professional breeders:how do you choose young bucks?

Discussion in 'Goats' started by inc, Jan 8, 2005.

  1. inc

    inc Well-Known Member

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    obviously i really havent been iinto goats much!
    but you all seem to be having such fun. since there are some big scale breeders here- i had a question that i wanted to ask on the castrating thread but thogt it would not be recieved well.
    breeders- how do you select your future herd sires if you castrate early? is it a bloodline thing, a looks thing(beauty sells those parti-colors, that much i know from livestock exp)or do you save only bucklings entire from planned breedings?
    has anyone saved a buckling out of a group originally for castration- and if so- is there any features to look for that would intice you to save a buckling entire for breeding? superior growth or ...something?
    it seems to me with the smell and all i cant figure out why a lot of pepole who dont buy service from a breeder, why they bother to keep a mature buck and waste pasture space on it. why not just breed with one or more of the bucklings and then freezer him.
    probably an odd question
     
  2. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    North of Houston TX
    Professional...........I had a good snicker with that :)

    For my herd, a doe must have an appraisal score of 89, a E mammary and moving towards her championship or have it for me to purchase or keep a buck out of for my herd. A milk star is gravy. Her dam must be at least this good, perhaps better and the buck who she is bred to must not only carry some linebreeding into the lines I use, but also have a dam that is excellent at least a 90 (I will take an 89 if she is young).

    I would never keep a buck to use on my herd that is pretty, that is spotted, that is cute, that is beautiful himself. A buck who can win in the showring, who himself has high appraisal scores, means absolutly nothing to me if his mother is not all of the above, because the buck throws his ancestors onto your herd, not himself. I would take an ugly buck with a beautiful mother anytime!

    Everyone, whether you have 2 goats or 100 needs their own bucks, because most breeders will not let you outside breed to their best bucks, some will keep a young buck around to breed new customers animals. I breed my customers and close friends animals.

    If you have the right buck he will make you money every year, makes the smell much easier to take....it smells like money ;)

    By the by, my Lynnhaven buck...his dam finsihed her championship this year!! 89 Appriasal with an E on her udder :) TADA!! Vicki
     

  3. inc

    inc Well-Known Member

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    thank you for interesting answer. so its a papers thing in milk animals.

    "If you have the right buck he will make you money every year, makes the smell much easier to take....it smells like money

    By the by, my Lynnhaven buck...his dam finsihed her championship this year!! 89 Appriasal with an E on her udder TADA!! Vicki"

    what part of professional was i not clear on??????

    i was suprised that hte bucks tend to be 'in house only'. i guess i assumed that the prizewinning bucks would have been standing at stud like the horse industry.
    i raise small stock and there is no papers really to worry about there except maybe in rabbits. right now i choose my chicken roos on frivolous basis- but i have chosen small stock studs basically on growth and performance(growth). there is, of course, no milk production to worry about.
     
  4. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    There is a huge market for semen, most good bucks are sold with at least 25 straws given back to the breeder for cost of the collection and transportation of the semen. There are semen tanks going to most major shows, convention and anywhere we gather to transport semen back and forth. The money in bucks is in sales of their kids. Of course if a 'breeder' wants to use your buck especially if they show, milktest, appraise you jump at the chance to let them live service to your does.

    Disease management has to used to protect your stock and your reputation. And as snooty as this sounds, it does me no good for my best buck to drive down the freeway to a farm at 70 miles and hour, live for a month with untested stock, for progeny of his that will never be shown, appraised or milk tested....as is folks who do show, appraise, and milk test with really mediocre stock, do I really want them to be showing my bucks kids only to compete in the last few places in the showring? A buck can only imporve a does kids soo much...they can give your buck a very bad name.

    Just like you choosing to use males who have proven in your herd that they will give you more meat at weaning...I am lucky, ADGA provides us with means of looking up a buck, his ancestors and his daughters and sons to tell us in percentages what he has proven to improve and not. It's the fun of all this, to take all that information, add it to the information I know about what my line does and doesn't do, and mix them together. An impossible addiction.

    Now...my hens have to be pretty, big, even tempered, so my grandson of 2 can collect their eggs, and lay brown eggs :) Vicki
     
  5. Tracy in Idaho

    Tracy in Idaho Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Bucklings are chosen in my herd on the basis of their dams and granddams. Since I am still breeding up, I buy bucklings from herds with does better than what I have. Like Vicki, I want 90+ appraisal scores with E mammaries as far back as possible.

    Color has nothing to do with it, size has nothing to do with it. The dam and granddam on the sire's side have everything to do with it!

    If you only care about getting your does bred and don't fell the need to improve what you have, then that's certainly a good plan. I just can't leave things alone, and I like to see my herd improve every year :) And I've gotten rather addicted to those ribbons, LOL.

    Now that I have started to AI, I would love at some point in the future get to the point that I can AI all that are posssible, keep a buckling to clean up with in the fall, sell him when I'm done, and not have to deal with bucks in 4' of snow!

    Tracy