Polypays or Suffolk

Discussion in 'Sheep' started by swollen tongue, Mar 30, 2006.

  1. swollen tongue

    swollen tongue Well-Known Member

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    I was just curious as to the opinions of folks on which breeds, polypay or suffolk, would be the all around best for a farm flock for meat lamb production. would you gain anything if you crossed a polypay with a suffolk?? has anybody done this??
     
  2. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    I've had both they're both a heavy lamb breed, the Suffolk might have a bit better reputation for hardiness. My Polypays always grew consistantly which meant I always had fleshy lambs. The Suffolks grew frame first and hung meat off that frame second. Suffolks feet are easy to keep, Polypay need frequent trimming. I got more singles from Suffolks and more triplets from Polypay. I can't think of anythign signifigant you'd get from a cross breed, but it would still be a good lamb. of the two I like the Polypay better, simply because at the end of the year I made more money from the extra lambs, and earlier marketing.
     

  3. swollen tongue

    swollen tongue Well-Known Member

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    they tell me that the wool off a polypay is a better quality and brings higher prices than the suffolk-is this true? Also when you say "hardiness" as far as the suffolk, do you mean winter hardy or just all around physically more hardy? I live in a cold climate in the winter, 15-20 below for about three months at night time, day time about 15 above in the day time, altitude 8100 feet. we do have nice cool summers, 70-85 degrees. I think the suffolk would be the best? All I can raise is one crop of lambs per year here. Also suffolks are larger in size(?) so they might deter predators(coyotes) better? thanks for your input.
     
  4. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Suffolks are smarter sheep, but I lost some to coyotes too. My polypays were quite big and meatier, the Suffolks were slightly more nimble having longer legs. Hardy in every sense so they tolerate cold slightly better (not sure it's a big diff) stay healthier, have better feet, but you will get lower production. Raw wool prices are terrible for all sheep but the Polypay does have a better fleece. These are all very minor differences, I'd still pick (and did for that matter) the Polypay, as they excel in the areas I need. Great feed conversion good lambing percentages, they grow in a consistant manner........... but if you like Suffolks you're picking an excellent type too. With your thinner air I wonder if they might not be a better choice, mine (the suffolks) only rarely had pnuemonia, while the rest (and I've had quite a few breeds) were more prone to it. That might be the one minor advantage for Suffolks. Understand I'm only talking about niggling little differences no clear strikes against either! The Suffolks were healthier the Polypays more productive, but only slightly in both cases.
     
  5. KSALguy

    KSALguy Lost in the Wiregrass Supporter

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    suffulk was mainly used as a herd sire, crossed on to the other common white face ewes back home in Kansas, i have not experiance with the Polypay variety,
    crossing a large Suffulk ram over the other ewes gave farmers more bigger lambs for meat, as the ram gave size and the ewe gave quantity,

    if the Polypay though has good wool, multible births, faster growing meat, then what i would do is get all polypay ewes and a sufulk ram and a polypay ram to compair the differince in the cross and the pure polypay.
    i wouldnt get straight Suffulk though