Pulling Fenceposts

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by twind59, May 4, 2005.

  1. twind59

    twind59 Well-Known Member

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    Does anyone have a simple method of pulling fenceposts that a city dweller can use to pull up a couple of posts?
    Thanks
    Barry
    Indianapolis
     
  2. Bill in Tn

    Bill in Tn Active Member

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    I usually dig a hole right beside it with a posthole digger. Guess yuo could use a spade.
     

  3. Ann-NWIowa

    Ann-NWIowa Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Car jack - wrap a chain around the post then jack it out of the ground.
     
  4. GrannyG

    GrannyG Well-Known Member

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    DH takes the original post and leans the new post over against the old post(the one that is supposed to be pulled out),ties a chain around the bottom of the post to be pulled and brings the chain up the post and over the top of the leaning post and ties to the truck and pulls it out. Now is that clear as mud? :haha: Says it is easier to do it than to write it.
     
  5. SteveD(TX)

    SteveD(TX) Well-Known Member

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    Like Ann said, a car jack will work, but it has to be the old fashioned type - a bumper jack. You can't hardly buy them anymore, except at a junk yard. Tractor supply has a farm jack that works really well. I just found out since I just pulled out 31 wooden posts anchored in concrete with one. Less than 30 bucks.
     
  6. Quint

    Quint Well-Known Member

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    A hi-lift or tractor jack works great and it is a tool everyone needs around the homestead. Stay away from the chinese ones though. I had one fly apart on me during a lifting chore and it hurled parts in every direction and caused a very dangerous situation when the machinery dropped.
     
  7. Ozarks_1

    Ozarks_1 Well-Known Member

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    You never said what kind of posts - so I'll guess you're talking about the typical metal T-posts. If that's indeed correct, then the old-fashioned car jack or hi-lift farm jack is probably the best thing to use. There are T-post pullers on the market, but it's probably kind of hard to justify spending the money just a few fence posts. (If you're only going to use it for pulling - and nothing 'serious' - a Chinese-made jack will do just fine.)
     
  8. HermitJohn

    HermitJohn Well-Known Member

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    I've had the American hi-lift jacks act up. The mechanism needs to be well lubed. That jack handle is heavy duty and can give you quite a whalop if it comes up and hits you in the head.

    They do work well to pull posts. You can wrap a chain around base of post and fasten to lift part of jack with a bolt. (should be a bolt hole on underside of lift stub). For steel posts I just welded up a little attachment out of bits of rebar that works even easier, easily installable/removable.

    Watch out on old car bumper jacks. I got my first hi-lift back when a bumper jack came apart while using it and piece of it hit me on the head.

    Friend has a Chinese hi-lift. Seems just as strong as the American hi-lift though maybe all Chinese hi-lifts are not built the same. Only thing I didnt like was handle is not removable.

    For lot of steel posts (or wooden) is two people and a tractor with a three point hitch and a chain.
     
  9. wr

    wr Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Pulling posts can be quite easy and involve very little labor. Get an old tire rim, set it against the post, securely attach a chain to the post, over the rim, attach the chain to the bumper of a vehicle or tractor and move ahead. The posts come out easy, never break and if it's in good shape it can be used again.
     
  10. Wags

    Wags Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You can get a t-post fence puller at Harbor Freight for under $15 - deifnately worth the money. I just pulled fence line for a couple of acres a few days ago. Piece of cake! I did it one handed, with a year old baby on my hip - oh yeah and I'm pg too - so if I can do it anyone can!

    Plus $15 is a small price to pay if it saves a trip to the chiropractor!
     
  11. raymilosh

    raymilosh Well-Known Member

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    hi there
    listen to granny G and WR. the idea is that you can pull very hard horizontally with a car or a come along but the force is applied to pulling the post straight up. the idea using a car rim is the best i ever heard...assuming you can get a vehicle to pull.
    a website called handy farm devices has a drawing of GrannyG's idea. She's right, it's easier to do it than to explain it. (BTW, if you don't have a team of horses to pull like is suggested on the website, you can just use a car.)http://journeytoforever.org/farm_library/device/devicesToC.html#contents

    if you cannot get a car to do the work and don't want to buy anything, try the following. It is a method of using a fulcrum, a lever and your own weight pushing down to pull the post up. You basically attach the post to one side of a see asw and you push down on the other side, the difference being that the pivot point isn't in the center

    set something which is a foot or so tall and sturdy next to the post (a jack stand, a round of firewood, a rock, a rim, etc). It will be the fulcrum. (A fulcrum is the thing at the center of a see saw that holds it up and provides a place for it to pivot)

    wrap a stout rope or chain or nylon webbing around the post.

    attach a strong lever (a steel pipe, a wooden post, a stout branch, see saw, etc) which is 5 feet or longer in length to the rope or chain and rest it on the fulcrum.

    carefully push down on the far end of the lever.

    Adjust the position of the fulkcrum to be closer to the post if you find you need to generate more lift.
    ray
     
  12. mink

    mink Well-Known Member

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    ive never seen many metal posts that couldnt be pulled out by wiggling then a lil then pulling up.find yourself a farmer girl with a lilttle meat on her bones ....she'll show ya..lmao
     
  13. oregonbuckaroo

    oregonbuckaroo Member

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    A Hi-lift works well for me. But i have broke one pulling out a t-post befor.
     
  14. Beststash

    Beststash Well-Known Member

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    FEL on tractor with chain - if you don't have one ask a neighbor - very quick!!!
     
  15. centexguy

    centexguy Well-Known Member

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    t-post? pour some water around it maybe a quart wait 10minutes wiggle it, pull it out.
     
  16. RedneckPete

    RedneckPete Well-Known Member

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    You can get a T-bar driver that comes with a hook on one end, and two little brackets. One slides over the T-bar, the driver part hooks into it and pivots on the other bracket. Slid an iron bar into the driver, press down and out comes the T-bar.

    If you really want more info on this thing I'll get it for you. I used to work in landscaping planting trees, and drove thousands of T-bars. We would go back two years later and pull out the T-bars from the survey homes, to use them again. One guy can easily pull 50 - 100 T-bars in an hour.

    Pete
     
  17. hatwoman22

    hatwoman22 Well-Known Member

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    HAHA, I pulled a few of those myself a few weeks ago, and about 14 a few months before that. I did it just after it rained, a push a shove, and then straight up.

    But I live in town not on a farm!
     
  18. YuccaFlatsRanch

    YuccaFlatsRanch Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Drive up to post with tractor bucket. Wrap chain and attach to bucket. Pull out post with bucket.

    Its why I say the tractor with a loader is the single most useful tool on a homestead. Just got a Bobcat skidsteer to replace the tractor and its even more useful.

    BTW - Ford 4000 diesel tractor with power steering, loader, bush hog, back blade, auger, and forklift forks for sale for $6000.00 in San Antonio, TX area. Private mail if interested.
     
  19. tnborn

    tnborn Well-Known Member

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    If it is wooden fence post, take a log chain or a good chain that they can be bought at a hardware store or co-op feed store. hook it to a 4 wheel drive truck and drive on. Put the The fence is pull out easy. No back pains, little wear and tear on the body.T post require more work. I usually have to tug and pull sometimes a jack is required.
    tnborn