Pot Belly Cross

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by dezeeuwgoats, Dec 12, 2006.

  1. dezeeuwgoats

    dezeeuwgoats Well-Known Member

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    Well, Petunia is finally big/old enough to be bred. I bought her to make some pb/farm type hog crosses with. Problem is, Petunia isn't the sweetest of pigs, so I will probably butcher her when she's done raising the piglets, unless she has a change of heart. :rolleyes:

    Can I breed two of the offspring together, or should I outcross - if we are planning on eating the resultant offspring? I'd rather not breed back to a full pb - due to bringing the size down too small, and I want to avoid needing to keep a farm hog boar. Do I need to go to the trouble of crossing two completely different sets of pigs in order to have unrelated male/female crosses to work with?

    I've not bred that closely to anything before - so I'm a bit wary. Even though we'd be eating the offspring, I'm not sure if there would be problems with hardiness, mortality, etc breeding so close.

    Thanks;
    Niki
     
  2. GeorgeK

    GeorgeK Well-Known Member

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    If you are just interested in the meat and not breeding for intelligence, then that should be fine. Culling for disposition is also a good idea like you are already planning. The mean sows have a tendency to kill and or neglect the piglets so you will have to be a little vigilant. I've found that "motherhood" does not improve a mean sow's disposition.



     

  3. dezeeuwgoats

    dezeeuwgoats Well-Known Member

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    Thanks GeorgeK - I was hoping you'd find my post!

    Niki
     
  4. KSALguy

    KSALguy Lost in the Wiregrass Supporter

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    in breeding is not the devil, you will be fine, especially sence you can eat any mistakes, just cull heavy and ONLY keep the BEST for breeding, and you will be fine, Inbreeding is used ALOT and as long as you know how to pic the BEST and cull the REST you are ok.
     
  5. dezeeuwgoats

    dezeeuwgoats Well-Known Member

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    KSAL - I do use line breeding/inbreeding with my dairy goat herd - but I've not bred full siblings together, so wasn't sure about that particular aspect. I usually have more distance between breedings.


    Thanks;
    Niki
     
  6. mamahen

    mamahen Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Don't want to hijack, but I have a question about inbreeding/line breeding pigs.

    My husband said his grandpa used to breed pigs. This was small scale back in the 50's. Like 5 or 6 total hogs. I guess someone jumped the fence & the resulting offspring had major deformities. Like one eye, 2 heads, something along those lines. Of course he destroyed them all, but said it was because a son bred mom, or 2 siblings bred. Not sure which.

    Could this happen?
     
  7. Natureschild

    Natureschild Well-Known Member

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    The way I have heard it is, you can breed mothers and sons, fathers and daughters, uncles and neices, aunts and nephews, but not siblings, or copusins with each other. Genetics work better that way.
     
  8. bbbuddy

    bbbuddy Well-Known Member

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    I once read an article by a vet about inbreeding , where he stated that the problems were WAY overstated.
    That if with "normal" outbreeding you get 1 % born with a problem, then with severe inbreeding you might get 2% born with a problem. Now that's a 100% INCREASE in birth defects, which sounds terrible, but in reality you get 98 good babies instead of 99 out of 100...

    I'm just using these figures as an example, I don't remember the exact figures, but it was something like that, to show that the fear of it is way overstated.

    We let a brother and sister pbp breed, because that was all we could find around here, and they were also a product of alot of inbreeding. The babies are fine. We ended up with 3 out of 7, because it was the sows first litter and she didn't let down milk in a timely manner, plus she laid on one, so I expect the next litter to be more successful, but all the piggies looked fine....

    That being said, we also finally found an unrelated sow and her two piglets, so we don't have to continue severe inbreeding.
     
  9. GeorgeK

    GeorgeK Well-Known Member

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    yes it can happen and given enough generations of inbreeding it will (not necessarily those particular defects, but some defects will show up. Most defects will result in decreased fertility because of one problem or another (stillbirths, miscarriages, small litters etc). If your long term goal is to populate an island for the next 100 generations, it will be a problem. If you want to just keep a pair of siblings to provide meat for 10 years and then get a new pair or a new single partner then it is unlikely to be a problem