Problem with driveway eroding...

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by jenzden, Jan 9, 2005.

  1. jenzden

    jenzden Active Member

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    During the last two floods in our area the creek flooded over the driveway. it normally is about two to three feet wide and shallow. It comes around a bend and flows into a 2 1/2 foot concrete pipe. We've had big rains before but the water never was more than the pipe could handle. The flood in September and now last week caused so much erosion that our driveway over the pipe is in danger of becoming impassable (sp?). Does anyone have any ideas on inexpensive methods of channeling the water better on the inflow side and shoring up the outflow side? By the way, on the outflow side the water comes out of the pipe into a 8 foot pool before continuing on. We certainly can't afford to have professionals come in and install concrete pillars.
    Any ideas welcome and appreciated...
     
  2. Laura

    Laura Well-Known Member

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    Have you made sure your culvert is clear of debri that may be plugging it up?

    I've seen pretty good results using old tires to build retaining walls along the creek and culvert, filled with creek gravel to build up and re-enforce driveways. They last for years.

    Filled tires can also be used to raise driveways in low wet spots.
     

  3. fordson major

    fordson major construction and Garden b Supporter

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    other than building a bridge you might have to add more culvert. saw a river crossing designed to flood capped with concrete .flooded big rain and spring flood but other wise the water flowed through seven culverts.
     
  4. fordy

    fordy Well-Known Member

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    .....................I'm assuming that this culvert is inserted in the right of way . IF SO , I would call either the county commissioner or the state road maintenance people depending on WHO has responsibility for the upkeep . You need to become a thorn in their side as the Diameter of the Pipe is inadequate to transfer a larger than normal quantity of water UNder your driveway and therefore is causing damage to your property . Don't take NO for an answer , just be persistant and they will do what is necessary to remove you from their Daily routine . Also , I would take my video camera and Record these "overflow events to document the subsequent destruction of your property . In fact , You should video the Current condition as a starting point to document Further Destruction ....UNtil they showup to deal with the problem . fordy.. :)
     
  5. MorrisonCorner

    MorrisonCorner Mansfield, VT for 200 yrs

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    Noel Perrin, years ago, wrote an amusing little essay about the "country code." That unspoken, unwritten, set of manners that "country people" operate under. One of which suggests that calling up the road commissioner and "demanding" might not be the best way to approach this.

    Have you tried calling him and being perplexed? Asking if something up above you has changed which might require adjustment to this particular culvert? It sounds as though you've been there a while and this is a new problem... so maybe something has changed and nobody thought that it might impact on someone on down the line.

    What can "we" do about this will go way further than "this is your job... do something..." which, at least in my corner of the world, pretty much guarantees you'll get on the list, at the very bottom of the list, and the more you gripe, the further down you'll go.
     
  6. BobBoyce

    BobBoyce Well-Known Member

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    I would have to agree with MorrisonCorner, at least in our area. When someone around here becomes a thorn in the side by complaining, the focus of attention is brought upon them.

    If anything at all is found that doesn't meet code, they end up with all sorts of fines and such. The county people here don't like to be made to drive an hour each way from/to the county seat.

    My nearest neighbor kept calling and complaining about me parking some of my vehicles out in my field near the road (with for sale signs on them), and about my ex-RV turned chicken coop. My vehicles all run, and are all registered in another state, except for the chicken coop RV, which has been set up on blocks and qualifies as an agricultural structure.

    He's the one that ended up with a tax fine for having an unlisted, unregistered, RV parked on his property. This state requires all vehicles that are unregistered to be listed for tangible personal property tax.

    Bob
     
  7. Darren

    Darren Still an :censored:

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    If it's your private driveway on your property, the fix is up to you. Realistically if the culvert isn't large enough to handle the flow, the water will backup unitl it can get through the culvert or flow over the road and erode it on the downstream side. I've seen folks try to concrete the downstream side only to have the water undercut and take that out too.

    If the creek is only 3' wide, it shouldn't be difficult to build a small bridge. Depending on where you're located, a bridge can be made of a variety of materials. In this area used well casing and other used pipe is utilized for the beams to span a creek. I've seen 50 and 60' bridge built that way. One family laid the large pipe across and then welded much smaller pipe on for the roadway.

    Some folks have used old railway flatcars for bridges. Timber can always be used. If I was doing that I'd get some timbers that were CCA treated to the marine standard (2.5 rather than the .4 or .6 they used to sell). Those are still available.

    It's really up to your imagination. The frame from a large truck that was junked would work too. With that short a distance old telephone poles would work great. If you do decide on a bridge, build the abutments that the steel, wood, or whatever you use as the beams sets higher than any flood. Build up the approaches so that you have ramps to get onto the bridge. Keep in mind a really big flood could take out the approaches.

    It would help to find out what sort of rainfall intensities your area might receive and how high the water could get in the creek. The local NRCS office might be able to help you with that.
     
  8. jenzden

    jenzden Active Member

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    Thanks to those who have replied...
    We are going into our 8th year on the property. The 'bridge' over the pipe is about 20 feet in from the road so it would definitely be our responsibility.
    As the water receded froom the latest flooding we can see that there is a problem - there must be a clog of some sort in the pipe. The pipe looks full going in but only coming out at about 1/3. Clearing the clog will probably solve the next flood problem but that doesn't help us to fix the erosion on the downstream side. Somehow we have to find a way to reinforce that side by using something. Right now there are old pieces of telephone pole but everything has washed out around them. We will try to scrounge around for more and also some concrete chunks we spotted at a neighbors place. Hopefully they will let us haul it away as they just dumped it over a hill.
    Building a new bridge is definitely not an option!
     
  9. mommymushbrain

    mommymushbrain Well-Known Member

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    Can you tell me more about old tires building up the driveway??? We have a bad problem with a low water bridge that floods really badly. It's due to beavers down the road, and of course they are protected and all that. We got an estimate of $3000 to fix it!!!!! :eek:

    Picture of my driveway during the last flood:

    [​IMG]

    It is 4 feet deep in the deepest spot of the driveway! I have even stalled my car in it before, as I had to pick up my daughter one rainy day.

    Anyways, sorry for getting off topic! :D
     
  10. Laura

    Laura Well-Known Member

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    I don't understand the low water bridge part, but yeah, your driveway can use some building up!

    Used tires are free from the tire shop. Most will deliver if you just ask. As long as the belts are not broken, they are environment friendly in most situations. The only problem I've seen is when massive amounts of tires are used which can result in spontaneous combustion; a slow smoldering and toxic ooze. 1 or 2 layers for a driveway is not a massive amount and will not create enough heat to spontaneously combust.

    To build up a driveway, lay tires flat along the edges of the road and anchor them by pounding in rebar. Place more tires in between like you were laying bricks. Completely fill with gravel and roadbed. If you need it built up higher, course your tires like bricks, anchor the outer row and fill each layer with gravel before starting the next. Be sure to put a good crown over the top.

    If that water is flowing somewhere, you'll need culverts to keep your driveway from being a dam.

    I hope this helps.