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Discussion Starter · #41 ·
I don't know how many breeders are required, or if there is a requirement. ALBC is not the final word on any breed, I've found them to be completely non-helpful in general, so I never even bothered to talk to them about potbellies. The pork Council too is unhelpful since they are not interested in anything other than a national market, and could not care less about the homesteading issues.. I'm sure a peta psycho would not want to be part of a livestock conservancy. Have I got anymore what? breeders interested, or pigs for sale? Tusk extraction or regular trimming is a must for pet pigs, but not for livestock, same for sterilization. The typical "potbelly" that most people have seen is a potbelly cross. A true potbelly, when fed a proper non-obesity leaning diet, at full grown shouldn't be over about 130 pounds. I usually butcher at about 9 months, at that point they are usually 60-80 pounds, to get that last 50-60 pounds of meat takes another 3 years, whereas 2 young ones cost a lot less to raise than 1 full grown size. Have you read the section on potbelly pigs at my website? www.windridgefarm.us ?


breezynosacek said:
We would be interested...after talking to hubby about it he said that if I felt that strongly about it he would support me.

My question is this, do potbelly pigs qualify for conservancy? There have to be so many breeders available and I don't think petpiggy breeders would count.

http://www.albc-usa.org/wtchlist.htm

If I became one that would make three locations, have you got anymore?

Oh, and after I told hubby that most of the pet piggy breeders had their tusks removed, his eyes lit up. He said he knows of a potbelly pig farmer around here. Or at least he thinks that's what they are. I'm wondering if they are standard wild boar. Anywho, I will check with this farmer and see what he has and see if it is purebred or crossed. He could have been given somebody's pet pig or something since we live in farming area its hard telling.
 

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GeorgeK said:
I don't know how many breeders are required, or if there is a requirement. ALBC is not the final word on any breed, I've found them to be completely non-helpful in general, so I never even bothered to talk to them about potbellies. The pork Council too is unhelpful since they are not interested in anything other than a national market, and could not care less about the homesteading issues.. I'm sure a peta psycho would not want to be part of a livestock conservancy. Have I got anymore what? breeders interested, or pigs for sale? Tusk extraction or regular trimming is a must for pet pigs, but not for livestock, same for sterilization. The typical "potbelly" that most people have seen is a potbelly cross. A true potbelly, when fed a proper non-obesity leaning diet, at full grown shouldn't be over about 130 pounds. I usually butcher at about 9 months, at that point they are usually 60-80 pounds, to get that last 50-60 pounds of meat takes another 3 years, whereas 2 young ones cost a lot less to raise than 1 full grown size. Have you read the section on potbelly pigs at my website? www.windridgefarm.us ?
Yes, you have a very, very nice sight.

Have I got anymore what? Yes, breeders. But if your not worried about ALBC guidelines then you don't have to worry about it.

I'm sure a peta psycho would not want to be part of a livestock conservancy. I would hope not, that would defeat the purpose, LOL!


Have the peta psychos really attacked farmers? Or just picketed and lobbied against them? Oh, and stomped chickens on video.

Sorry to sound neive here, was off line for about a year so I haven't kept up on the goings on and urls and sites dissapear overnight.

The last major event I recall is the Klamath Basin fiasco and I don't know what eventually happened to them.
 

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"Have the peta psychos really attacked farmers? Or just picketed and lobbied against them? Oh, and stomped chickens on video."

The President of the ADGA was charged with animal cruelty last year by his very own ranch hands. He runs a goat dairy. PETA encouraged the charges (I read the e-mail exchange on one of PETA's alert websites) and has facilitated the process. I haven't stayed current with the trial but he stepped down as Pres. There are plenty of cases where animal rights-oriented people (new neighbors, visitors, people looking for trouble) have caused small and large homesteaders at least a lot of grief and at times a bit of money and time fighting charges. They are not all PETA members perhaps but PETA fuels a lot of more extreme domestic terrorist types like ALF.
 

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Tango said:
"Have the peta psychos really attacked farmers? Or just picketed and lobbied against them? Oh, and stomped chickens on video."

