problem hooves

Discussion in 'Goats' started by okiemom, Mar 1, 2005.

  1. okiemom

    okiemom Well-Known Member

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    N.E. OK
    I have a question.

    I have a doe that I bought w/ bad hooves. I mean BAD hooves. I thougtht I could overcome her problems. Is this a wast of time? I have been trying to work on them on and off for a year. Is it possible to correct bad hooves (almost doubled overto the inside)? Her hooves seem to grow faster than can be trimmed. She almost needs a sander/grinder to get after her feet. Can I start trimming once a week to force the blood higher in the hoof? Can bad hooves be fixed?

    She is a great mom has beautiful babies, but her feet are so bad and her coat will show worms faster than the others. We are starting to get a list of goats to cull/sell. Should she be on the list? She still walks normally but it looks painful to me. Thanks Katharine
     
  2. pinemead

    pinemead Well-Known Member

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    You might not be trimming off enough at a time. I did the same thing for a while until a friend came over and did it for me once. I got a good lecture about not trimming enough. I have one that has to be trimmed at least monthly. I have also known people to use a palm sander although I haven't tried it. I wouldn't give up on her yet.
     

  3. jill.costello

    jill.costello Well-Known Member

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    Hi Okiemom- I'm very interested in what you just said about "her coat will show worms..." I'm relatively new to goats and only have my two yearling does (who thankfully have never had any of the nasties I'm learning about on this great forum) So.... how does a coat show worms?

    Thanks! -Jill
     
  4. rhjacobi

    rhjacobi Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Tennessee
    Hi Katharine,

    Some goats are just genetically suited better for different climates and topographies. For example, this doe might do much better with her hooves in a very rocky area where your other does might not do quite as well. Some will genetically have weaker hooves. Sometimes the hooves are so neglected that it takes a long time to get them straightened out. I would try to find someone in your area to help with the question of if you can trim more off each trim. I have trimmed hooves once a week to get some bad ones straightened out. It can take a while and several trimmings. Adding rocks/crushed stone can sometimes help a lot to keep hooves better trimmed naturally.

    The discoloring of the coat could also be from nutrient deficiencies. Is it possible that your area is deficient in something that would make her hooves weaker/softer?

    It sounds like she may not have all the positive charactoristics for your area that the other does have. If she needs a rockier area for her hooves or if she is more susceptible to parasites or nutrient compositions in your area, she might also bo a good one to replace with a doe that is more compatible with your area.

    I would check with a local goat herder about the trimming and nutrients first though.

    Bob
    Lynchburg, TN.



     
  5. rhjacobi

    rhjacobi Well-Known Member

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    Feb 20, 2005
    Location:
    Tennessee
    Hi Jill,

    A goats coat can change colors or loose its luster or its smoothness which usually indicates either nutrient problems or parasites. If they are receiving the proper nutrient supplement for your area, it is probably parasites. A once bright coat can start to look dull which could indicate parasites. A normal coat looks like the hair is in place (smooth or curly). If the coat begins to look like the hairs have been ruffled (out of place), it could indicate parasites. If the coat begins to change colors/hues, such as a black goat showing hair with an orange tint to it or a white coat starting to yellow, it might indicate parasites.

    Bob
    Lynchburg, TN.

     
  6. shorty'smom

    shorty'smom Well-Known Member

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    Feb 17, 2005
    Location:
    northern Oklahoma
    If you don't live in a rocky area where you can put rock in the pen for them to walk on here and there (mine will actually choose to walk on the rock) then you can use bricks, cinderblock, pavers from the home improvement store, or get some quick set cement, follow instructions on the bag and pour some for them to walk over (once it sets of course). I really mean it, it really helps our goats keep their hooves worn down and we have to actually trim less often.

    Just keep after that doe. My buck is a never ending battle sometimes, but we got him set right. He was lame when we got him from his front hoof being too long and folded over.

    I'd like to know really how much can you trim at one time folks? I trim little bits often, but i'm so squeamish sometimes on that buck. I'm afraid I'm going to hurt him. I never cut him till he bleeds. Should I be trimming him harder so it will be less of a constant struggle? He's the only one I have continuing trouble with (and he doesn't want to walk on the rocks or climb our goat mountain rock pile either.)