Problem milker - suggestions needed

Discussion in 'Goats' started by Nick-n-KY, Mar 14, 2005.

  1. Nick-n-KY

    Nick-n-KY New Member

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    I have a wonderful Nubian doe. She just kidded 2 doelings. She has a wonderful udder and teats. Problem is she won't let anyone touch her teats or udder - not even the kids. They would get under her and she would run away. She cared for the kids well when they were born, and still does, but she wouldn't let them nurse. I had to pin her against a barn wall and hold her legs so the kids could suck. She is now allowing the kid to nurse (one of them died), but she will not let me milk her. She comes to me when I go to the barn, lets me pet her and even nuzzles on me. But the second I get anywhere near her udder she freaks out and runs away.

    Any ideas how I can get her to let me milk her??

    Nick
     
  2. Cindy in KY

    Cindy in KY Well-Known Member

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    Hey Nick. Do you have a milk stand? She needs to be in a stand eating some grain while to teach her to milk. If she won't let you rub her udder and begin to milk, take the grain away. Just keep working with her and talking with her. They do get it after awhile. Let me milk-you get grain. First time milkers are ticklish and don't like it. Is her udder soft, not hard? Be sure to keep an eye on her udder in the following days, so it stays soft, with white milk, no dark stuff. Make sure her udder is not hot. If she just kidded, then the milk is first milk-the colostrum, and it's yellowish and thick for a couple days.

    If no stand, you can tie her head in a corner, with some grain, and just start touching her. You have to check the udder anyway, and if it's that big, one kid won't empty it out. Rub her tummy, they like that, and slowly go back to the udder, then rub the tummy again, ect. I usually wait a week after kidding to start milking the girls, but I do check their udders daily.

    I sit behind my goats when I milk, it's so much easier on my back to sit straight up, and I milk with both hands. This is why we rub the baby girl kids all over so when it comes time to milk, they are somewhat used to it, but some still do buck a little. What part of Kentucky are you in?
     

  3. Nick-n-KY

    Nick-n-KY New Member

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    Thanks for the quick reply Cindy. I guess I'll just have to work more with her. She doesn't even like her belly rubbed. I'll have to try working her with the grain. I give her grain, but she usually tires me out with the kicking and fighting, and I end up leaving and she gets the grain for free...

    I live south of Louisville between E-town and New Haven.

    Nick
     
  4. Cindy in KY

    Cindy in KY Well-Known Member

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    Small world. I live west of E-Town, close to Howe Valley. Yeah, just sit there and rub her till she just gets used to it. She will. Is your little doe doing ok, getting enough milk? I have a little doe & a little lamb in the house, spoiled rotten. I take the doe kid back out in the mornings to her mum. The other kids stay out, as they didn't get used to the warm house, but this ones mum didn't let her milk down for a couple days, so I started her on the bottle, and one thing led to another, and now I'm attached to the bugger.
     
  5. debitaber

    debitaber Well-Known Member

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    I would hobble her. and if you have a milk stand put her up on it. hobble her, and then grain her. milk her while she is eating, after a week or so , she will have the rutine down pat. then reward her with a cookie, and tell her thank you.
    I have had a couple, I had to hobble at first. but goats, are smart, and they learn fast. It won't take long, she will get to understand that she can have grain only if she gets on th milk stand, then tie her in, and hobble her back legs.
     
  6. Kazahleenah

    Kazahleenah Disgruntled citizen

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    EEEKS! never ever give her the grain "anyways" when she behaves that way. In her mind, that's a reward for being belegerant and will encourage that behavoiur. Goats are stubborn, so you have to stand your ground. Be gentle and soothing, and lavish praise (and grain) while she's behaving.... even the smallest moment of it. BUT... when she starts kicking and such.... a harsh word and snatching the grain away usually they catch on real fast.
    Best of luck!
    Kaza
     
  7. debitaber

    debitaber Well-Known Member

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    no hobble her, let her know you are the head goat. she needs t oknow who is boss. buy don't deny her grain. that is what helps to make that milk. my nubians, I have a couple that didn't wnat on th milk stand, but they do now. they get no treat after milking if they are bad. and believe me, they want their cookie, so they straighten up really fast. but hobble her, and talk to her, hobble her back legs really good. she will ge the idea, fast. goats are very smart, it doesn't take long for her to realize who is boss.
     
