Purple Tomatoes??

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by james dilley, Oct 22, 2006.

  1. james dilley

    james dilley Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Just read on Yahoo. That theres now A purple tomato thats good for you. It won't be released for A few more years though. The breeders are crossing it with Cherry tomatoes. I wonder what they will taste like??
     
  2. ceresone

    ceresone Well-Known Member Supporter

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    James, I ,personally just cant eat the purple, or black tomatoes. while the taste is alright, to me, a slice looks like a slab of raw meat on my plate.--lol--just me, i'm sure--
     

  3. Kee Wan

    Kee Wan Well-Known Member

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    This year, I grew Black Cherry, Purple Russian and Cherokee Purple tomatoes.....ALL were WONDERFUL!!!

    They do look a little strange - but they taste millions of tomes better than the "pablum in a tomato skin" that you get in the grocery store.

    IF you can't eat them sliced on a plate.....can them - or dice them in a sauce.....make tomato soup....I can see how the coloring could look as you have described - but if it were burried in something - would that help??
     
  4. Pony

    Pony Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I grew Black Krim and Cherokee Purples, and I love 'em!

    I don't understand the statement about them being good for you... Aren't all tomatoes good for you?

    Pony!
     
  5. james dilley

    james dilley Well-Known Member Supporter

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    They were talking about A chemical compound found in Nature that helps prevent certain Ailments.
     
  6. Zebraman

    Zebraman Well-Known Member

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    Hey Guys;I have noticed that there are two camps for Tomatoes.
    1.Loves tomatoes with a lot of sweetness
    2.Loves Old Fashioned/Acid taste.
    I grow a couple of hundred cultivars,mostly Red.It has been my experience that most if not all black,and or brown and purple tomatoes look great visually,but taste bland,insipid and overly sweet.if you like sweet tomatoes you are going to love purple tomatoes!
    If however you like old fashioned/acid you will be disappointed.I have also found this to be true with Orange,Yellow and White tomatoes(including Kellogs Breakfast and Indian Moon.)-
     
  7. Peacock

    Peacock writing some wrongs Supporter

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    Zebra - you're right about the preferences.

    I like them both for different uses. I like the tart old-fashioned kind when the tomato isn't the main flavor, such as on a burger or a BLT, or for cooking. I like the sweet kind to eat out of hand, sliced or in a salad. But...some sweet tomatoes are just sweet and nothing else. I expect a sweet tomato to have more flavor dimension than just sweetness.

    My favorite sweet tomato is German Queen, which is pink. I haven't been impressed with the yellows (blech -- only tomato I've ever spit out was yellow) or purples.

    And BTW I believe the "good for you" chemical you're speaking of is Lycopene, which is what makes tomatoes red. The redder, the healthier. The issue, in this case, is that some new varieties of purple toms still have a little bit of red on their skin and therefore still have Lycopene.
     
  8. Marcia in MT

    Marcia in MT Well-Known Member Supporter

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    According to an AP article in our newspaper this morning, the purple tomato is being fine-tuned by researchers at Oregon State U. Rather than lycopene, the phytochemical is the same one found in blueberries that is thought to reduce the risk of cancer and heart disease.

    It's already been 6 years in development, and was taste-tested at farmers markets around the Mid Valley area this summer. Seed is not yet available to commercial growers or the general public.

    The purple tomato traces its roots to a wild species in South America. It is truly eggplant purple, not just dark colored.