Propagating Sage

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by Mid Tn Mama, Jul 4, 2006.

  1. Mid Tn Mama

    Mid Tn Mama Well-Known Member Supporter

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    How and when do you propagate sage. For that matter, when do you harvest?
     
  2. Dahc

    Dahc Don't Tase me, bro!?!

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    From seed in the spring time or summer. I suppose you could try and root some cuttings but it's an annual and it would probably not be worth the effort. You can harvest it any time you want but the older it is the more you'll get.
     

  3. Pony

    Pony Well-Known Member Supporter

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    My sage is on its 5th year. Bought the seedling at a local nursery, and just stuck it in the ground. Last year, it rooted off one of the branches (kinda like raspberries do), and it's still growing strong.

    So, maybe sage is technically an annual, but it's been perennial in my zone 5a garden for a while now.

    Pony!
     
  4. Dahc

    Dahc Don't Tase me, bro!?!

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    Pony, are these the same plants or do you think these plants are just naturalising where you are. I ask because although I have grown a lot of stuff, herbs don't seem to be my strong suit so all I know is what I read on the package. If you have a perinneal (sp?) sage going, I would like to know.

    Wait, I just found this here :

    That's what I need, perennial sage. That should be much harder for me to kill. lol.
     
  5. Kee Wan

    Kee Wan Well-Known Member

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    In SD there are no fewer than 15 varieties of sage. Go to California - and you can add to that number.

    Some re-roots form root stock - so when you harvest it, you always want to leave the roots. Others only propegate by seed. So you want to make sure that you leafe the big ones for seeding out.

    WHen to harvest - depends on what you're using it for.....the smalle the leafs and buds, the more iols that are in them - adn the better a smudge they'd make.....for flavor - I'm not sure.

    Most of what I'm familiar with seeds out in August, And the seeding out may chang ethe flavor of the plant.

    I have used and picked sages for most of my life - and I would NOT call myself an expert.....but I think that you just need to be sure that you take what you need so tha tit can seed out an propegate.....There azre just too many varieties for me to know what it is tht you have in your garden.

    :)
     
  6. Pony

    Pony Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Well, when I bought it, it was just regular old annual green sage. Maybe I just got lucky! After 5 years, it rooted that offshoot. I'll be looking to see if I can get it to do it again.

    I have found that the less attention I pay to the herb garden, the better it does, with the exception of consistently pinching back the basil. I admit it: I am a basil glutton! And I know that the more I pinch, the more I get. So I am a Pinching Pony!

    Thyme, rosemary, the rest... I just plant 'em and don't bother fertilizing or anything. They seem to enjoy the challenge!

    Pony!
     
  7. Dahc

    Dahc Don't Tase me, bro!?!

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    ewww, fresh basil on tomatoes in olive oil... and seasalt, mmmm. I am very proficient at killing the basil before I can even plant it outdoors. All the garlic chives died, the rosemary died and a few others are history too. I do have some struggling sage. lol. It's two months old and only 5 inches tall. I feel bad for the herbs I get a hold of. Their number is up then.

    I have no idea what I do wrong and I can grow anything else... but not herbs. I tried taking care of it, I tried leaving it alone, I tried transplants, direct sowing... etc.

    Send us some basil. lol.
     
  8. Pony

    Pony Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Okay. You want it dry, leaf, or pesto? :)

    Pony!
     
  9. culpeper

    culpeper Well-Known Member

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    Sage can be grown from seed sown in spring, or by stem cuttings from firm new growth, or a slip with a heel, or by layering, or by crown division. Refrigeration of seed for several weeks may hasten germination rate. Ideal sowing temperature is 20°C, and it should germinate in less than 2 weeks, but may take as long as 30 days. Seedlings require plenty of water, but develop drought tolerance as they mature.

    Harvest leaves at any time when the plants are flourishing to be used fresh, but before the flowering shoots develop in summer if they are to be dried. Take the stem tips with several sets of leaves. Cut in the morning after the dew has dried, but before the heat of the afternoon. Snip off and dry the whole flowering stems of older plants for decorative or culinary use.
     
  10. MaggieJ

    MaggieJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Garden sage - Salvia officinalis (the one you use for poultry stuffung etc.) is a perennial herb hardy to Zone 5. It can take a full year or even two to get past the spindly stage, so it is worthwhile getting a few plants well-established. Richters Herbs has a great deal of useful information about herbs on their website.

    http://www.Richters.com