Problem with Pump Revisited

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by duke3522, May 22, 2005.

  1. duke3522

    duke3522 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    227
    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2004
    Location:
    Indiana
    To update everyone. Several weeks ago my jet pump in my basement started to click on and off quickly. Found that the problem was not enough pressure in the pressure tank. Put more air in tank and played with the pump adjustments to get it working right.

    After a couple of weeks the problem started again so I added more air and decided that I needed a new pressure tank. I bought a 20 gal well saver from Lowe’s.

    I removed the old pressure tank and a bunch of the old plumbing that went this way and that. Put the whole house filter in a place where we can get to it a lot easier. And I installed stops at all the critical points.

    Well the tank is working great, but I need some advice on getting it to run at peak efficiency. The pump is a Red Jacket Jet pump and by the switch it has what look to be two adjustment screws. One large and one small. Right now the pump is cutting out at about 50 pounds, and the pressure tank ia at 45 psi ( tank says safe to 100 psi).

    Can I continue to increase the system pressure until the pump cuts out at 60 pounds?

    Thanks for all the help with the project. Could not have done it with out the help.

    Duke Of Indiana
     
  2. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

    Messages:
    10,854
    Joined:
    May 22, 2003
    Location:
    Zone 7
    jet pumps can and do operate at different pressures such as 40/20, 50/30, 60/40 with the high number the cut out setting and the low the cut in setting. You bladder tank should be set 2 PSI below the cut in pressure. The 100 PSI is just the rating of the tank. The jet pump is not the most efficient of pumps and often they do not like to achieve high pressure. Therfore, I would leave the pump alone. If you wanted to make a good improvement in the delivery of quantity of water and to reduce the frequency of the starts on the pump a larger storage tank would have been a good purchase. Always buy as large a storage tank as the area and the budget can tolerate.
     

  3. VALENT

    VALENT Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,569
    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2004
    Location:
    just west of Houston Texas
    you can definitely adjust the cut in/out pressures to larger ranges if your switch allows it. If you increase the cut out pressure to 60 pounds, the norm is for the cut in pressure to be at 40 pounds. The 20 pound difference being not too noticeable in your house is the reason. However, if you want to increase the life of your pump by decreasing the number of on/off cycles (which is by far worse than constant running for any motor), you could decrease the cut in pressure. You may notice the difference in water pressure more in your house, however. And AGMANTOO hit it on the head--larger storage tanks are always wise investments.
     
  4. duke3522

    duke3522 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    227
    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2004
    Location:
    Indiana
    Hi Everyone,

    Everything is still working fine, and i plan to leave the cut in pressure where it is at for the time being. I do wish I had bought a bigger tank. When i purchased it I thought I would have to put it in the hole the old pressure tank came out of. But as I was redoing things I found that everything would work better if i moved the tank. Didn't think before I put it in that I now had plenty of room for a bigger tank. I will know better the next time.

    Duke