Price of feeder pigs

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by dunroven, Apr 5, 2005.

  1. dunroven

    dunroven Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Hubby and I are trying to decide about getting some feeder pigs to raise based on the formula we saw on this forum and figuring out about making a little to a lot of extra money. We have an 8-stall hog confinement that came with our farm and it is completely intact, practically a new building. We have our rabbits in one stall, a goat in another, and our dogs in another, but will be building some new buildings, if we feel like the pig thing would work for us. Can anyone tell me about how much we should be paying for piglets and about how big they should be when we get them? Also, according to the formula we saw, about 115 days to feed out, if we got them now, that would put it about the middle of July when they are ready to sell. Would this be about right? Would we get the best prices then? I'm needing some best answers here, and maybe someone has already answered these questions. If so, forgive me for not looking far enough back.

    Thanks!

    Valorie
     
  2. bethlaf

    bethlaf Homegrown Family

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    for weaners , that are about 40 lbs, you should expect to pay between 30-60.00 each for them
    assuming youre feeding and keeping them in the confinement area, yes they should be ready to sell in july,or august
    make sure the males are cut, and if youre trying to wring every penny from your feed, that thier tails are docked too
    IMPORTANT
    ask around and take pre orders now though , before you buy , get deposits from everyone , even friends ,
    in fact with only about 5-8 pigs, you should be able to presell them all, assuming youre keeping one or two for yourself with just friends and family if you cant , then i would be very cautious on buying more than you can presell.
    make your decison on how youre raising them
    i assume youre going to use what you have and raise on confinement,
    this is alittle bit more cost effective feed wise, but still expect that you will spend about 65-80.00 each for feed, time and etc.
    this assumes you feed a home made mix , rather than the pre mixed rations that they sell at the feedstore ( the cost per cwt of home mixed over feed store mix is roughly half)
    and that youre goign to give them garden gleanings, and etc.
    your selling price with confinement chemical free pigs should be about 2.00 a lb

    if you pasture you can ask between 2.50 and 3.00 but youre looking at finishing them in september or october, because they will burn more calories and not grow quite as fast.
    make arrangements with a local butcher , or at least get costs and slaughter dates from the butcher to et your clients know when the pigs will be ready, if youre delivering to butcher, then add that cost on as an extra, because gas isnt cheap , and neither is your time

    just my thoughts
    Beth
     

  3. dunroven

    dunroven Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Thanks for the information! We are thinking of selling at sale barn, more than just to friends, etc. We don't know that many people around here, being new to the area, but we want to make this farm as profitable as possible. We live in Iowa, which is a hog state, so I don't know if selling privately will work as well. Anyone with any ideas in this direction? Which is better, stock yard or private sale?

    Thanks a bunch!

    Valorie
     
  4. bethlaf

    bethlaf Homegrown Family

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    private sale is almost always a better deal , listen to the market reports , right now slaughter hogs are only bringing 70.00 per cwt, and since most arebutchered at 200-250 , thats only 150-200 bucks
    selling direct is about the same price,200-250 is normal but you dont have to haul , hope for a good market, etc .
     
  5. dunroven

    dunroven Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Doesn't sound like there is much money then to be made in feeder pigs huh? I thought the way it sounded from others here that they were making good money. I think someone called it a "mortgage lifter"? How are they able to do that, if they are not making any money. Am I misunderstanding something here?

    Valorie
     
  6. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    Volume sales is how the mortgage money is accumulated. Have you considered raising veal calves. More money for fewer animals. You just have to locate a source for heavy breed calves.
     
  7. dunroven

    dunroven Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We have been thinking about somewhere in the range of 100 pigs, since we have these huge stalls, our hog confinement has 8 x 36 foot stalls in it, 6 of those and 2, 12 x 36 stalls, so we figured 100 pigs would be a safe bet in there. It has a cement floor and automatic waterers and cement feeders built into it, a place to open the back for air to flow through, and it is on a slight tilt for runoff. Is that a large enough volume, or is this enough space for that many? Seems to me it might be, but again, I'm new, so I don't know for sure.

    We have tried to find calves around here, but the cheapest calves we found, are $190, and they are a scarcity.

    Valorie
     
  8. bethlaf

    bethlaf Homegrown Family

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    on that scale you can buy feed in bulk which will help costs and all, but still make sure you have a buyer before jumping in like this, youre talking a start up cost in stock/feed alone of over 5k , and if you lose any pigs, then youre already out money ....
    be carefull, it can work great for you if you find a buyer first, the end product should be called for before you go in that big
    just my opinion
    Beth
     
  9. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    2 quick topics
    Have you ever smelled a lot of hog manure? You need to go smell some prior to making a major commitment!
    How are you going to deal with all the manure and what are you going to do with it after it is collected?
     
  10. cybercat

    cybercat prowler of the internet

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    A Hog State I think I would look into another market then. You might want to read up about small farm direct marketing first. Here is a good book that will help alot Making Your Small Farm Profitable By Ron Macher.

    I would do some research about your area and what is lacking. You might find a market need that is not filled that you could fill and make good money at.
     
  11. dunroven

    dunroven Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Thanks for all the great advice everyone. As far as manure goes, yes, I've smelled plenty of it, I've even done some power washing in my day. My sisters, who live too far away to really be of a lot of help, have raised hogs theirselves, and one says it is worth it, one says it isn't, so I'm trying to get some opinions, but boy are those opinions varied. LOL! As far as manure containment, we have a system already in place here. You see, the people who owned this farm before we did, set all of that up and then due to health reasons, they never even got to start. They had to move to where they could be closer to doctors, etc. So, we figured with only the start up cost of the pigs and the feed, (no buildings to build for them, water lines to run, manure collection system, etc), that it might be logical to try it, but I guess maybe we are just not going to go that route. We'll raise a couple for our freezer, and our kids, and I'll keep my day job.

    Thanks everyone!

    Valorie
     
  12. Jim in MO

    Jim in MO Well-Known Member

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    What we've found to work best for us is to sell the weaner pigs. We currently have 10 sows and 1 boar and have it timed out to one litter a month. Our litters are ranging from 9 - 14 live piglets. We sell them for 50.00 each and have people leaving us deposits on the ones that are not weaned yet. We currently have 34 piglets and they are all sold with people calling us looking for more. We have arrangements with a couple of local grocery stores to get their expired produce as well as a bread store. This helps reduce the feed costs and we always buy our feed by the ton which lowers the cost as well.

    This scenario may not be viable for you but it’s really working out for us. We also figure if the bottom falls out of market that we have we can liquidate fairly easily with only 11 breeding pigs. As far as the mortgage lifter part, an extra 400.00 – 500.00 after expenses each month definitely comes in handy.
     
  13. djuhnke

    djuhnke Well-Known Member

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    From a sales perspective you need to think this thru abit. I would try to find a value add to what you want to do. For example, if you raise them on pasture or organically, you can charge alot more. If you sell direct to consumers, you can charge alot more. If you sell the parts (i.e. Dan's bacon and sausage) you can make alot more. But selling widgets in a widget state, kinda hard.

    I would take some of the good advice posted from others and look at other animals or utilize your facilities and look too feed organically and sell them as organic (start small and hook up with a co-op).

    I walk thru the grocery store and laugh at the prices what they charge for organic eggs (put Amish on anything and it will sell).

    Just my thoughts tho.

    Dan