Problems with making Farmer's Cheese

Discussion in 'Goats' started by oldpaths, Jul 6, 2006.

  1. oldpaths

    oldpaths Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    48
    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2004
    Location:
    NJ
    Hello to All,

    I have a quick question regarding making Farmer's Cheese with our Alpine's milk.

    We have been using 1 gallon of goat’s milk at room temperature, 1 drop of rennet in 1/4 cup water and 1/8 cup buttermilk. It was working great and we were getting wonderful cheese then all of the sudden, I can't get it to work.

    Instead of a nice curd with the whey on top, the whey stays on the bottom and the entire curd section blows up like a marshmallow on top. It smells funny and isn't usable.

    Nothing has changed. I am using the same pan, the same temperatures, nothing different. We are very careful about cleaning everything. I thought maybe my buttermilk wasn't active so I started with a new batch but that didn't work. Then I broke down and bought buttermilk with active culture from the store thinking that might help but the same thing kept happening.

    The rennet is new and we are keeping it in the refrigerator. I just don't know what is happening.

    Any experienced cheese makers out there that can tell me what I am doing wrong would be appreciated! I'm running out of things to try and we are running out of cheese! :rolleyes:

    Thanks so much!

    Lynne
     
  2. JR05

    JR05 Well-Known Member

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    434
    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2004
    Location:
    Mid-West Missouri
    hi Lynne, As to the recipe that you are using. the buttermilk has been changed here in Missouri to a lower fat and I haven't been able to use it. So here is a farmer's cheese recipe that is fail safe! 1 gallon milk, 1/4 cup vinager is all you need then any seasonings you wish to favor the cheese with.
    Heat milk to 200-210* remove from heat and add vinager while stirring. Set for 10 min then drain in cheese cloth. Put back in pot and stir in salt for flavor to your taste and add any thing else you want. You can hang at this time or press . I press in a coffee can lined with the cheese cloth for 24 hours. It comes out in a nice round that is easy to slice and store. Hope this helps.

    jr05 :happy:
     

  3. Julia

    Julia Well-Known Member

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    Jan 29, 2003
    Is it full of lots of little holes? That's e. coli contamination. You're not chilling the milk fast enough in this hot weather, or you're using old milk, or you're not keeping the milk at 30 degrees F. Somewhere along the line you've got some fecal contamination in the milk, and the hot, humid weather of July is making it grow at an explosive rate. And then you get blown cheese.

    There's nothing like summer to magnify any flaws in your sanitation.
     
  4. Laura Workman

    Laura Workman (formerly Laura Jensen) Supporter

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    May 10, 2002
    Location:
    Lynnwood, Washington
    I've had cheese not turn out because it's supposed to incubate at 70-75 degrees, and in the summer my house gets 85-90. Took me a while to figure out that I just can't make mesophilic cheeses on hot summer days. The pigs were happy, though!
     
  5. oldpaths

    oldpaths Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    48
    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2004
    Location:
    NJ
    Hello Everyone,

    Thank you for all the good suggestions. I am thinking it must be temperature related. Since it was mentioned that temperature is an issue. We didn't use our air conditioners this weekend and my cheese turned out okay. Could it puff up if it is too cold instead of too hot?

    I wondered about the low-fat buttermilk as well. I couldn’t find any of the whole milk type, all the brands were low-fat.

    JR05, I am definitely going to try your recipe for cheese with the vinegar. Do you use Apple Cider Vinegar or the Distilled type? Does it matter in the end result? I’ve been looking for recipes that don’t take special starters. Ordering the starters is beginning to get expensive and anything I can do to reduce costs is always a help.

    Thank you so much for taking time from your life to help me with my big cheese marshmallow problem….my family thanks you!

    Blessings,
    Lynne