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If I need a Shelter
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok thoughts on this.We're wanting to pour a 12'X32',4" thick Slab.Thinking of just putting down my Gravel Bed,just not right up to the edge.Put Forms up and use some Old Cattle Panels for my Wire.

Will this work?

big rockpile
 

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Rockpile,

That will work. When I was still at home we built a 24 x 36 garage and did exactly what your planning except we used rebar. Now 34 years later it still doesn't have a crack in it and we would park loaded grain trucks on it overnight if it looked like it might rain.

Bob
 

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If I need a Shelter
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks I was thinking it would.We've basically dug Footing before.I am going to make sure I backfill once its cured.

big rockpile
 

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I agree about any renforcement in concrete being good money spent. You can't take the cracks back once they have started. I hate wasting my time. The cracks will still be there long after any additional money spent on reinforcement steel is forgotten.
Around here they have a 7 yard min. or they tack on a delivery charge over and above the mud price.
Check with your supplier. It may be near the same $ to pour an approach pad out in front of your proposed building as it would be to pay the additional delivery charges.
Before ever I pour concrete I make sure and lay in a couple of runway pipes of PVC to accomodate future needs for expansion.
I was glad I put in a floor box in my shop. I later placed a piece of machinery (hydralic shear) in the middle of the floor, and was glad I didn't have to find a way to get elactricity to it.
One other thing that has been good, was that we put an inch and a half step down at both rollup doors. It keeps any water from coming in during a driving rain or if water collects out front on the approach pad.
I hope that this helps. Good luck
 

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Here in Florida they will crack with wire or with out. I poured mine when it was nice and cold out never did crack but it took all day to set up.
 

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Unpaid, Volunteer Devil's Advocate
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Cattle panels won't grip like rebar, but still way better than nothing.

Even if you get cracks in the concrete, mesh keeps it from lifting very much.

I figured that a 4 inch slab would take 4.741 cubic yards. You are going to want more concrete allong the edges, aren't you? How about an approach out in front of all doors?
I'd rather waste a half yard of concrete than run short. Create some places where, "if concrete were free, I'd..." so you can use some extra if you have it.
 

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If I need a Shelter
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Cattle panels won't grip like rebar, but still way better than nothing.

Even if you get cracks in the concrete, mesh keeps it from lifting very much.

I figured that a 4 inch slab would take 4.741 cubic yards. You are going to want more concrete allong the edges, aren't you? How about an approach out in front of all doors?
I'd rather waste a half yard of concrete than run short. Create some places where, "if concrete were free, I'd..." so you can use some extra if you have it.
Yea I figured for more in front of the Door.Its going to cost us around $600 give or take.I didn't figure thats too bad.

We are adding on to our Cabin.I was thinking of putting wood floor in but there is not enough clearance from the ground up to give us 8' Wall and enough pitch on the Roof.

The place is going to be 22'X28' my wife says this is going to be enough room.I sure hope so.But we're getting rid of a bunch of stuff and some of the stuff we need can be put in a Shed we're building.

big rockpile
 

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I'd remove any soil (sounds like you did) get it down to something more stable. If you can get a plate tamper to pack the gravel all the better.
 

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Once I was seven years old
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Best friend decided to skimp on any reinforcement whatsoever (tried to warn him...) when pouring a concrete slab on one half of his garage. It is the side he parks his Ford Diesel on when he's out of town for work all week. Now, less than 6 months later, he already has a fine little crack running the length of his truck in the concrete. Whatever you do, don't skip the reinforcement.
 

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Here in Florida they will crack with wire or with out. ...
I don't get it. There are no structural engineers in Florida who can design slabs that will stay intact?
 

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I don't get it. There are no structural engineers in Florida who can design slabs that will stay intact?
If it has wire or not most the time it will still crack. Has more to do with how much water is added and how fast it sets up. They stay intact. If you look in the expansion joints on any floor or drive the cracks are down in them.
 

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Poured a 30x30 for my garage a few years back. Used fiber mud. No wire or bar in it. On the thin side due to the grade its 4 inchs and 6 on the main floor. Used a 5 bag mix also. It was poared in 2 15x 30 sections. the next day I went ahead and scored each section into 3 pieces. Cuts were about 2 inchs deep. No cracks after 4 yrs. If it does crack it will fallow the scores and be nice and straight. Oh and by the way you need to seal fiber mud if you plan to lay on it. Nasty picky stuff if not.

With this being a addtion to your house I would dig a footing. But, here we have to due to frost.
Bob
 

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agmantoo
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wire and rebar will hold the concrete slab in place after the crack. There is no known means to prevent the cracking entirely. The expansion slots are there to control where the concrete does crack and thus making the crack less obvious. If it were me, once I had everything ready I would place heavy poly sheeting between the concrete and the earth. The earth moves and without the poly the concrete is rough and adheres to the earth or stone base and IMO contributes to cracking. Having a moisture barrier is a nice benefit particular if the use of the slab may shift from a patio to a sun room floor over time.
 

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I remember driving on a highway in the former Eastern Germany in the early 90s. The highway was built in the 30s so at that point it was about 60 years old, and this being in commie hands during the previous 40 years it got something like 0 (zero) maintenance. Now except for some slabs that shifted 1/2" up or down over the years I could not find any faults with the surface. If it wasn't very dark gray and weathered I'd have though it was just newly built. I had two guesses - either the Germans knew some secret of pouring concrete, or, maybe they got a bullet in the head for coming up with excuses why the job was not done right the first time. Or maybe both ;)
 

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I'm an old concrete man. Just an extra comment, if you sprinkle the concrete for a day or so after pooring, it will look new for 30 years., Bleached white. I mean, set a soft sprinkler on it and keep it cool for a day or two.
 

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What Manfed is saying is you need to cure the concrete. Otherwise it may dry out and not develop full strength. There's also spray on curing compunds that will do the same thing and eliminate the need for keeping the surface wet after the concrete sets.
 
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