Pricey cow

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by JeffNY, Aug 4, 2006.

  1. JeffNY

    JeffNY Seeking Type

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    While out taking pictures of one of the cows, the garbage man came. He told us of a sale in Canada, and the top selling cow went for $500,000.00, yes that is five hundred thousand dollars. Obviously this animal will probably be a flush candidate, and will likely be a brood cow for bulls. Here is the question, how do they know this animal will be a good flusher? What if it doesn't flush enough embyros? The calves from that cow, assuming its pedigree is extremely deep, would be worth big bucks. But still, what if she drops dead from some disease overnight? I would never pay that much for a cow, if I had that much to spend. Heck I wouldn't buy anything over 5000. Horses go for 500,000. Not cows!



    Jeff
     
  2. james dilley

    james dilley Well-Known Member Supporter

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    They will have insurance up the wazoo on this cow. I just wonder how many embreyos ,They want to get??And how much they would sell for.. By the way what breed was she??
     

  3. brierpatch1974

    brierpatch1974 Well-Known Member

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    Yep thats a lot of money and you better believe they are heavily insured. I have seen a few top bulls go for over a million bucks. People have more money than they do brains in my opinion.


    BP
     
  4. Up North

    Up North KS dairy farmers

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    :clap: Well Put, BP, Well Put!.....UpNorth
     
  5. tinknal

    tinknal Well-Known Member Supporter

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    A lot of these deals are syndicates. Probably 20 or 30 breeders get together and purchase the cow. Now each breeder can get a bunch of high value embryos for relitivly little cost.
     
  6. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

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    I assume this would be $CN rather than $US.

    First fertile Beefalo bull went for $1M and that was about 40 or so years ago.
     
  7. DaleK

    DaleK Well-Known Member

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    A lot of times in these high-priced sales the full price never changes hands. The buyer will bid up the price, but then the seller agrees to keep a half interest, or else the seller will have agreed ahead of time to "buy" several heifers back for (say) $100,000 each after the fact and give the buyer credit until then. That way the seller can publicize the fact that they sold this high-priced animal and cash in with the family members they still have at home, the buyer can cash in on the publicity of having the animal in their herd and selling descendants, but the money never changes hands except for the auction house getting their cut.