Problem with canned goat milk.

Discussion in 'Goats' started by Milking Mom, Oct 23, 2004.

  1. Milking Mom

    Milking Mom COTTON EYED DOES

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    I thought I would can up some of the 4 gallons I have sitting in the fridge. I put on 2 big pressure cookers (7 quarts each) Sterilized jars, filled with cold milk, sat in the cookers, poured in luke warm water, put on the lids (not the jigglers) and turned the fire on really low to bring everything up to an even temperature slowly. When everything was hot I turned up the fire and processed them at 10 pounds pressure for 1 hour. One jar in one of the cookers broke (don't know why). And 5 quarts in the other cooker looks like the milk clabbered or separated or something.
    Have any of you ever had your milk look clabbered or separated? Is it still good? Wonder why that happened? Any ideas? I used my regular quart canning jars with new lids and rings. Everything is sealed fine.
    The milk in the second cooker was probably 3 or 4 days old and the milk in the first cooker was 1-2 days old. Would that have anything to do with it. All of the milk smelled fresh and sweet.
    Hmmmmm..... :rolleyes:
     
  2. Galloping Goats

    Galloping Goats Active Member

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    I don't really know this but since nobody else has answered you I'll put my two cents in. I think when you make yogurt you heat the milk up really slowly so maybe that's what happened. Maybe you heated it up too slow and caused it to change. I hope someone who knows more gives you a more definate answer.
     

  3. debitaber

    debitaber Well-Known Member

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    you proccessed it to long. IF doing it by water bath, you let it go an hour. OR in a pressure cooker, you bring it up[ to pressure, and let jiggle 3 min/s. then turn the fire out. when it is cold in the cooker, it is done.
     
  4. dscott7972

    dscott7972 Well-Known Member

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    10lbs pressure for 10-20 minutes is how we did it last year, no problems, cream and milk seperated after time but no claberation. I think you cooked it too long if their is even a problem.
     
  5. Milking Mom

    Milking Mom COTTON EYED DOES

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    I thought an hour sounded like an extremely long time, but wanted to be safe. I will cut it back drastically next batch and see how that turns out. Thanks for your input. :p
     
  6. NewlandNubians

    NewlandNubians Well-Known Member

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    I have successfully canned milk at 5 lbs. pressure and then turned it off when it reached five pounds. It lasted for over a year and was good to drink. I have also let it go to 15 lbs. and it turned to golden clabbered yuck. Ten pounds for five minutes is a good rule of thumb. Or five pounds for a while... whatever.
     
  7. debitaber

    debitaber Well-Known Member

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    I know several people that use ten pounds, then turn it off, but the milk turns carmel color, so I am going to try the 5#pressure. that sound right. you just brought it up to 5#pressure and turned it off, right?
    thanks , debi
     
  8. westbrook

    westbrook In Remembrance

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    once in awhile a jar breaks. Perhaps there was a fracture, perhaps it touched the side of the canner, it happens.

    Clabbered milk...this one I can not answer except to say...don't use Lemon dishwashing soap!

    Mine seperates...the cream floats to the top, the milk and water seperate and before using I shake it up. I have milk on my self for 3 years, I still use it and it is fine.
     
  9. NewlandNubians

    NewlandNubians Well-Known Member

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    Let me clarify. By caramel colored, I meant a more caramely golden color. If you bring the milk to ten pounds in a pressure canner, it shouldn't turn out what I'd call "caramel color" rather, an off-white. It will still separate over time but can be shaken back up and used to cook with. To get the milk to stay close to its natural color, water bath can it at a nice boil for an hour. As stated before, I have had good luck canning in a pressure canner at five pounds and then turning the unit off and letting the pressure fall naturally (no time at five lbs). This does not leave the milk perfectly white but comes as close as you can get and still safely pressure canning it IMHO.

    Of course the best thing IMHO is to keep the buggers milking through as I do with one or two does that are kind enough to oblige me during the winter, where it can be 15 degrees steady for days and says on end <grin>. I just have to remember to wear gloves to the barn so they don't get cold-handed!
     
  10. BlessedMom

    BlessedMom Well-Known Member

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    Does anyone have the instructions on how to can milk in a water bath in quarts?
    I am interested in doing this. Do you then keep them in the fridge or on a shelf?
    How does it not spoil? I would love to put up some milk now before my doe goes dry for kidding!

    Thanks!

    BlessedMom
     
  11. debitaber

    debitaber Well-Known Member

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    hot water bathe your jars of milk, for one hour. It will keep two years on the shelf.
    debi
     
  12. BlessedMom

    BlessedMom Well-Known Member

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    How will it taste? Do I just pour it in to the sterile jars and put them in the canner?? Won't the jars break if I put very cold milk in them and then put them in the water bath?
     
  13. BlessedMom

    BlessedMom Well-Known Member

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    oh and then would it be pasturized?
    thanks!

    Blessedmom
     
  14. Al. Countryboy

    Al. Countryboy Well-Known Member

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    Dear Mom, We pressured and water bathed in 2003. From what I have been reading on these posts that I my have pressured them too long. We have been opening them along and like the milk that was done in the water bath better than the other. They both have a cooked taste that takes me awhile to get use to, but not a bad taste. It has sort of a pet milk in a can taste. Freezer space is limited so this year I plan to use the 30 half gallon jars that are ordered for canning milk. I will freeze about 4 or 5 gallons and make a soft tpye cottage cheese that is also frozen.
     
  15. BlessedMom

    BlessedMom Well-Known Member

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    Thanks so much!
    Would you like to share the cottage cheese recipe?????
    I am looking for some good but easy cheese recipes.

    BlessedMom
     
  16. debitaber

    debitaber Well-Known Member

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    let the milk get to room tempature, or heat it up hot, but not boiling.
     
  17. Al. Countryboy

    Al. Countryboy Well-Known Member

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    We put about a gallon of milk in our 5 guart pot and slowly bring to a boil, then add about a fourth cup of apple cider vinegar, turn off the heat and stir. It starts fluffing up and separating as soon as you add the vinegar. We dip off the whey to feed to the dogs or chickens and pour the rest on top of a fine woven screen with a handle that we found at the dollar tree store. After it cools some, you add a teaspoon of plain salt and mix it up. We then take one of those gadjets that tupperware makes for making hamburger patties and press some more of the whey out. Taste it while it is still warm, its so good. We usually get about three nicely shaped one and a half inches thick and about five inches across patties. We wrap these separately in plastic rap and then put in freezer bags. We use it on sandwiches, on pizza and in lots of our cooking. We probably put up at least thirty of these flat round disks to use during the winter.
     
  18. BlessedMom

    BlessedMom Well-Known Member

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    Thank you so much! I am going to try this on Saturday!
    I canned 7 quarts of milk yesterday and all seemed to turn out fine.
    Anyone else care to share cheese or other goat milk recipes?

    BlessedMom
     
  19. manygoatsnmore

    manygoatsnmore Well-Known Member Supporter

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    How much head space do I need to leave in the jars when I can the milk?

    Now that the first goat is fresh (first freshener, 11 days into lactation, already giving a 1/2 gallon a day - she's going to be an awesome milker), we already have more milk than the 2 of us can drink! By canning the excess, I figure we'll have milk for the bottle babies already pasteurized and ready to open and feed.

    I froze milk last year, but most of the bottles of frozen milk I've opened have been curdled and smelly (bucky or soured), even though the milk was raw and fresh when frozen. Should I have pasteurized it first?

    Does canning the milk destoy the caproic acid and other acids that cause a bucky odor to develop as goat's milk ages?