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I'm sure this has been discussed here,but I did a search and am not finding what I want. Any time I see property that borders state land,I pass it by but I'm wondering,does anyone here border state land(such as a statE forest)?
 

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From what I have read here and elsewhere, they are generally a good neighbor that is stable and nice and all, so that is a real big positive.

As the state manages the land, they may kill weeds or insects with spray or do clear cutting every 25 years which may be an issue if you were expecting to live pesticide free or enjoy the forest view for the rest of your life.....

You tend to be dealing with state owned logging roads often for access or nearby which has different rules from public roads - as well as attracting beer bashers and ATV fun loving folk. Hunters and explorers don't often realize your land is different from the land they are wandering so you might get a few more of those wandering about your property.

Every state and specific forest will probably be a little different on the details. Kinda depends on what you are looking for in a neighbor I guess too?

Paul
 

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It all depends on the type of land. The BLM land we back up to is an extension of the scree slope that's the back part of our property. It's not usable land, except for kids who want to climb on sliding rocks--which would be mine and the kids next door. Nor is it easily accessible--a several mile hike or permission from one of the land owners who back up to it. Maybe a good mule or horse could cross it--deer do--but an ATV'd roll. Go check out the parcels you'd otherwise be interested in and see what it's like. Land that could be logged, hunted, or partied on would be a different story than what we've got.
 

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My midwife lived on a parcel surrounded by state land. I don't believe she ever had any trouble with the state itself, only with its' guests. Despite gates, fences, deliberately felling trees across private roads and "no trespassing" signs, they often dealt with idiots who refused to believe they were on private property.
 

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It's great for us and the neighbor. We boarder the State, BLM, and timber company. Great neighbors so far.

Our small amount of acreage, turns into square miles. Twice in 10 years the timber company has blasted their pit, other than that no visitors. Other than to let us know that work was scheduled and to expect some extra traffic, so we could watch the animals a bit closer. Also to once a year or so to make contact and see if anything out of the ordinary has happened.

I would not have State, BLM, or timber company, for neighboring property stop me in anyway for ground I would otherwise be interested in. If it makes you feel better call and see what the future use prospect is for the area.



Owl
 

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I have 2 parcels of land, one I live on. Both border the National Forest on two sides. Both are fully fenced. Both parcels bought bordering the forest on purpose to be a little more unique than just acreage like the next parcel nearby.

It's like having a huge playground with low taxes. I'd come home from work, saddle up & be able to ride until dark. No having to trailer my horse.

Right now they're running cows behind the property I live on. Certainly don't mind it as they'll be moved in a couple weeks - and the rancher who runs the cows keeps the fencing in great condition!

I do keep my gates locked. And I'm in Area 3 for elk hunting so keep my radio on to alert hunters there's houses close by during hunting season. When I hear quads, I just start target practicing (no, not into the forest) with my .22 - they soon motor off...

After 13 years here, the only drawback I can see is the elk jumping my perimeter fences & eating the new growth on my trees. I love the privacy, peace & not having anyone be able to build close to me! I can dance neked in the moonlight! ;)

When this sells, I'll certainly miss the peacefulness and nature I have here.
 

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Goshen Farm
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We really enjoyed bordering state/federal land on two sides of our property in Montana. One are was a really great elk hunting area so our dogs sometimes brought home the grossest elk legs etc. The ranchers that ran cattle on the state/fed land were always very nice and even pulled me out of the snow one time.
 

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Our land bordered the state land belonging to the canal, never a problem. Hiked back there all the time. The boats stayed in the canal and never wandered on our land :) Eventually the land was taken by a utility so we don't own it anymore. The state said they were happy that people used the strip for recreation. People use it for shooting, (not at boats though) hunting, fishing, 4 wheelers and dirt bikes. Plus the fellow who owns the 80 acres adjacent allows people to use his land. I had a chance to buy it for cheap but no way to access it except to walk to it. Still thinking about it if he offers it again.
 

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We back up to timber company land as well as state park land. We have had very few problems, and we have 125,000 acres we can ride in, hike, hunt or whatever. Motor vehicles are not allowed on the land, allow it is hard for both the state and timber companies to supervise.
 

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I would think a few acres backing up to land open for hunting might be nice for those who like to go out. Probably need to post your own to slow down those who want to walk through for easier access. If I could be across from state land with a view, I'd love that. If I could ever buy something that open, I'd be worried about somebody building opposite and obscuring it.
 

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Our little 13 acre place backs up to State Forest Land. And our place had set empty for a couple years when we bought it.. We had a few folks stop to park in our long driveway, when we first moved out here. And they said that they had been doing that a couple years, in order to walk up into the State Forest by the shorter route.

We just informed them in a friendly way, that we were the New Owners and that we wanted the use of our own Land. It seemed like the word got around pretty quick, because it only happened a few times before everyone got the message.

