Potatoes on St. Patrick's Day?

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by BJ, Feb 23, 2005.

  1. BJ

    BJ Well-Known Member

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    I'm getting anxious....it won't quit raining in Missouri...the garden is too wet to till....we need to plant potatoes on St. Patrick's Day. Someone told us never to till when the dirt is wet or you will not be able to properly work the ground. How can you plant the early crops, lettuce radishes and potatoes if you can't till the garden? :confused:
     
  2. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    Sounds like a good time for no till raised beds.
     

  3. Bruce in NE

    Bruce in NE Well-Known Member

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    "we need to plant potatoes on St. Patrick's Day."

    Why do you "need" to plant them on that day? They'll probably just rot in the ground. I don't plant them til around May 15. They mature way before frost anyway and are more likely to come up.
     
  4. BJ

    BJ Well-Known Member

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    Hummmm...I'm just going by what the gardening books recommend....and most have said to plant potatoes in March...but probably will wait as I don't see anything growing much until the ground warms up. :)
     
  5. Windy in Kansas

    Windy in Kansas In Remembrance

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    If you don't plant potatoes on St. Patricks Day you won't have new potatoes ready when the peas you planted in February are ready. Peas and new potatoes simply go together well.

    Another reason for planting them early is to get good growth on them before the Colorado potato beetles show up, if they do. Getting out of sequence with other folk planting the same crop also works.

    The growing degree day table shows that growth for potatoes is negligible when the temperature is under 40º.

    I have had potatoes setting on the roots by April 1st. When breaking the crust on soil I made the discovery and photographed it. I called the local newspaper and got an April Fools day headline. The potatoes were planted earlier than St. Patricks day as we were having an unusually warm spring (zone 6).
     
  6. Mutti

    Mutti Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'd plant them in a shallow trench and mulch heavily with straw...we are in MO. and had wonderful potatoes last year...but lost 4-80' rows when it rained and rained and rained in the fall and they rotted in the ground. Plus, if you plant in March you still need to plant late potatoes or you might have trouble storing them for long....we try to have alot of fall maturing crops as it stays hot/warm here way into Oct/early Nov. and root cellar not cold enough to keep stuff. DEE
     
  7. WisJim

    WisJim Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Up here in Wisconsin, we plant some potatoes on Good Friday (which is always the proper moon for planting potatoes, even though it varies a lot by date), and my wife will just mud them in without tilling. We usually just till in the fall, if there is a lot of debris that needs to be mixed in a little to help prevent erosion and to help it decompose better, so we don't worry too much about spring tilling in most of the gardens.

    Jim
     
  8. Corky

    Corky Well-Known Member

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    I plant my potatoes around St Patricks day because I want those new potatoes and I want them out of the ground before they are baked potatoes.
    One year I didn't get them dug up before it got too hot and they baked and exploded in the ground. :haha:

    I also live in MO in zone 6. It is hard to keep them all through the winter when they are the spring crop.
    Another fall crop would help you have potatoes longer and the potatoes wouldn't form till it cooled off some. That is if you have plenty of water to get them through the dry season. I don't. I get most of my vegtables put up by July and then except for tomatoes and the never ending green beans I let the bugs have the garden through the dry months. Grass hoppers are a real problem here and the squash bugs that I can never win against. I have a organic garden so no pesticides. I get really tired of my garden by August anyway. By then I have plenty put up and I just let friends help themselves to anything that is left. I have plenty of tomatoes to share by then too.