puppys, dogs, and our hearts

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Firethorn, Feb 9, 2005.

  1. Firethorn

    Firethorn Well-Known Member

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    So many posts about these, the best of our companions. As I sit here with our 6 week old basset hound asleep in my lap I have this question going through my head. Where is the forum for Dogs? We talk about them enough. Try to find them for our homesteads and try to sell them from our homesteads. Rescue them, love them, worry over them. I would volunteer, but I dont know computers well enough and probly would not be reliable.
    Am I the only one who sees the need for a dog forum on hst ?

    Now about the puppy. We picked up two bassets over the last three weeks. They are both tris. So beautiful. We intend to bread. I look at the little ones and iI have become verry criticle about their apearances. I find myself woundering if they will carry one the traits that I desire in my dogs. Does anyone else have these wounderfull dogs? Do you know where I can find info of the proper form at puppyhood? I felt I was verry picky when chooseing them. Maybe I will have to work quite some time to get the traits I want in the dogs. We will also be raising pyrs. I have noticed that some of the things I like in both breads are not what is common, or "besired" for "show" bogs. Should I care? I dont intend to show. Dont have the time. I am of the opinion that to bread to show has harmed some of the lovely traits of some dogs.
    Our basset girl has a blue sire. He is smashing!!! The breader has another litter on the way where the sire has a son that is TWICE the size of any other basset I have seen. (the son is neutered, due to an accident when he was a couple of months. The vet said to nueter him would probly stunt his growth. WOW wounder how big he could have gotten?) Anyway I love the bigger ones. Stocky and solid.
    Mrs C.
     
  2. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I think a dog/cat forum or pet forum would be terrific.
     

  3. mamahen

    mamahen Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Mrs. C,
    We are "owned" by a tri-colored female Basset, named "Daisy".

    Hubby always wanted a purebred basset, I looked long and hard (even found some on this forum, but they were in Missouri :( ) I drove 1.5 hours to get Daisy. They were kennel kept, outside, only taken in to be loved on by the children. None the less Daisy was completely housebroken at 10 wks (the week we got her!!)

    Now about bassets. You don't want to breed for "big" bassets. If you're looking to stick with the standards given by the AKC. Daisy's dad & gr-dad were HUGE!! The vet thought Daisy would be gigantic. Huge feet & really big body size for a puppy. She's 2.5 years and 45 lbs. Just right for a lap dog! :rolleyes: OR at least that's what she thinks!

    THe vet tried to talk me into breeding her. I wanted to wait until she was 2. Then at 2, decided that wasn't for me. She has double front teeth on the top. Not something I wanted to breed for, although I couldn't find anything about that as being a serious fault. The vet could pull them. However, I loved her temperment until she hit 2!! Then she got a little, I don't want to say grumpy. Maybe moody? She is still very sweet, loves to play. Very active!! A little too rough with the kittens, still she just has this mood sometimes. So she was spayed in Oct.

    She has decided that human feet are evil!! But only when she's sleeping!! She doesn't sleep in bed anymore because of this! Sometimes I wish we wouldn't have spayed her & had a litter. But knowing my son & myself, we would've ended up with 10 bassets instead of one!! :D

    If you ever want to talk Bassets, give me a buzz!!

    Tricia
     
  4. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    I'm all for a dog/pet forum. Great Idea and probably would less tie up other forums with separate discussion?

    I love my dogs. The few periods in life that I didn't have them seem less remembered. Terriers now that they are, and my little one lays on my lap sometimes (like now). Somehow our lives wouldn't be complete without our best animal companion friends, most especially dogs. :worship:
     
  5. goldenlady

    goldenlady Well-Known Member

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    I, too, have thought about the need for a dog forum. It's a great idea and would appeal to most of us. We raise and breed golden retrievers and love them dearly. They have very loveable personalities and, though larger, still think of themselves as lap dogs!

    Breeding is a huge responsibility. While we personally do not show our dogs, we do breed top quality so that others might. Also, breeding only top quality dogs ensures a healthier, happier puppy. All our dogs go through an extensive check for health (OFA, heart and eye testing). We have had dogs that, while very loveable, were NOT breeding material for one reason or another, and so were spayed and lived long, happy lives as companion dogs.
     
  6. Corgitails

    Corgitails Well-Known Member

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    You don't have to breed for show.

