pumpkin problems

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by Crystal H, Aug 23, 2006.

  1. Crystal H

    Crystal H Well-Known Member

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    Hi all.

    I had planted a pumkin in the garden. It has been an uphill battle as it was attacked by the nasty slugs but survived and thrived. (so i thought). We had some pumpkins growing, some the size of large cantaloupe. I looked at them this morning and they have turned white and look like they are rotting on the vine. I make sure that they have enough water. Maybe too much? I don't see any cracking .

    The weather has been cool. 65-75 . What did I do wrong? :shrug: I was hoping for some monster sized one for halloween but I don't think we'll have any. :grump:

    Alas... maybe next year. Any tip would be appreciated.

    Crystal
     
  2. Pony

    Pony Well-Known Member Supporter

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    What do your leaves look like? Any sign of discoloration, rot, or wilt there?

    Pony!
     

  3. BeckyW

    BeckyW Well-Known Member

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    Colorado
    There's an old farm trick you might try, if not this year then save it for next.
    If you live in a cool summer area (or short season area) when the squashes/pumpkins/melons get to be the size of a golf ball, gently place them on top of clean tuna cans (or other larger metal can) that has been turned upside down and placed on the soil like a little platform. The can does 2 things (at least): it keeps the squash/melon from sitting on the soil where bugs or too much moisture can affect it AND the can holds the day's heat just a bit and radiates that heat to the melon.

    Now, there may be a scientific reason why this does or doesn't work however, I did it for years on the foggy coast of southern California. I grew the sweetest melons without one earwig or pillbug bite in them AND in a climate where people said melons wouldn't sweeten up. (Just so you know, on the coast in May/June/July we would often not have the fog burn off until after 2pm and have it roll back in at 3:30/4pm at the latest for 6-7 days a week). It looked kind of funny to see all these little cans all over the garden with melons and squashes sitting on them but it worked for me!

    If too much moisture is one of your problems, may I suggest growing in raised beds so the water drains away quickly. Hope you can salvage a bit of your crop.
    BW
     
  4. Crystal H

    Crystal H Well-Known Member

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    I'll try the can thing... I water the main vine but not around the plant. I've mulched the area with lots of straw and it stays dry even though we have some dew in the morning. The Leaves of the plant are large and green without any discoloration . they do get wilty in the afternoon sun. I'll try again . Thanks. I really love this site!

    Crystal
     
  5. Zebraman

    Zebraman Well-Known Member

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    Hey Crystal;You are in Oregon.Call the County Extension office and ask what varieties grow well in your climate?Also Pumpkins are Heavy Feeders and if you didn't have enough dug in the plant may have aborted for that reason.-
     
  6. Crystal H

    Crystal H Well-Known Member

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    These punkins are literally growing in a pile of poop. I planted the vine in a hill 12" high 24" wide pile of alpaca caca. That's probably why it grew so fast on the vine. I think the stem was just too weak from the initial slug damage to sustain the fruit. NEXT YEAR THEY WILL BE MONSTROUS! ( 'I'll try at least) Thanks all!
     
  7. Zebraman

    Zebraman Well-Known Member

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    Hey Crystal;I understand that but what about the Potash and Phosphoros.I always dig in Hoof and Horn Meal as well as Bone meal for pumpkins and Winter Squash.I have never experienced the problem you are talking about.If your plants are growing really well I'd bet the problem will be solved with P and K.-
     
  8. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    Do an "autopsy" on the victim. Some large varieties produce a fruit nearly as big as you describe even though the blossom wasn't properly pollinated. The plant tries to feed the growing fruit but then aborts it as a losing effort. See if there were any signs of any seed development. If it appears to have been an un-pollinated fruit, that would probably have been your problem.

    Martin
     
  9. RedTartan

    RedTartan Icelandic Sheep Supporter

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    I just found an amazing pumpkin-growing website I thought everyone would like to see:

    www.pumpkinnook.com

    Everything you always wanted to know about pumpkins :)

    RedTartan