Pregnant pig?

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by caroline00, Aug 1, 2006.

  1. caroline00

    caroline00 Well-Known Member

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    How do I know?

    She is supposed to be due in Sept... do we have to wait until then to know?
    Should we be doing anything special for her right now?

    Thanks!
     
  2. John Schneider

    John Schneider Well-Known Member

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    There are a few things that will tip you off, but not until a few short days prior to farrowing. You will notice her udder swell maybe up to 2 weeks in advance. Also, she may get "sick" and go off her feed and water a few days ahead...then again maybe she won't. Also, a few days prior to farrowing, she will want to build a nest. Give her plenty of straw to do this as that will relieve some stress for her.

    I guess about the only thing you can do now is give her some good quality food with a little extra vitamins and minerals. Don't feed her up though until immediately before farrowing and then follow through with pretty much all she can eat while she is nursing. Give her lots of veggies/hay/grass so she can avoid constipation. She will want to be alone too, so if she is in a small pen with others, it would be best to separate her, but not too far. Right next door to the pen of others would be great. If she is in a big pasture with a few herdmates, she might do well with a farrowing hut of her own or at least some sort of shelter that she can get away to.
     

  3. caroline00

    caroline00 Well-Known Member

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    Thank you!
    she is our only pig right now and seems to like it that way.

    She is also getting a lot to eat because she is getting all our garden scraps, canning scraps, table scraps and corn on top of that....

    should I limit what we give her?
     
  4. John Schneider

    John Schneider Well-Known Member

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    well caroline...I am not sure what to tell you because I am not sure what amounts you are feeding her. You are the best judge. If she is getting veggie scraps etc. then there is probably no serious limitation. If she is getting meat and high calorie proteins and fats (corn could be included in this list), I would watch the amounts. The only real caution here is that a fat pig will have problems conceiving and delivering a healthy, large litter. Not to mention, as in other recent threads here, the problems that can develop with their leg joints etc. Like a human mom...a healthy and sustainable weight gain is acceptable. You can basically free-choice her when she is nursing as the calorie demands are great at that time. Rolls of fat and jowls that flop and flap along with a labouring, lumbering gait indicate an overweight sow. She should look fit and trim and healthfully bigger than when she isn't pregnant. Does that make sense?
     
  5. caroline00

    caroline00 Well-Known Member

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    she is very long bodied... her lines are smooth except for her jowls they are like an old womans upper arm :rolleyes:

    The butcher felt like her siblings could have had more fat on them so I wont worry at this point.

    Thanks
     
  6. highlands

    highlands Well-Known Member

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    A couple of weeks before farrowing our sows start getting sway backed a little bit.

    Their breast line starts showing and they gradually bag up as their due date approaches.

    A day or so before the will farrow I can milk them and get a few drops.

    At this point their vulva is swollen.

    If possible will see a quiet private space away from the herd in an unused den or off in the brush along the far sides of the paddocks.

    They begin next building with hay, grass, dirt, twigs, leaves, etc. They'll look for a place where there are evergreen branches overhanging them to give them shelter.

    Ours almost always farrow in the early morning, sometimes before I am around. I do not interfer execpt in the most dire situation. I want mothers that can do it themselves and I breed for that in our herd of 30 sows. I let nature takes its course to a large degree.

    I do provide hay, water, food and protection in the form of our guardian obedience dogs. Those same god dogs clean up any still born piglets reducing the threat from predators.

    The sow often won't eat or even drink water for the first day or so.

    Provide her with a quiet space, plenty of fluffed up hay or straw (4bales), food in a dish, fresh water in a dish. If she is trained to a nipple water the be sure you ha

    Lastly, choose a location that is private for her, lets you check on her adn allows forr seculcionlkkkkkkkkkkkkkllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllkkkkkkkkkk