pumping water from pond

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by ljdehaan, Oct 7, 2004.

  1. ljdehaan

    ljdehaan New Member

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    I want to use a gasoline powered pump to pump water from my pond to my field to do some irrigation. In the Northern Tool catelog there is a 5.5 horse power pump. A couple terms I don't know: 26 ft maximum suction lift? and 187ft max total head?
    Also, are there any sources I can check to give me gallons per minute at specific distances or heights. Or pressure at those points. Perhaps a graph of some kind? Any help or thoughts would be much appreciated. Thanks LJ
     
  2. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    It means that the pump can't "suck" the water any higher than 26 feet in elevation nor can it "push' the water any higher than 187 feet in elevation. The other info you need would be specific to the pump model and should be obtained from Northern Tool.
     

  3. joan from zone six

    joan from zone six Well-Known Member

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    and note that "total head" has little bearing on how far you can push the water horizontally -
     
  4. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Also, the higher your head, the less volume it pumps. If you are putting some kind of a sprinlker on the end, that also greatly increases pressure & lowers volume - be sure pump can handle this.

    If you are out in the visable, some govt bodies get real busy-body about pumping water from a natural pond and how many permits you need. Just a word to the wise.

    --->Paul
     
  5. j.r. guerra in s. tx.

    j.r. guerra in s. tx. Well-Known Member

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    If your source is higher than destination, then gravity helps a lot. I remember draining an indoor aquarium by putting one end of garden hose into water, and 'inhaling' on other end (just like siphening gas from a car gas tank), draining it into yard. Once water starts moving, it does not stop until drained. Thats why arresters are installed on water lines inside homes - if they weren't the shock from water moving then stopping would destroy supply pipes.

    Your pond drainage would be much harder though.