Potato Question... yeild

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by dragonflyz9C, Jun 3, 2006.

  1. dragonflyz9C

    dragonflyz9C Well-Known Member

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    I am planning on planting potatoes for the first time this year (I know it may seem late for many of you folks, but I'm in zone 3 and it's just starting to get nice here). My question is how many do I want to plant? Is there an average yeild/per potato plant? I have to buy them buy the pound... how many should I order? :shrug:

    THANKS!
     
  2. katydidagain

    katydidagain Adventuress--Definition 2 Supporter

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  3. dragonflyz9C

    dragonflyz9C Well-Known Member

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    I really wish people would give a person the benefit of the doubt.... :nono: I read through today's postings in the gardening section to see if there was a current topic re: potatoes and believed that I was posting the question in the proper forum.

    Are you having a bad day or what? :grump: Try and take it out on someone else please... I don't need negativity today.

    Thank for the link though...I guess something positive came out it.

    Thanks
     
  4. bob clark

    bob clark A man's man

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    most people around here say they will produce 10x what you plant. up north you may not get that
     
  5. Pony

    Pony Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Like Bob said, about 10x what you plant, but since it's your first year, don't be too disappointed if you don't get quite that. Even with minimal yields, however, there is nothing in the world that tastes as good as a home-grown, fresh-picked spud! YUM!

    Are you able to find earlier types of potatoes? I would think that your season is pretty short... How many frost-free days do you average?

    Pony!
     
  6. katydidagain

    katydidagain Adventuress--Definition 2 Supporter

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    Mea culpa! My "snit" wasn't directed towards you, DF. I remembered reading that thread the other day and thinking it belonged here not there. I guess this forum moves so slowly that people get discouraged.

    Hope your day got better.

    katy
     
  7. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    Katy, that was indeed a good thread! Sorry that I didn't reply to it since I'm one who usually would answer most potato questions. Just too busy with my own 150 or so hills of potatoes and didn't see that thread on Melissa's forum. I hope that she forgives me for only having time to pop in on this one now and then.

    Now, there were two questions which were asked in the original post on this thread and which were not covered in the very informative linked thread. First was: "....how many do I want to plant?" Too much missing information there. One would need to know how much ground is available, how many people in the family, how often potatoes are eaten per day or week by each person and storage capabilities. In other words, how in H--- would anyone know the answer to that?

    The second unanswered question was: "...how many should I order?" That reverts back to question number 1. Since the desired harvest is unknown, the quantity needed to produce such an unknown quantity also can only be an unknown number!

    Expected production was covered but I can state almost any figures and back them up. I can say 5# of seed should produce 50# of harvest, which is the normal minimum. Or, 5# of seed should produce 500# of harvest but I'll keep that to myself.

    There, now you can be angry at me as well as Katy!

    Martin
     
  8. susanne

    susanne Nubian dairy goat breeder

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    i planted potatoes the last two years and did not had that great result. this year i planted 25# seed potatoes. everything comes up great looking, never saw them this uniform. wondering what do i do with all the potatoes in fall? :rolleyes:
     
  9. Looking4ewes

    Looking4ewes Well-Known Member

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    Great link, thanks! I'm gonna run out and buy me some straw!
     
  10. Oxankle

    Oxankle Well-Known Member

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    Let my story be a warning to you all.

    I planted about l5 pounds of potato eyes in three long rows out in a back garden next to a pasture. They came up Soooo well and I harvested the first new potatos two weeks ago. Looked like a bumper crop.

    Then I sprayed my pastures to kill the blackberrys. Now my potatos look burned and scraggly, though I never got within 50 yards of them.

    They may pull out of it, but I may have lost the crop. Never again.

    By the way; I read somewhere that in good soil and in a good year you might expect 5# of potatos per plant. I have gotten near that some years. We can plant here in late Feb. If they come up before the weather is settled we simply shovel soil over the sprouts and let them come up thru it again. The usual planting date is St. Pat's day, March l7.

    The real danger here is drainage. The potatos must be in rows that drain well. I plow up a raised bed for each row.
    Ox
     
  11. dragonflyz9C

    dragonflyz9C Well-Known Member

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    I believe that "put off" would better describe my state of being with regard to Katy's post... You? I think "annoyed" might be more fitting, not quite "angry". If you look at the title of my original post, you will see that what I was looking for was answers that would give me an idea of how much a potato plant would yeild on average... which would allow me to answer my own questions regarding how much to plant and buy. Note that the others that responded to my posting were able to decifer my rediculous posting with all of it's flaws... and give me the answer I was looking for. So maybe, you aren't smart enought to figure it out? or you're just crabby old fartlooking for someone to tick off? or maybe you are attempting make yourself look smart by tearing someone else down...whatever the case, I just wanted to thank you for my first "bad taste" of my experience on this usually wonderful forum. (Please read last line with much sarcasm.) :bow:
     
  12. ladyrua

    ladyrua Well-Known Member

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    Um....not to hijack this thread...but I have another potato question that's related to the original one:

    I planted in an 8'x4.5' bed, four rows across, eight down (so roughly one potato per square foot). They're growing like crazy (easily 2 feet high now) and I'm worried that I overplanted and won't get anything at all from them - is there anything I can do? From my understanding (and past experience), they usually vine out and lay on the ground, but the leafy part is so dense, they're just growing up, not out!!

    Did I completely muck this up?

    Thanks all!
     
  13. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    Katy was being her usual helpful self and got slapped down as a reward. Anyone does that to any of my forum friends here, they'd best be prepared to get a harder slap in return.

    MARTIN
     
  14. ladyrua

    ladyrua Well-Known Member

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    Uh...okay, never mind guys, I'll just try some websites I guess.
     
  15. VALENT

    VALENT Well-Known Member

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    ladyrua, potatoes grow up not out(at least all of mine have) Just give them time. The only problem I see with your situation is that you have not hilled up over the plants as they grew. They may not produce as well because of that.
     
  16. ladyrua

    ladyrua Well-Known Member

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    Thank you Valent! I did hill a little over them as they were first sprouting up, but probably not as much as I was supposed to!

    I guess we'll see!

    Thanks
     
  17. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    This will not apply to Ladyrua's 2006 problem but something to remember for 2007. I've just returned from working on 25 hills of German fingerling potatoes. Since they had been removed from cold storage only a few days before planting, there was uncertainty as to when they would break dormancy. Therefore, instead of planting them deep in trenches, these were just barely covered so as to take advantage of the warm air and sunlight. With nearly all showing a few green leaves this morning, it was time to prepare them for the job of producing tubers. About 2" of soil was pulled over them for a slight mounding effect. Next were 2 bags of fine-shredded oak and maple leaves. That was topped off with a thin layer of soil, just enough to hold the leaves in place. Now the rows are long mounds about 8" high. Thus the green leaves of the plants are buried under all of that. No problem as they will find their way up through that. That can only be done when potato plants are 2" or less.

    For those plants which have gotten to 2' high and sprawling all over, not much that you can do unless you've got a supply of some type of fine mulch. It would have to be something fine enough to work between the plants without covering them. Shredded leaves works great but you'd have to think about that in the fall when the leaves are available. If you have a mulching bagger mower, you can make such a fine mulch out of a bale of hay or straw without making too much of a mess. That can be easily worked in between the plants in lieu of hilling with dirt. Cram in at least 3" for moisture retention. It will seem to be a lot but will reduce down 50% after one good rain. It will not do much of anything to increase production since any plants that tall will not be growing any more stolons. They've made all that they ever are going to.

    Martin
     
  18. tallpines

    tallpines Well-Known Member

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    Let's keep it friendly, please!

    Happy Gardening :)