potbelly pigs

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by GeorgeK, Apr 14, 2004.

  1. GeorgeK

    GeorgeK Well-Known Member

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    I've been raising Potbellies for meat for years, does anyone else out there do that? They are extremely efficient on a small scale. If you are interested in a livestock conservancy for potbellies check out 2 sites www.windrigefarm.us and www.greenerpasturesfarm.com
    George
     
  2. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    George, I have a razorback/potbelly cross that I received in a group of mixed breed swine destined to be snakefood. She was very pretty so I kept her. She is due to farrow in May from my razorback boar. I've never had potbelly pork but I think that crossing it with razorback will yield delicious meals. I was just lamenting to my best friend that we have no small pigs to butcher and roast this weekend. :( They are much more economical to raise for me than domestic pigs and they are far more manageable. I think it is a fairly untapped market with a rewarding potential for the small family homestead.
     

  3. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    BTW, I love the Greener Patures website. That philosophy is very similar to mine. Thanks for the link. :)
     
  4. mamajohnson

    mamajohnson Knitting Rocks! Supporter

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    We raised/slaughtered about 3 generations of pot bellies.
    Wonderful meat, although we let one boar get too old and man, he was musky.
    But, lots of lard and meat from the sows.
    Just about all the animal I can handle to dress out on my own. The last one was about 200 lbs, wonderful meat. Try not to feed too much slop, they just taste better if they have some good feed. Dont seem to be as "greasy" either.
    We put our last pig in the freezer just a couple of months ago. The freezer went out a couple of weeks ago, so I think I may be lookin' up a potbelly in the future..... just to feed out and slaughter.
    Great for feed/meat conversion as far as I am concerned.
     
  5. Don Armstrong

    Don Armstrong In Remembrance

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    Anyone who's interested in "small, manageable" pigs who do well on grazing pasture, rather than being fed to the gills on concentrates and grain, may be interested in looking up "kunekune" (Maori) pigs. They are small, friendly, manageable, max out at around 200 pounds or a bit over. One of the nice things is that if you do look into it and do it, you may for once get "ahead of the curve" and get in on a "breeding and marketing" boom just before the prices have gone sky-high.
     
  6. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    I looked for Kune Kune last year. I think it is too late to get in on them inexpensively here. They are an exotic pet in south Florida and expensive to purchase. I could adopt some from shelters but I don't like to lie and say they'll be pets. As for looks they are more beautiful than the potbelly, imo.
     
  7. You are preaching to the choir.
    George
     
  8. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    :eek: I can go on and on about some things. Glad to find some company. :)
     
  9. barbarake

    barbarake Well-Known Member

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    I'm interested in the potbelly pigs also, strictly because of their size (couldn't handle much larger and couldn't eat much more :) )

    Does anyone know if they would be suitable for pig roasts?? Or would they be too fatty and/or small??

    (Around here they call them "pig pickin's". That's when you roast a whole pig for around 12 hours in a big gas grill. My brother-in-law made one of these grills and we used it for several pig roasts years ago. I don't know if he still has it (know him, he probably let it rust away) but I could get another one if necessary. I was thinking that that might be a profit-making idea for the future - doing pig roasts for large parties.)

    Anyway, I have about 1/4 acre of woods close to the house that I could fence off and let them range there. Also, the local grocery story has said that I could have all the stuff they trim off in the produce section.

    (By the way, that's something any homesteader might want to check in to. I live in a very rural area and I would have bet lots of money that someone was already getting the produce trimmings. But I figured it couldn't hurt to ask and they said no one was getting it and I was welcome to it. Hurrah!!)

    I'm also thinking that I could use the produce trimmings to raise worms - sell the worms to fishermen and their castings to gardeners.
     
  10. They are great for pig roasts! If they are pastured they will be lean and considered a meat pig, if penned they are more lardy. The key is to age the meat in the fridge for a week prior to roasting. MMMMMMM AAAHHHH
     
  11. mamajohnson

    mamajohnson Knitting Rocks! Supporter

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    Just dont let them get too heavy for the pig roast.
    (but you probably knew that) the smaller pot bellies arent quiet as fatty.
    also, that good chill is a must! really improves the flavor.

    Round here, it is a dead run race to get those grocery scraps. Everyone wants a piece of that action! :haha:
     
  12. james dilley

    james dilley Well-Known Member Supporter

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    the only pot bellies i've been around weighed close to 250pounds at three years old and they was some mean rooters. the boars got together once man talk about a fight. long story short there some one elses problem now the garage mechanic where i lived in ohio wanted them (they were free to him) talk a bout a chore loading them, never again i'll shoot them first. then its saugage time.
     
  13. GeorgeK

    GeorgeK Well-Known Member

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    250 pounds is either not a potbelly or one with over half its weight in fat. Either could be possible, a lean healthy potbelly won't get over about 90 pounds on average, 125 at the extreme, and that would take 4-5 years to get there, that's why I usually butcher at about 9 months or approximatley 60 pounds. If you feed it cappuchino and ice cream it will get obese. The problem as Tango mentioned most people get crosses because the pet pig people tried to cash in on the old pyramid scheme and bred them out to other breeds to increase their numbers quickly. Most people now have crosses. It took me three generations to breed back to docile potbellies.
    GerogeK
     
  14. mamajohnson

    mamajohnson Knitting Rocks! Supporter

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    I have seen (owned) some Large pot bellies. They do come in all sizes. I dressed out one sow that was only about 1 1/2 yr old, weighed in about 200 pounds. I got approx 4 gal. of lard off her, sure. But, she was fed like a pig..... not on hot cocoa and bagels. She ate veggie scraps and corn and hog feed. I also know she was a pot belly. We dressed out her brother 8 months earlier, and he weighed in a good 100+ pounds. They were taller than other pot bellies I have had.
    Did some research once, Ive seen them in a range of sizes.
     
  15. I can not believe that people would be so hard up for food that they would kill such wonderful family pets! It makes me sick to think of all the loving potbellies that have been butchered! There are so many other means for meat! Potbellies are bred for companionship and love! You who slaughter these wonderful creatures have serious issues! How could you! I HOPE YOU ALL CHOKE TO DEATH!!!!
     
  16. GeorgeK

    GeorgeK Well-Known Member

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    Another retard who cant figure out the difference between a farm site and a pet site.


     
  17. GeorgeK

    GeorgeK Well-Known Member

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    Unregistered unknown humanoids who think pigs are worth more than their human children are the most evil spawn from hell

     
  18. james dilley

    james dilley Well-Known Member Supporter

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    George K, i agree with you, in fact the potbelly pig is known as the veitmanese potbelly, it is a slaughter pig in asia, and was brought here for a research animal, it seems researchers would rather handle a snall pig up to 160# (potbelly) versus the standard type up 1000# max. weight. when are these unregestarted peta people going to be brave enough to let us know their names and location, i use my right name . they hide behind and in the shadows , because they fear daylight. and real people knowing who they are. the simple fact is GOD put the pig here ,as same as other animals for man's benifit. not for them to be elevated to human status. sorry about the long post.
     
  19. I'm sure they have a heck of a time on the Asian sites condemning them all for eating cat and dog!
     
  20. GeorgeK

    GeorgeK Well-Known Member

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    I agree. I like them for their ease of butchering, and they don't tear up the pasture as bad as other pigs, because of their size. I think the flavor is better too, but that is probably more because they are pastured instead of penned.