and I think they had more problems and miscommunication getting their place built than we had :shrug:

    Hope your home search goes well!
    Ann
     
  12. evisr8

    evisr8 Member

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    we will be getting a modular home for our 40 acre homestead. it will be set on a full basement foundation. once we decide on the options, it will take around 6 weeks to build. i think they are built better than on-site stick builts. since they are built in huge warehouses, the materials are not exposed to the elements. they have come a long way the past several years. if you think they are small, check this floor plan out.
     
  13. Drizler

    Drizler Well-Known Member

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    I owned a regular 60' trailer for the last 20 years renting it for the last 7. They are absolute **** in every way. I have owned a modular new since 95. The modular with the exception of a slight modification of the roof trusses to accomodate folding the last 4' up for transport is exactly the same as stick built. Everything is standard duty construction unless you want the cheapo doors, windows ect. I have no issues with it whatsoever besides the usual wear and tear from daily living. You can get modulars about any style and with a wide range of options in quality in the furnishings. A good one won't be much cheaper than a stick built. Ours based at 40K and cost 70 using good windows, extended eves and widening it 4'. Best off to get carpets ect done locally afterward and go with the better grade of shingles, roofing windows ect. sticking with name brands. I know another guy who lives in a modular built in 1973 and he says the same thing about his. One word of advice on trailers and doublewides which are the same thing really. If you ever get considering one slap yourself many times till you regain your sanity. Then get your friends together and have them slap you too. You will be glad you did because they truly suck, and then the floor rots out............ :cow:
     
  14. Hank - Narita

    Hank - Narita Well-Known Member

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    No matter what they say, do not buy a mobile/modular. Not as good as a home.
     
  15. rzrubek

    rzrubek Flying Z

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    A Mobile and a Modular are not the same thing. A Mobile and a Manufactured are pretty much the same thing. A Modular could also be called Panalized construction.
     
  16. Oilpatch197

    Oilpatch197 Well-Known Member

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    But for the price, you can't beat a Mobile home!

    Go in and ask if they have a "fixer upper" and you'll pay them $2,000, you never know what they might have.