The President of the ADGA was charged with animal cruelty last year by his very own ranch hands. He runs a goat dairy. PETA encouraged the charges (I read the e-mail exchange on one of PETA's alert websites) and has facilitated the process. I haven't stayed current with the trial but he stepped down as Pres. There are plenty of cases where animal rights-oriented people (new neighbors, visitors, people looking for trouble) have caused small and large homesteaders at least a lot of grief and at times a bit of money and time fighting charges. They are not all PETA members perhaps but PETA fuels a lot of more extreme domestic terrorist types like ALF.
Okay, thanks. Talk about enemies in your own household!
 

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GeorgeK said:
yes, Tango, if it isn't too much trouble I'd like a recipe. You are correct according to everything I've read. The only problem with pork is the fattiness, but most people have never seen a healthy, lean pig, which is the norm here
Here's my recipe. It is tweaked from the American Harvest book. This does for 1.5 pounds of jerky. I cut the meat into very thin steaks. 1/2 c of worcestershire and soy sauce. 1 oz. tomato sauce, black pepper and curry (I use Jamaican curry)powder to taste (I mix all the ingredients before adding the pork) 2 cloves of garlic mashed, and one packet of curing salt. I add the pork and let it marinade overnight (about 12 hours) , turning it over several times. Then I dry the steaks on a paper towel and set them on the trays. At 155 it takes four hours for four trays to dry. Yummy! :)
 

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I just got given to me four potbelly crosses. 2 male 2 female one ready to drop a litter. One has tusks. All are bigger than the mini pot bellies.

Questions:

How do you move 4 pigs that weigh about 200lbs and one has tusks and one is pregnant???

We got a pickup truck, will they stay in the back without enclosing it or will they jump out at the first stoplight we run into?

I'm hoping they aren't all lard babies because of the crossing. These evidently were her mother's pigs and she inherited them when her mother died. She doesn't know much about them other than they are potbellies but not miniature.

They are free, so I don't really care. If nothing else, I get some lard and some babies to start fresh with. I will see what breed they are when I go and see them.

Now, we told her we would try and be over to get them by the 15th so that she wouldn't have to keep feeding them. The one with tusks gouged her.

I would appreciate all of the help and suggestions you can offer.
 

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They should be moved in a livestock trailer which is low and easier to move them into. See if you can rent or borrow one. They will definitely jump out of an open pick up truck- not to mention how you'll be able to get them up there. Could be interesting :eek: Ask for them to be penned for picking up if she can do it. I doubt she is too keen on doing anything with them - I wouldn't be with a gouge. Pigs move easily with feed especially feed they like. Treats like All Stock 12% Sweet or hog meal with molasses or cooked chicken, corn etc. They will move your way for food- the gouger and the pregnant one too. Make sure they keep cool and entertained on the ride home.

If these were pets at one time and then relegated to livestock they might be fatty but you may be surprised. Don't know too much about Potbellies. GeorgeK raises them - I think I just have one or two with some of the genes mixed in. Depending on how you are with the male who gouges, you might keep him for stud or send him to camp. I don't have the tolerance or capacity to deal with aggressive animals. Personally I think the miniature potbelly pig is a load of bull. They all get big. They are miniature by comparison to a domestic pig but a 200 pound pig is not miniature anything. They will need a strong and sturdy pen .

Since this is a new start for them I'd keep the pregnant girl with the other female and keep the two males away from them. Ask for her farrowing date, if known it will help ease your mind. Four free pigs is a great opportunity. You can start all over with the babies or you can see how things work out with the adults. Once they are home you'll have time to consider the possibilities. Getting them home should be loads of excitement - keep us in tune :)
 

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Tango said:
They should be moved in a livestock trailer which is low and easier to move them into. See if you can rent or borrow one. They will definitely jump out of an open pick up truck- not to mention how you'll be able to get them up there. Could be interesting :eek: Ask for them to be penned for picking up if she can do it. I doubt she is too keen on doing anything with them - I wouldn't be with a gouge. Pigs move easily with feed especially feed they like. Treats like All Stock 12% Sweet or hog meal with molasses or cooked chicken, corn etc. They will move your way for food- the gouger and the pregnant one too. Make sure they keep cool and entertained on the ride home.