WE have been out here 11 years now and no one bothers us much, now.
There are a few close neighbors that we have given permission to cross over our land to go Deer Hunting, up in the State Forest, when they asked us. They always stop at the house and ask, before they go across, though. And one fellow has even brought us a couple of big Deer roasts.
Most of our Neighbors are really pretty friendly. It's a good way to be.....
 

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Just living Life
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In NW Oregon my place was bordered on 3 sides with private forest land.... Loved it!!!!
Only close neighbor... not that they were that close... was a Monk.

We did have some issues with poachers... but thy figured out they shot a deer or elk on my place.. and around my horses... they wouldn't get the deer. DH went out and got the deer every time... called Fish and Game and they gave it to the local food bank.
Pretty soon they stopped hunting around my horses. Yes, the land was posted... and it is illegal there to shoot from the road onto private property. Not to mention... dangerous for my horses..
 

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My state has very little BLM land, very little National Forest land, and very little state forest land. But over 92% of this state is forested. It is all private forest land; owned by paper companies, loggers, investors and homesteaders.

Our land is forest except for 1 acre. On all sides we are bordered by parcels that are all forested. None of the bordering parcels have anyone resident. For practical purposes we have full access on all of these parcels.

Our taxes run $1.05/acre for our 150 acres, though we have use of thousands of acres.

We like having so much land available to us.

We like not having anyone living adjacent to our land.

State law here allows anyone to be able to access anyplace accessible by boat. Anyplace that is in flood-plain cannot be 'private property' as law requires it open for fowling. Since our land is river frontage, and we have maybe 25 acres that are in floodplain; anyone can access through there at anytime.

What that translate into is, there are people who trap and forage to feed their families. Many of these people only work p/t seasonal jobs, their household income tend to be every low. Fortunately the Cost-Of-Living in this part of New England is very low.

In the Spring, we see families that travel up/down the river to pick fiddleheads. I have about 10 acres of fiddleheads, so it is not uncommon to see folks out there foraging for food on my land.

Once the river freezes, we begin to see traffic on the river. Some sledders follow the frozen streams for greater access. Anyone with a stream on their land, can use a sled to get onto the river, and from there they have further access to most of the state. Plus this state maintains over 10,000 miles of sled trails, inter-linking every town and township in the state.
 

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"Slick"
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I border Nat'l Forest. Not a problem. Not fenced though.
 

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We are bordered by Nat'l Forest (Mark Twain). Love it. Best neighbors I have ever had or would ever want.

Not fenced off completely but no issues. The best thing so far is that I pay 20 dollars and cut 4 cords of wood (once during the Fall and once during the Spring).

Lots of land to hike and explore. So far we have found an old spring house, a nice hand dug well and several jars and krout jars.

Our taxes before building on the small 25 acres we have were 44 dollars a year, once we built our house they doubled to 87. No where near what we had in Georgia. There is something to be said about country living.
 
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my farm has national forest on three sides. They are a great neighbor in that they mostly leave their land alone and don't bother us. However, on one side we get a lot of illegal ATV traffic on forest land and have had to have the rangers and game wardens come in several times. ALso, until we put up border fence all around our land, we had a heck of a time with hunters assuming our place was part of the forest and open to hunting.

Probably the biggest negative now that we got rid of the hunters/poachers is that when we do need the forest personnel to do something, like giving an OK to clear a fence line, it is near impossible to find the right gov't bureaucrat who will do anything except sit on their fat rear ends and tell you how hard their jobs are.
 

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Instead of our property abutting DNR or National Forest, we are actually two properties from it. So, their properties sometimes are trespassed on, while ours never is. The 5 acres above us is undeveloped and I don't expect the owner to ever build on it. We hope to buy it eventually. The 10 acres next door has just a well and has been for sale for over a year, so currently uninhabited. When it does sell, the building spot is near the top of the 10 acres. On our other side, there is a 5 acre property, parked out, with a nice log home (wide open Strait of Juan De Fuca view). For privacy, we have chosen not to build where we would enjoy that view (save on taxes, too). Instead, we are building where we have the most privacy on our property. The 4th side of our property abridges the paved short country road that connects to our driveway. Very few cars pass our property due to 6 or less property owners past ours. We live off of a spur road, leading from the main road.

Less traffic is often a benefit of living next to or near National Forest land. It helps if you live off of a spur road, not the main road leading in (to avoid the traffic of those camping, hiking, fishing, or hunting). Another benefit, has been mentioned and also shown- views you can see from your property or very close by.
 

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I have no road just a logging trail left over from 1952. I keep it trimmed just enough to to squeeze my little toyota 4x4 down. I like that you need a 4x4 to get to it. It keeps the tourist out.
 
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