Pregnant Doe is Shaking, What does it mean?

Discussion in 'Goats' started by ajharris, Oct 22, 2006.

  1. ajharris

    ajharris Amanda

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    My nubian is very preg. I have no idea when she is due, but it look like any time. She has the terrible shakes. Her rear legs is where it is worst. Is this a sign of labor? :shrug: If not what causes them to shake like that?

    TIA

    Amanda
     
  2. Blue Oak Ranch

    Blue Oak Ranch Well-Known Member

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    This is magnesium deficiency - also called lactation tetany or grass tetany.

    You need to get her some CMPK or MFO (use the stuff that doesn't burn, for oral use - I like the MFO). Give her 30ml MFO as a drench daily until the twitching stops. You might have this happen after she delivers, too - keep a close eye on her. The kids may be born with magnesium deficiencies as well - so give them 5-10ml orally at birth. I don't know the dosage for CMPK.

    Get her some good loose minerals, preferably with a 2:1 Calcium to Phosphorus ratio (that means the calcium should be twice as much as the phosphorus). I use the Sweetlix 16:8 Meat Maker goat mineral, and it works really well for my goats. They didn't do well on the Hoeggers.

    MFO is cheap - $4 or so for a quart bottle - if it's not available from your feed store, you can order it from Jeffers online and they'll get it to you fast.

    Cheers, and good luck with her!

    Katherine
     

  3. ajharris

    ajharris Amanda

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    Why would she have a mag. deficency if she has minerals all the time? I don't understand. I use the same minerals as you do. At first I thought she was cold. LOL stupid me. Thanks for the reply
     
  4. Caprice Acres

    Caprice Acres AKA "mygoat" Staff Member Supporter

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    Does she have a bag? Couldn't it also be Milk fever? I heard that shaking is a sign of milk fever...
     
  5. ajharris

    ajharris Amanda

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    She is starting to bag up. What is Milk Fever? I have had goats before but none of them were meant to be for reproducing they were just pets. What can I do if it is milk fever?
     
  6. goatkid

    goatkid Well-Known Member Supporter

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    What you are describing is either ketosis or milk fever. This isn't so much about whether or not you are giving her minerals than it is a metabolic problem due to the way her body is processing the minerals she is taking in. Liquid CMPK or MFO is good if you have that. She should also be given injectable CMPK or Norcalciphos subQ 30-60 cc per day and oral propylene glycol 30 cc orally twice a day. If you don't do something quickly, you will lose her. I wish you the best.
     
  7. AllWolf

    AllWolf We love all our animals

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    I'm not expert but here are the signs of Milk Fever and Signs of ketosis also..

    Symptoms of milk fever: During the onset of the disease, your doe may appear unsteady and weak as she walks. As milk fever progresses, she may lie down, which can advance to a coma and death.

    Treatment and Prevention of milk fever: If you notice any of these symptoms, contact your veterinarian immediately please do not put it off because it means life or death of your doe. Treatment involves administration of calcium. However you CAN take preventative measures to lower the incidence of milk fever.

    Now the Prevention of Milk fever: For your doe goat safety avoid diets high in calcium during late pregnancy and avoid the use of alfalfa as the only forage source during the dry period. Does usually have a good supply of calcium stored in their bones that can be used when needed. However when the does diet is high in calcium is fed, the doe may fail to use the stored calcium since it is already abundant in her diet. Then, when milk production begins, the does calcium requirement dramatically increases. Since the does body has not used the calcium stores from her bones, her blood calcium level plunges below normal, resulting in milk fever.

    ==========================================================

    Symptoms and treatment of ketosis: Goats may decrease feed intake and milk production. They may become lethargic with dull, rough coats. A sweet odor can be detected on their breath, in the urine and in the milk that indicates ketones are being released. If left untreated, this condition can be fatal.
    If you suspect ketosis, call your vet immediately. Treatment is usually successful. To meet the energy demands of milk production after birth, be sure your does are fed a high quality diet. Slowly increasing the daily amount of feed before kidding helps insure your does have sufficient energy levels to meet lactation demands when the kids are born. Energy demands will continue to be high as long as does are producing milk. Always feed lactating goats according to production for the duration of lactation.

    Research has shown low quality diets tend to increase the incidence of ketosis because the energy levels in the diet are not sufficient to meet the energy needs of the lactating doe


    Good Luck.. Hope Your Doe Gets Doing Better Soon.
     
  8. AllWolf

    AllWolf We love all our animals

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    What is milk fever? Milk fever is a noninfectious disease that occurs at or soon after kidding. It is brought on by lactation after birth.

    Now what causes milk fever: The sudden increase in calcium necessary for milk production after birth can drastically decrease calcium levels in a doe. The goat may fail to mobilize stored calcium reserves in her bones during pregnancy, especially if a diet high in calcium is fed prior to birth.

    Forgot to put that in the other post..

    Good Luck with your Doe :)
     
  9. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    Please go to dairygoatinfo.com and read Sue Reiths articles on hypocalcemia. It's in the goatkeeping 101 site. Goats die of ketosis only after having been missdiagnosed and not being treated for hypocalcemia. The products to treat it are cheap, and while they are coming in read her Wallmart med thread that shows you how to treat it with Wallmart meds while your products are coming in from jeffers.

    Also does she have access to hay? They keep their body temp up by eating roughage.

    Where does she get her calcium from in her diet? Alfalfa hay or alfalfa pellets? Vicki
     
  10. Caprice Acres

    Caprice Acres AKA "mygoat" Staff Member Supporter

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    I thought I read somewhere it can happen at any time during milk production... Not just at or soon after kidding. Trying to remember where I read that... Somewhere online!
     
  11. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    Yes we have had a doe come down with milkfever, all my fault, I was pushing her for more milk production for a show coming up :flame: she was about 12 weeks fresh. Vicki