    But you *do* need to breed responsibly.

    Hundreds of thousands- if not millions- of pets are put to sleep in this country every year. You need to make sure that your dogs are not going to add to this problem, but breeding only dogs that are temperamentally and physically sound. This means doing the appropriate health testing (OFA or PennHip for hips, but I'm not sure what else is needed in bassetts), NOT selling to anyone withi the money but only to people who will be a good home for a dog, of this particular breed, personality and at this time in their life, and standing behind your dogs- be willing to take them back if the person who bought them can no longer be responsible. It means raising the healthiest, best socialized, absolute BEST litter you can, even though that means a HUGE commitment of time both in puppy-time and in time finding the right owners.

    You can breed away from show standards if that's really what you want to do, but consider that the show standard is an attempt to describe the ideal dog of that breed, at least visually and in a superficial sense, character-wise. If you deviate too far from that, are you really breeding THAT breed? (IE, a lab that is totally calm and doesn't retrieve... is that really a lab? A basset with skinny legs and short ears- is that really a bassett, or a beagle?)

    Showing is not the end-all and be-all of breeding, but it serves a purpose. Breeding without purpose is pointless- you shoudl have a firm goal for any litter you produce, (To improve mom's earset, dad's voice, hunting ability, stamina, whatever- but there SHOULD be specific goals .You shold also look at pedigree, to see what the dogs behind them have produced, to see that you *can* get those improvements out of that particular breeding- no good breeding to a nice male to improve an earset if everything behind him had bad earsets and *he's* the improvement!) not just breed the two dogs you have to each other every time because you own them both.

    As a breeder, you MUST be critical of your own dogs. If you can't be critical and find their faults (and there IS no perfect dog), you have no business breeding them. You must have the knowlege to see and evaluate their strong and weak points, and the guts to say "I love this dog, but I am goign to spay her because she's not good enough." Even when it breaks your heart to do it. *most* dogs are not good enough, and as a responsible breeder, you should be committed to improving the breed, not just making cute puppies to sell.

    Traits that are important are sometimes visible in puppies, sometimes not. It depends on the trait and your breed. Heaviness of bone will change, bite will change, earset can change, but shoulder angulation, front (very, very important in my breed, Cardigans, and your breed, Bassets, since it's such an integral part of what differentiates a basset from other hounds) don't tend to change much for the better.

    Mamahen, if you don't like her personality, you did the right thing by spaying her. That sort of thing is very hereditary, both by momma's interaction with the litter AND her genetics.

    I'd really like a pet board!
     
  7. mamahen

    mamahen Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Cait, That's what I thought. But I'm used to the Cocker Spaniels laid back attidude. I had a cocker girl for 12 years before she had to be put to sleep. Bassets are a whole new world!! I do love the little stinker though! But there are soooo many puppies & litters in this world, without me putting 8 or 10 more into it!

    It's not that she has a bad attitude, just a little more stand-offish than I'm used to. Don't get me wrong, she loves to be loved! And loves getting attention from everyone, not really a "mean" bone in her body. Just doesn't "need" me like my Maggie used to! And she's such a counter surfer!! :D

    Our next pup will be either a Boykin Spaniel, Cocker or a Pembroke. I tend to over research every breed when I'm trying to decide. But really, you have so few dogs in your life, you want just the right match! Hubby gets tired of listening to how great each breed is. He just wants to get another Basset. :rolleyes:

    Tricia
     
  8. januaries

    januaries Well-Known Member

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    The vet said neutering will stunt a dog's growth? I've never heard that. I was under the impression that neutering often made an animal larger. Certainly every neutered cat I've ever met was quite large.
     
  9. GoldenMom

    GoldenMom Well-Known Member

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    You're absolutely right. Neutering actually lets the animal, be a dog, cat, steer, or whatever, grow for a longer period than normal. The signal to the growth plates to shut down is the production of sex hormones, so an intact animal sends those signals sooner and stronger than altered animals (altered animals still produce those hormones, just in much smaller quantities). They've actually done studies in cats that show that the growth plate in the femoral head fuses much later in neutered male cats than non-neutered. Unfortunately for the cat, this can result in a slightly increased susceptibility to fracturing that growth plate (personally I'd rather risk it than live with an intact Tom cat for 12-18 months!!!).
     