  8. okgoatgal2

    okgoatgal2 Well-Known Member

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    if this is your first experience milking, it will take time for you to learn. is this her first experience milking? i had one that fought for 5 months, every milking, then just stopped and is now an excellent doe. this goat could dance and eat at the same time, on her two front feet. i learned to keep my arm in a place where she couldn't get her feet in the bucket, it just takes time and patience. be firm (not harsh) not timid when you milk her. talk softly, soothingly, and get what you can get in 2 min and then let her go. over time she'll settle down and you can milk her out, the babies will get what you don't, if they are nursing her. if they are nursing her, make sure that you pet them every day so they don't develop wild tendencies.
     
  9. debitaber

    debitaber Well-Known Member

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    you know another trick I do, is lean into her, alittle with yourbody while you are milking. sometimes the human contact, will keep them from doing the milking jig. I know just how upsetting this can be. I have a bunh that I am milking right new. but I have 3 that just started no getting up on the milk stand, and doing a jig. I just kept talking to them , and when they got up on the milk stand rewarded them, well, now today, all got up. so try this. and see if it will work for you. and be patient. it takes time. lots of it.
     
  10. bethlaf

    bethlaf Homegrown Family

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    you know , i culled a doe today because after two months of constant stand fighting she just would not stand still, she milks great, and the people i sold her to were warned of her stand habits,

    now that being said, i have found that the best way to handle this type of goat is to get her head in the stanchion and get a couple of bungee cords , tie the bungee around her leg, just above the hoof but below the extra toe pads, then make sure it fits in such a way that she can move her hoof , but cant move it forward, you know so she cant kick the milk can , generally speaking a non boss doe will only take a week or so of twice a day milking to get the idea a boss doe might never get the idea and constantly test the cords, then you have a choice, you can finish the season or sell her with the explanation of her troubles, which is what i did, the farm ms Fudge is going to is a commercial dairy, i think with claws and a milk line the problem will be less

    if your other kid is alive that means its getting milk somehow, are you bottleing it , or has another goat "adopted" her, that happened with Fudges doe kid Cesna, my best doe Noel adopted her, in fact when Fudge left today , you would think her kid would be looking for her, but that is not the case, Cesna just went to her other mommy and drank her dry :D
    go figure .

    if you have time and patience handling and talkign will work too, and please dont discount that, in this instance i am talking about a mature doe, who had been milked before, but never learned manners, hence in my opinion why the last folks got rid of her, i hope she performs better for her new owners, if hse doesnt , well then i hope she ends up in the freezer, thats basicly what i told the new owners, if she doesnt work out, call me and i will butcher her for you.
    it would be better than having her get passedon to yet another farm .
    B
     
  11. gccrook

    gccrook Well-Known Member

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    I have a doe that was exactly like that when she kidded for the first time this year. She was my tamest nicest doe before that,a nd still was as long as I did not touch her udder. I tried hobbling her, but was not succesful with that. We milk in a stanchion, an create a routine. I found that If she began her little dance, kicking routine, I just held one leg up for a moment, she couldn't continue dancing. I found it easiest to reach from behind her to milk her, and she began to calm down after a few weeks. It takes patience, and you have to make her dancing/kicking uncomfortable for her, not you. If you have someonoe that can help, have them hold one rear leg up a little. It might work to tie the one leg up off the ground a little so she cannot dance. This doe is now one of my best milkers.
     
  12. allenslabs

    allenslabs Saanen & Boer Breeder

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    My girl Nanny is funny on her left side as it's her fullest. She doesn't like for me to mess with it but I HAVE to or I think it'll pop!! It even is warm in the mornings it's so full. So I'm glad you posted this as I need some help on that one too!!
     
  13. Gailann Schrader

    Gailann Schrader Green Woman

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    She may be ticklish too. Most of my goats don't like their bellies rubbed. They will arch way up to get away from my hands.

    By all means, hobble her. Secure her head, and milk one-handed if you must. Put your head against her right side, with your left hand (I'm speaking about the right side of the goat at this point) and forearm in front of her back right leg. BLOCKING the kick. I'll get flamed for this, but when she misbehaves? Smack her on the thigh and tell her NO. When she calms down? Talk nicely to her and stroke her withers, sides, and legs. Misbehaves again? Smack her on the thigh and tell her NO. I had a wildcat that I milked and she hated me that first week or so. After that? We were fine with one another and she was a wonderful milker. You might try putting the baby on her when she's in the milk stand also.

    JUST DON'T LEAVE HER UNATTENDED! SHE COULD BREAK HER NECK TRYING TO GET OFF THE MILK STAND.

    I also made my milkstand so one side is blocked off. So she can be pushed against the solid side to restrain her...
    Good Luck! You are smarter than her!!