Pole Barn Home vs Metal Barndominium

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by kroll, May 22, 2020.

  1. kroll

    kroll Member

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    Guys my first post was about just metal Barndominium,but during my research I find Pole Barn homes. What is the advantage of one over the other,I am guessing one is cheaper vs the other? We do get high winds which could reach over 100mph and the metal bldgs that I have look at is rated for 140mph. Since the Pole barns have wood structure are they stronger or weaker? What I am trying is to get my cost down so that I can afford to move and retire,but the cost of concrete is high around here which leaves me with less money. Any thoughts or guidance would be big help,and any Youtubes or websites that would help with my research. Thanks HS Today
     
  2. ET1 SS

    ET1 SS zone 5 - riverfrontage Supporter

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    I have a metal Barndominium. It was originally marketed as an airplane hanger by American Steel. 40' by 60' with 12' eaves and 14' peak. I paid $16,000.

    The engineer signed certificate warrantees its structural against hurricanes, tornadoes and snow load.

    I like pole barns, but you are not going to get an engineer to sign off on the design strength of one.
     
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  3. Fishindude

    Fishindude Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Wood or steel, does not matter. They should be built to code for your area and should be designed to handle the wind loads required by your area, per code.

    A pole building is typically cheaper around here, as they do not require nearly as complicated of a foundation system. The metal roof and wall panels and trims are also typically lighter gauge, as they don't span as far between framing members. For something you are going to live in, I would go with wood framed. It's simply easier to build out the finishes as you have wood framing which is much easier to fasten things to than steel.

    Cold and heat also does not transfer as readily from outside to inside of building through the wood framing, as it does with steel framing. Another plus is that you can do your flat interior ceiling on the underside of the wood trusses quite easily, and super insulate the top side with blown in insulation quite easily and economically.

    I like pole barns, but you are not going to get an engineer to sign off on the design strength of one.
    This is simply not true. Unless you are doing it yourself, piece mealing it together, or having some fly by night AG builder that doesn't do permits build it, post frame / wood frame buildings are typically designed and engineered to meet whatever loads you need.
     
  4. painterswife

    painterswife Sock puppet reinstated Supporter

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    How big of a building are you going to build?
     
  5. CKelly78z

    CKelly78z Well-Known Member

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    Have you considered a 40x60 pole barn with 10' on one end insulated, so a used 36' camper could be parked inside. If you made the barn walls high enough, you could have a walkable loft above the camper for secure storage.
     
  6. Robotron

    Robotron Well-Known Member

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    My pole barn plans were stamped by the engineer licensed in my state.
     
  7. whiterock

    whiterock Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Check the costs, permit requirements, go with what you personally like the best. This is your, hopefully, final home we are talking about. You are the one that has to be happy with it.
    There is a horse barn about 5 miles from me. It was built about 40 years ago by the then owners. It is a basic pole building with post in the ground, and I do mean in the ground. The soil has a huge expansion factor. The owners lived in a double wide mobile home. I went in the barn a couple of years after it was built. The poles are HUGE. I have never seen such poles in a barn before. I'm saying about 2' in diameter. They have to be 8 to 10 ft in the ground to keep from falling over from their own weight. I don't see that coming down in less than a direct hit by a strong tornado or one heck of a fire. The owners father worked for a power company and had contacts to get poles that big and the equipment needed to set them.
     
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  8. RobertDane

    RobertDane Well-Known Member

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    Don't they have, like a metal roof? Wouldn't a hard rain, let alone a hailstorm..be kinda nosy inside?..:rolleyes:
     
  9. kroll

    kroll Member

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    Size, I am thinking 30'x70'x12' little more but no less. Wanting about 1000sq ft for living space and rest as shop space,which be for woodworking projects. The realtor has told me there are no permits or inspections required only if I do something to the septic system. There are utilitys here which there is also an old trailer house with additions that I have to remove or have someone do the demo work. I been watching so many Youtubes about how to do a pole barn that it has me fired up telling myself that I can do this one more time. But I'm 3 1/2 hrs away,and being a one man show it would be tough. Some of the Youtubes show guys using 6x6 than another took 3 2x6 nail them together for Post. Guessing they are using marine grade timbers? Is that necessary?
    I have a quote of 14k for a guy to build forms and do all concrete work and little dirt work.That is a lot of money, for 6" thickness around the perimeter then 4" for the rest.
     
  10. kroll

    kroll Member

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    Your right Robert,one of the Youtube projects use close cell spray foam.But I hear that is very,very expensive,than I also notice that some use insulation with vinyl backing. Hail damage is strong possibility,so going to check into cost for insurance. Besides if it happens then it look like Rustoleum Hammer Paint:)
     
  11. ET1 SS

    ET1 SS zone 5 - riverfrontage Supporter

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    Spray-on urethane foam is easy to apply, and it completely deadens noise.