  10. Queen Bee

    Queen Bee Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I second (third-fourth etc) the Dog/cat forum or call it the Pet forum!

    Best thing we ever did for all our animals were to spay/neutered them! Who needs more puppies unless you are breeding a champion... Just type in your "favorite breed" rescue and see how many of them have been abused, neglected or thrown away!! It will break your heart.

    IF you decide to breed and sell you animals--Why not offer a "refund" of 50.00, if the animal is altered asap.. (Usually give them 4 months). If the owner doesn't collect the $ donate it to a breed rescue. Just tack the $50.00 onto the cost of the dog... Have your own contract --if the dog does not work out, you (as a seller) must be responsible for that animal.


    Good luck Debbie
     
  11. Wags

    Wags Well-Known Member Supporter

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    There are over a dozen basset hound rescues in the US...

    Every "pure" bred has dozens of resuces dedicated to them... even the expensive breeds. Don't know how some one could spend thousands of dollars on a dog only to neglect and abandon them, but it happens all the time.

    Spay/nueter all of your pets!

    Don't bred or buy while shelter animals die!
     
  12. Wags

    Wags Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The following facts are verbatim from the Humane Society of the United States website:

    For every human born, 7 puppies and kittens are born. (1)

    One female cat and her offspring can produce 420,000 cats in 7 years. (1)

    One female dog and her offspring can produce 67,000 dogs in 6 years. (2)

    An estimated 6 to 8 million dogs and cats are euthanized in animal shelters each year in the United States. Millions more are abandoned, only to suffer from disease, starvation or injury before dying.

    In a study of relinquishment of dogs and cats in 12 U.S. animal shelters, 30% of the surrendered animals were purebred. (3)

    The same study indicated that 55% of the surrendered dogs and 47% of the surrendered cats were not spayed or neutered. (3)

    Of all dogs reported in severe attacks on people in Texas during 1998 (where the reproductive status of the animal was known), unsterilized male dogs were 2.6 times more likely to attack than female dogs or neutered male dogs. (4)

    It costs U.S. taxpayers an estimated $2 billion each year to impound, shelter euthanize and dispose of homeless animals. (5)

    Approximately 55% of dogs and puppies entering U.S. animal shelters are killed, based on reports from 1,038 U.S. animal shelters. (6)

    Approximately 71% of cats and kittens entering U.S. animal shelters are killed based on the same report.



    Facts provided courtesy of (and the HSUS webpage http://www.hsus.org):
    1. The Humane Society of the United States Pet Overpopulation Fact Sheet
    2. SPAY/USA "Did You Know" Fact Sheet
    3. Journal of Applied Animal Welfare Science Volume 1, Number 3, pg. 213
    4. Texas Department of Health 1998 Severe Animal Attack Surveillance
    5. USA Today, June 23, 1998, pg. 1
    6. National Council of Pet Population Study Shelter Statistics survey - 1996
     
  13. daffodil

    daffodil flower lover

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    I love dogs! Just had our GSD neutered yesterday. He's about 10 months old. Took him today for a trip into town and he was shaking when I put him in the front seat. But I wanted him to know that not every car trip will be like THAT one. Poor thing. You wonder what they must be thinking: "Geez, what they taking THIS time :waa: "
     
  14. Judy in IN

    Judy in IN Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I lost my old collie last spring. :waa: Since then, I've moved, and now am moving again! This next place fronts a state highway, so I'm diffident about getting a dog. I miss having a dog, though.

    The guy next door where I'm re-locating has a beautiful German Shepard, though, and the fellow that's keeping goats at my new place right now raises coon dogs, beagles, and WORKING Australian Shepards. I think I'm in trouble! :D
     
  15. HilltopDaisy

    HilltopDaisy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Thank you Wags, for posting that very important information. I don't see how anyone can read those figures and not be deeply affected by them. Breeding more dogs doesn't help the problem in any way. Adopting homeless dogs and having them spayed /neutered is the answer.
     
  16. cathyharrell

    cathyharrell Well-Known Member

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    My son's German Shepard had 9 puppies and I was so worried about what would happen to them but he sold them all for $150. a piece except for two he gave to his friends. I hope he will get her fixed but I don't think he is going to. I hope the people who bought them will spay and neuter them.