Potbelly pig Question? Any Breeds out there?

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by airotciv, Apr 25, 2006.

  1. airotciv

    airotciv Well-Known Member Supporter

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    A friend of mines DIL just got a baby potbelly pig. She just paid $700.00 for this Teacup? Potbelly. Well when talking to the friend, he tells me that the baby is on a limited diet, so it will stay small. Does this mean they are starving this poor animal to keep it small and if so, what kind of a breeder would do this? I don't want to start anything between breeds here. But would like to understand. If I'm totally off base, I will let it go. I'm just wondering if I should be concerned. Thanks.
     
  2. KSALguy

    KSALguy Lost in the Wiregrass Supporter

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    we had an instance a few years ago where some people near our community had "pot belly pigs" that they would sell, but when people got them home and they started eating like a normal pig should they grew into normal sized pigs, these people were just starving the breeders to stunt the growth, they turnd out to be a potbelley mix.

    obviously i dont know what these pigs might be, but potbelly pigs should stay comparitivly small regardless, and any controle you may have over an animals size (growth related) not counting over weight, would be starvation in my book.
     

  3. crystalniche

    crystalniche Well-Known Member

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    There is a man here who has the purebred potbellies and they are small already. I don't think there is a teacup type that is purebred is there? He also told me that if the pig is any color other than black it has been mixed somewhere in its background. I think he has about 40 or 50 of them. He gives the babies away or sells them very reasonably even tho they are so small so that sounds like an awful high price for one to me. I was going to take one but the upkeep is pretty high and they can become biters.
     
  4. spam4einstein

    spam4einstein Well-Known Member

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    wow! P.T. Barum was sooo right!
     
  5. Laura Workman

    Laura Workman (formerly Laura Jensen) Supporter

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    Pure potbellies can have white as well. Check out the Mong Cai pig and I pig, which are breed that potbellies came from. They have the classic markings you find on black and white potbellies. Potbellies also have short, upright ears and STRAIGHT tails. If the tails are curly, the pigs are crossbred. Potbellies do stay small, like the size of a Golden Retriever, but with really short legs. Some folks make them stay even smaller by severely limiting feed, and particularly protein which promotes growth. Since they're pigs, they're much heavier than a dog. I suspect that my adults probably weigh between 80 and 100 pounds at three years of age, although I've never weighed them.

    Here's a good link for potbelly origins: http://members.aol.com/FOREPAUGH/origins.htm
     
  6. Earthbound

    Earthbound Well-Known Member

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    I have 2 purebead potbellies, petunia and Wilbur and they are roughly 50 lbs a piece. I got them from a VERY reputable local breeder and they are mostly black with a few white marking on their heads, sway backed and very sweet.
    corry
     
  7. airotciv

    airotciv Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Thanks everyone for the info. I'm not going to be concerned. I know nothing about pigs. Just needed to ask the experts out there. So thanks again.
     
  8. PETSNEGGS

    PETSNEGGS Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Laura, thank you so very much... that was really interesting info. I got a potbelly in March and we just love her. She is still real skidish when you walk by her or God Forbid you try to pick her up. But, we jsut keep trying to love on her when ever we can. Can you tell me where I can get supplies for her? Our local feed store sells potbelly pig fed but, that is all.
     
  9. Laura Workman

    Laura Workman (formerly Laura Jensen) Supporter

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    What kind of supplies do you want? Mine are essentially farm pigs, so don't need leashes, etc. They eat from rubber feed pans that I've bolted to clips on the fence so they can't easily tip them or run off with them.

    I feed my potbellies 16 percent hog grower, or a mixture of alfalfa meal, goat milk and dry cob, sometimes with a handful of minerals thrown in. Or if they can forage in a decent spot with lots of nice leaves and roots, I throw them whole corn, spread wide. Keeps them entertained. Also, they get weeds from the garden, extra eggs, etc. Oh, and PLENTY of exercise!

    I am NOT the pig or potbelly pro, that's just what I've been doing. So far so good, all things considered.
     
  10. GeorgeK

    GeorgeK Well-Known Member

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    Potbellies are just a breed (technically a landrace rather than a breed, but not many know the difference) of meat pig that are smaller on average. If they've not been crossed out, and are not obese, they should not get over about 120 pounds for a boar and about 100 pounds for a sow. ( mine are usually in the range of 60 for sow and 80 for boar) They come in 4 color patterns, Solid black, white with black spots, black with white feet and tail and tuxedo, (white collar or white flare on the face of an otherwise black pig.

    700 bucks? man! What a rip off! The so called teacup are merely stunted by being malnourished. Feed them right and they will not stay small. Potbellies are also a little odd from the mammallian standpoint in that they continue to grow long after they are fertile. They can take 5 years to reach full size. This "teacup" breeder is most likely showing off sows that are only 5-8 months old.

    Still, an 80 pound pig can be very dangerous. I saw one litterally pretzel a cattle panel, and it was not angry, it just felt like an opening was needed in that part of the fence. (My bottom clip was too high, and he was able to get a bite on it)
     
  11. GeorgeK

    GeorgeK Well-Known Member

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    potbelly "chow" is a way to make chumps pay more. Just get cheap dry dog food, or if it is pastured, all you need is some whole kernal corn, and let her forage for the rest. Maybe a little salt here and there too


     
  12. airotciv

    airotciv Well-Known Member Supporter

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    GeorgeK, This is why I asked the question, are they malnourished? The DIL insiste that Bella is not. She is 3 weeks old and gets feed formula 4 times a day. This breeder (we live in a very small town, 300+) is known by everyone. But know one new he breed potbelly pigs. :shrug: The DIL says that Bella will only be about 40 pounds. Very small for what I have researched.

    Spam4, I had the same thought. :)
     
  13. Unregistered

    Unregistered Well-Known Member

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    In many areas you can get pot-belly pigs for free. They are for sale many times near here for $10 each. If given all they will eat they tend to become fat. Some will die from excess weight. It is very hard to get them to loose weight after they have gained it. They need very little feed.
     
  14. HobbyfarmingMO

    HobbyfarmingMO Member

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    A very good pot-bellied pig site is www.healthypigs.com. We have the book they advertise on their site and it's a great resource. We only feed Rosie pot-bellied pig food. However, it is expensive ... we fed her a variety of other things ... sweet feed and pulverized corn (not at the same time). She had a lot of problems when she was on the other food ... she acted sickly on and off. She had good days and bad days, but always had diarhea. Ever since we've switched strictly to the pot-bellied pig food, she's been great and no intestinal upsets. Another thing is that I know other pig owners who feed their pigs dog food and their pigs are huge ... they think it is a result of the dog food diet. Rosie will be one year in July. She is compact, but rock solid ... probably weighs 100 pounds.