propane: LP vs. HP ??

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Paul Wheaton, Jan 23, 2005.

  1. Paul Wheaton

    Paul Wheaton Well-Known Member

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    Last year when I made applesauce, I got a bit frustrated with the electic stove. It was taking forever to heat the sauce. We bought a turkey fryer a few years ago, so I rigged up the propane burner part and put the applesauce pot on that. Much faster!!!

    The hose to the burner has lots of cracks. So I was thinking I should replace it. I found a place that sells it, and they offer two varieties: HP and LP. The LP seems to be what they sell with their turkey fryer and goes up to 55,000 BTU. Their HP goes up to 185,000 BTU. My first thought is to get the HP - hotter can be better, right? But then I thought, what if my propane tank doesn't have high enough pressure (HP) .....

    When looking at turkey fryers on google, it seems they range from 40,000 BTU to 170,000 BTU. And the ones with the higher BTU look like they probably hook up to a regular propane tank.

    So I just use the regular propane tank that is used for any BBQ. Is that HP?
     
  2. caballoviejo

    caballoviejo Well-Known Member

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    I used heater hose and the small wormgear clamps for a car. Worked fine. Pressures low.
     

  3. Windy in Kansas

    Windy in Kansas In Remembrance

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    WHOA! Hold on there Paul.

    Let me explain a few terms that are used with liquified petroleum gas, i.e. LPG, commonly known as propane.

    LPG is a liquid that boils and produces a gas. However unlike water, the boiling point is something like negative 30º. I think that the temp is lower than that but I have forgotten the correct degree.

    Anytime that LPG is in a vessel it boils as long as the temperature is above the boiling point. The pressure that is built up by this boiling depends on the temperature that the tank is exposed to, i.e. such as outside normal temperature. Higher summer heat=more pressure than during a cold winter day.

    The hose to be used for liquid propane, such as the transfer hose I use to fill tanks, is to be a double braided steel reenforced hose with rubber coatings inside and out, blah, blah, blah.

    The hose that attaches to a regulator THEN supplies a BBQ grill, turkey fryer, etc. does not need to be the high pressure hose mention previously.

    Regulators are used to lower full tank pressure to a manageable and usable level. There are high pressure regulators which deliver pounds per square inch of pressure, and low pressure regulators which deliver 13 inches water column pressure.

    I suspect what you are seeing as lp and hp are the regulator designations, NOT the hose specificatoins.

    Low pressure regulators used to be the norm for house installations, but were large and quite capable of delivering enough BTUs for cooking, water heating, furnace, bathroom heater, lpg refrigerator---all at the same time.

    Newer installatons use a higher pressure regulator at the 500 gallon tank or whatever, then the gas is conveyed to a low pressure regulator at the house just before it enters the structure. By using the two regulators a greater flow can be moved through a smaller diameter line, thus saving cost and also adding a measure of safety. I know of a couple of incidences where low pressure regulators failed and delivered FULL TANK pressure to appliances within the house. Naturally going from 13 inches water column to full tank pressure would shoot flames clear to the ceiling.

    Now as to what you need-----? The turkey fryers I have both use red regulators which indicate high pressure. Both are adjustable to regulate PSI of gas going to the burners. I am not saying that is what you have, only what I have.

    Unless you can figure this all out by yourself I suggest you take the current regulator and hose to a dealer and check with them to see exactly what you need. Messing with gas at the wrong pressure can create some real problems--if you get my drift. Sorry that I really can't tell you exactly what you need. I hope some of the information will help however.
     
  4. Paul Wheaton

    Paul Wheaton Well-Known Member

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  5. BobBoyce

    BobBoyce Well-Known Member

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    Now that's a whole different thing Paul. Those are not just hoses, those are hoses with regulators attached. That's different than just changing hoses. I was under the impression you were wanting to change just the hose, not the regulator.

    I'll go ahead and delete my prior post since it's not applicable to what you are wanting to know.

    Because of the BTU rating differences, I suggest you stick with a regulator/hose assembly that delivers the same pressure and at the same or a little higher flow rate as the original.

    Try to be sure to match up the correct fitting to fit your burner as well. You may find adapters difficult to find in some areas.

    Bob
     
  6. Paul Wheaton

    Paul Wheaton Well-Known Member

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    There's the rub.

    So I should find a local dealer and take my existing hose to them rather than buy over the internet, because the connecter for my burner might be different than the connector for their burner. Is that correct?
     
  7. Windy in Kansas

    Windy in Kansas In Remembrance

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    You need to have the pressure match the orfice and burner size. If you push too much pressure through the wrong size of orfice and burner port the flame will raise well off of the port and burn incorrectly, and usually roar.

    I suggest that you stick with the regulator you already have, the burner you already have, and simply have your local dealer replace the hose. Many are banded on these days, and the dealer can simply crimp a new hose over your old fittings--OR--sell you the entire correct assembly that you need.