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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Had to pull a BIG baby this morning. I thought mamma wasn't gonna deliver live birth but the neighbor helped pull him and he's kickin and screamin BUT momma has no interest right now. I've given him some clostrum and have him in the house next to the heat to get warm. What else??? been so long since I've had baby with problems and momma not interested that my mind is racing:Bawling:
He's about the size of a week old :confused:
 

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Take some aspirin now- you are going to have one h*** of a head ache later on today from the adrenilin.

If you have to put hands up in her past her cervix, give her some antibiotics- I give Bio-Mycin 200 as an intra-uterine bolus at 12ml- pull it up, unscrew the needle and squirt it way down into the uterus *after* she drops the placenta. Offer warm water and whatever she wants to eat.

Make sure they bond- if he's up, doing baby goat things, do what Rose said.
 

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Get that baby back out with the momma as fast as you can! It ain't your baby, it's hers, and if you keep it with you instead of with her she'll come to think that and you'll have a bottle baby on your hands (or a fresh kid dinner).

Is she a first timer? Sometimes it takes a bit longer for their motherly instincts to kick in, particularly if someone else had to help her through her labor. They seem to "sulk" a little bit after that level of violation. It might just take her a wee bit to get sorted out, and you might miss that boat if that baby is in your house instead of the barn stall with the mother.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I know to put the baby back out as soon as possible but he was shaking so bad from the cold I just put him next to the woodstove so he could get warm and dried off.
He seems to be trying to stand now so I'm sending him back out to see how things go. Wish me and big junior luck.
 

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Good luck! If he lives he might be a real winner! If you're raising goats for meat (or dual purpose), then I'd consider not castrating him. If all the other traits are good, it could be an ideal way to get some big animals.
 

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Put them in a pen just big enough for her to turn around in.
That will force her to stay close to it and get used to motherhood.
Usually 24 hours is long enough
 

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Good luck! If he lives he might be a real winner! If you're raising goats for meat (or dual purpose), then I'd consider not castrating him. If all the other traits are good, it could be an ideal way to get some big animals.
or an ideal way to have to assist in ALL the deliveries. or have loits of dead mommas and kids.
 

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or an ideal way to have to assist in ALL the deliveries. or have loits of dead mommas and kids.
I was just about to say the same thing. I just sold a gorgeous awesome buck that had everything i was looking for - except he threw monster babies.

Ideal sire will throw a small but long baby that grows fast.

Keep an eye on your other does that's bred to the same buck.

Andrea
 

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I don't know how long it's been since she delivered but if she still has fresh afterbirth around, smear a little of that on his head and present him to her. The hormones should kick in.

Barring that, you can either bottle-feed him or hold momma many times a day to let him feed.

Did you check momma for any other babies?
 

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I do not bring babies inside to warm up unless they are dying. When you bring them back out they get even colder. Best to lock mom and kid up together, he will stop shaking as soon as you get some warm colostrum in him. It will also help mom pass the afterbirth.
 

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They are not kiddin when they say put baby back. I had one that went down had to keep in house over night baby was a twin she only has intrest in the one I did not take into the house. She will not take the other one. Now I have a bottle baby, I other wise would not have had but I had no choice I had to warm him he had really low temp.
 

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Don't give up, don't give up, don't give up. Make sure he has a spot in their pen where he can escape to if she butts him. Make sure the pen is relatively small so she doesn't get too far from him. If she won't nurse him, then force her to by holding her as many times a day as you can get out there. My doe who was a chronic I-only-love-one-twin would sometimes take two or three days of forced nursing to give up and feed the baby. After the second day, I could usually just come to the gate and she would stop and the kid would race towards her and nurse. After a few more days, I could catch her actually feeding it without any threats from me. I DID cull her after the second year of this, but her daughter is a GREAT mother!
 

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I had a cold baby last year and my neighbor brought over a hot water bottle. She wrapped the bottle in a towel and had me lay the baby on it. I sat in the pen with momma and baby until all was well.

Good luck to you!

Blessings from the Ridge
 

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I think there is little that could have been done about this bucklings size. Seeing as the buck has been being used for 4 years. Means he would be safe to use. I think this baby must have just got fed a little to well womb. I hope he stays warm and does very well for you!!!! Forgot to say my brother was 14 lbs at birth try explaining that and that isn't a joke. Some just get to cozy in the womb to long and to well fed. Was she past her due date any? That may have a little to do with it.
 

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Most single babies are larger than their multiple counterparts. I have 2 bottle baby doelings less than a week old (long story). The single was born at 16 lbs and the twin was 4.5. Singles become huge because they receive all the nutrition. Keep that baby with his mama unless you want this,



Even though they are cute and cuddly, they are hard work. They take constant care . If you work outside the home you will need someone to care for them in your absence.

They are very loud and demanding and if they are a wake at 2am, so are you.

If you are planning on going out of town, forget it.

Milk and replacers are expensive unless you have a steady supply of fresh goats milk available.

Just some things to think about from someone who has been there and doing it again.
 

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Just wondering, not being snarky, how cold could it be in Texas, even in January?

Most of our kids are born in February, March and April, which here in northernmost Vermont is pretty darn cold.

Sure they shiver, but you dry them, let mama lick them, maybe set up an oil heater in a rabbit cage weighted down with bricks. Even my tiny Nigie babies do fine after they've been fed and dried.

Just wonderin'.

Blessings, Jill~
 

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Just wondering, not being snarky, how cold could it be in Texas, even in January?

Most of our kids are born in February, March and April, which here in northernmost Vermont is pretty darn cold.

Sure they shiver, but you dry them, let mama lick them, maybe set up an oil heater in a rabbit cage weighted down with bricks. Even my tiny Nigie babies do fine after they've been fed and dried.

Just wonderin'.

Blessings, Jill~
What is cold to us, may not be cold to you.
However, when an animal or human is used to a temp in the 60's, then a cold front moves in, with a strong north wind and it gets down in the 30's (not counting wind chill), that is COLD for a newborn!
It's all a matter of what you are used to, and a sudden drop in temp is hard for a newborn to deal with.
TEXAS ARTIST, email me if you need help with that baby.
Did Mama take him back? Did she ever get any milk?
 
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