Pot Bellied pigs for meat? Fat?

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by Unregisteredn, Jan 4, 2005.

  1. We like a lot of people started out with PBP as pets, but since our first pig, we have now moved to a homestead farm in VA. For the past couple years we have been selling there offspring for pets, but have always wondered if they would be good for the table.
    I've been searching the net and have found some good info, and a lot of conflicting info.

    I don't want to do the larger pigs, well because they do scare me. (childhood thing) but dont have that problem with the PBP.

    I know there's a lot of fat, but what all can you use the fat for besides cooking?

    I've seen a lot of people that are cross breeding them also. What would be some of the best cross breedings, for a small pig?
     
  2. inc

    inc Well-Known Member

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    cross breeds= that would be interesting. maybe to a good lean bacon type? sounds like a good breedig project.
     

  3. GeorgeK

    GeorgeK Well-Known Member

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    dont cross them. Unless you have a market for lard. A PB is a good small meat pig. A dressed out carcass (minus the head, entrails feet and skin) is about 50% of the live weight. The crosses I've dealt with not only deposit a large amout of subcutaneous fat but also heavily marble the meat, leading to the myth about 15 pounds of meat on a PB. Think about it. It is beyond the bounds of logic, physics and biology for a 300 pound animal to be mobile and only have 15 pounds of meat. The problem is it is too heavily marbled and the average home butcher is going to toss that "meat" into the rendering pot rather than cook it up.
     
  4. inc

    inc Well-Known Member

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    "dont cross them. Unless you have a market for lard."

    thanks for the tip.
    if i ever end up somewhere and have the extra scraps to feed them with, i wuold like to try potbellies.
    my exp with pig is nil except once when i handled a pot belly (probably crossed) when they were hot in thepet trade. oh that thing could scream when you tried to lift it up.
    i think the appeal is to have a commercial type hog with the meat in a smaller size- i can see the interest in mini-hogs might be out ther for some of the common breeds.guess thats why so many people suggest it.
    on your improved pigs with the lard factor bred out- would they still cross out to be lardy types? or havent you tried it?
    the potbellies i see aroung here are definetly the very fat type.
     
  5. GeorgeK

    GeorgeK Well-Known Member

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    It is simply a matter of genetics. If crossed with a lard-type pig, some or all of the offspring will get the lard gene or genes. If it is recessive, then it will be hidden until the second generation. If it is dominant then half to all of them will exhibit it. If you just want a non-lardy pig you could take any group of pigs and just cull the lardy ones and after about 3 generations you will get to your own farm meat pig, if you want something bigger than potbellies.
     
  6. inc

    inc Well-Known Member

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    has anyone crossed one of your improved leaner potbellies out to a commercial hog? or dont you sell stock out?
     
  7. TabletopHomestead

    TabletopHomestead Well-Known Member

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  8. astrocow

    astrocow Well-Known Member

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    One of your questions was in regards to other uses for pig fat other than for cooking. I saved the fat from our pigs and what I didn't save for cooking got used to make soap.
    Leigh
     
  9. GeorgeK

    GeorgeK Well-Known Member

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    Yes, I sell an occassional pig, but I don't know of anyone crossing mine with commercial hogs, most of which are lard type.