If these were pets at one time and then relegated to livestock they might be fatty but you may be surprised. Don't know too much about Potbellies. GeorgeK raises them - I think I just have one or two with some of the genes mixed in. Depending on how you are with the male who gouges, you might keep him for stud or send him to camp. I don't have the tolerance or capacity to deal with aggressive animals. Personally I think the miniature potbelly pig is a load of bull. They all get big. They are miniature by comparison to a domestic pig but a 200 pound pig is not miniature anything. They will need a strong and sturdy pen .

Since this is a new start for them I'd keep the pregnant girl with the other female and keep the two males away from them. Ask for her farrowing date, if known it will help ease your mind. Four free pigs is a great opportunity. You can start all over with the babies or you can see how things work out with the adults. Once they are home you'll have time to consider the possibilities. Getting them home should be loads of excitement - keep us in tune :)
I was more worried that the pregnant one would drop early if she got stressed out. If she is overweight that is stress enough but we don't know anybody with a livestock trailer as we just moved down here.

Yeah, I'll keep you in tune! :haha:
 

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Maybe if you can't find a livestock trailer, you have or can borrow some extra large dog crates? Don't try just using a canopy on your pickup either. That's a good way to get home with no pigs and the windows broken out of your canopy, from what I hear.
 

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Discussion Starter · #50 ·
The lard is really great for dep frying, the trick is don't wait til golden brown, pull out your deep fried items when you hear a sudden increase in the sizzle, that's when the water is being driven out of the food, and soon thereafter the lard will be sucked in.

I've found the lardies should be removed from the breeding program, they tend to not make good mothers. It might take a few generations, (2 years) but if you cull based on performance and not color, size etc you should have a nice farm pig. Good Luck




breezynosacek said:
I'm hoping they aren't all lard babies because of the crossing. These evidently were her mother's pigs and she inherited them when her mother died. She doesn't know much about them other than they are potbellies but not miniature.

They are free, so I don't really care. If nothing else, I get some lard and some babies to start fresh with. I will see what breed they are when I go and see them.

QUOTE]
 

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GeorgeK said:
Tango makes a great point about your pen, do you have some sort of enclosure ready?
We are working on that and figuring it out. I discovered something. When I talked to the lady (a little elderly) she told me that they were 'supposed' to be potbelly pigs but they turned out to be bigger. My interpretation of that was, they are crossed with something else.

When hubby called to get directions, she told him that the guy that sold them to her stated that they were all pure bred pot belly pigs!

So, we are going out to see exactly what we are getting, so that we know what size building and fencing they need. We have the perfect place for them and we also have a friend that is going to help that said he (his family) has had pigs about before.

I'm thinking if they turn out to be overweight, since I have time before it is cool enough to butcher, I might put them on a diet if they are overweight. See if I can get some of that fat off. If nothing else it will help the sows when pregnant to be on a healthier diet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #53 ·
breezynosacek said:
she told me that they were 'supposed' to be potbelly pigs but they turned out to be bigger. My interpretation of that was, they are crossed with something else.
That seems to be the norm in most areas due to unscrupulous breeders trying to increase numbers too quickly.


breezynosacek said:
When hubby called to get directions, she told him that the guy that sold them to her stated that they were all pure bred pot belly pigs
Not likely since true potbellies are small, max about 125 lbs for a big boar.

breezynosacek said:
So, we are going out to see exactly what we are getting, so that we know what size building and fencing they need. We have the perfect place for them and we also have a friend that is going to help that said he (his family) has had pigs about before.
What are you planning for pen and or pasture, and shelter, water etc?

breezynosacek said:
I'm thinking if they turn out to be overweight, since I have time before it is cool enough to butcher, I might put them on a diet if they are overweight. See if I can get some of that fat off. If nothing else it will help the sows when pregnant to be on a healthier diet.
Pasturing works well for that since they have to work for their supper, a daily tastey treat in the same spot will train them to your paddock
 

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GeorgeK said:
Not likely since true potbellies are small, max about 125 lbs for a big boar.
Really? I was offered a pot belly pet (neutered male) about two years ago and did some reading and I came up with a lot of different opinions on ultimate size. Some going up as much as 400 pounds (so I didn't accept him). It is an interesting pig, imo, one that is just starting to show some potential in its real niche here in the U.S. A 125 pound pig is not too bad.
 

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Discussion Starter · #55 ·
I usuall ybutcher at about 9 months, about 70 pounds or so, it takes 3-4 years to get to 125



Tango said:
Really? I was offered a pot belly pet (neutered male) about two years ago and did some reading and I came up with a lot of different opinions on ultimate size. Some going up as much as 400 pounds (so I didn't accept him). It is an interesting pig, imo, one that is just starting to show some potential in its real niche here in the U.S. A 125 pound pig is not too bad.
 

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GeorgeK said:
I usuall ybutcher at about 9 months, about 70 pounds or so, it takes 3-4 years to get to 125
Well, I started to post this yesterday but when I got here my computer exploded with viruses an trojan horses!

We went to see the pigs...

The youngest one looks like those on Georges pages. :)

The other three look like those poor miserable things you see where the pigs are being fed ice cream, ect but they are a little healthier looking. They are able to run and walk quickly. Their legs are visable and although they have a little bit of fat around the eyes, I have seen a lot worse online!

So, we are investigating hog pens and hog panels, hog fencing, ect.

One of the local companies has hog fencing that has 2 x 4 12 gauge on bottom and a larger hole on top. It is several feet high.

Only problem with that is the cost which we can't afford right now and hadn't planned on needing 300' of fencing. At least not yet. Right now, at least until spring, we should be able to get by with a smaller area. They aren't going to be roaming as much. We will slaughter two of them this fall and the two that are left plus the litter that should be born will house the area.

Our biggest problem right now is trying to find a way to transport them. Pickup is too tall.
 

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At what time can they be bred Geroge? This information is very interesting.
 

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breezynosacek said:
Our biggest problem right now is trying to find a way to transport them. Pickup is too tall.
Try looking for an open high-sided U-Haul trailer. You can rent them locally for something like $15/ day. Cover the top with a tarp or sunscreen to give them shade and give them hay to munch on. Good luck with them. It is exciting to hear others getting into something so cool like this project is.
 

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Discussion Starter · #59 ·
try large dog crate per pig for transport?

Breeding is dependant upon the pig, males are usually fertile by 3-6 months, yes those tiny little things! Females sometimes might get pregnant by 2 months (not healthy) generally by 6 months. The occasional pig that can get pregnant too young is not a good idea, these mothers tend to be poor quality, and sickly. One option is to separate boars from sows early (lots of work when dealing with tiny things in a pasture) or just let nature take its course, identify the sickly, poor quality mothers and remove them from the breeding program, which has been my approach
 

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GeorgeK said:
try large dog crate per pig for transport?

Breeding is dependant upon the pig, males are usually fertile by 3-6 months, yes those tiny little things! Females sometimes might get pregnant by 2 months (not healthy) generally by 6 months. The occasional pig that can get pregnant too young is not a good idea, these mothers tend to be poor quality, and sickly. One option is to separate boars from sows early (lots of work when dealing with tiny things in a pasture) or just let nature take its course, identify the sickly, poor quality mothers and remove them from the breeding program, which has been my approach
I don't have a large dog crate but the open Uhaul trailer sounds pretty good if I could find one in the area.

I read on one site that the males could breed as early as 6 wks and should be fixed before then by some of the pet breeders. Of course they have an agenda. They don't want anybody cutting in on their profits. On another site I read that the females will breed at 3 mos. So, I figure I will try and get them separated if possible...when the time comes.

Oh yes, I really am wanting to do this...and maybe, hopefully, we will still come up sometime and get some fresh blood for the herd.
 
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