Poke Greens

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by nubiannana, Apr 19, 2006.

  1. nubiannana

    nubiannana Willow Pond Farm

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    I was wondering if anyone has ever planted a patch of Poke Greens from seed and if so, did you use the seeds from a plant later in the season that has gone to seed. Do you dry the seeds, then plant or what? We love the stuff but would like to have it more accessible than it is now. :help:
     
  2. tyusclan

    tyusclan Well-Known Member

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    I can't help ya. Around here poke WEED is a major aggravation that we make every effort to get rid of.
     

  3. Southern Steve

    Southern Steve Member

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    I just let a bush get full of those berries....and when they turn good and ripe I pick em (with gloves on) and mash them and just scatter them where I want them next year. Never fails to come up.
     
  4. chas

    chas Well-Known Member

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    How do you prepare poke greens.Since we can't seem to get rid of them making them usefull they would probably die out then :rolleyes:
    Chas
     
  5. Corky

    Corky Well-Known Member

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    first you need to understand that poke greens are not poison.
    It is poke white that is poison. I mean the sap in the poke plant.
    I was raised to eat the leaves from a small plant. We boiled them and drained off the water and boiled them again, until the water was fairly clear. Then we prepared them like wilted lettuce. I love them this way but I no longer boil them to mush like my Grandmother did. The very tender young leaves have very little sap in them. now....
    My DH was raised in the east. His family thought the leaves were the poison part.
    They picked plants that were a couple of feet tall and cut off the leaves and tossed them.
    They cut the tender stems in small pieces that looked like okra.
    They then boiled them. Drained them. Boiled them again. Repeat, repeat.
    Then they put in milk and butter and served them like an okra soup.
    No one got sick in either family. Now why was that?
    Because both ways of preparing it removed all the sap from the plants. :)
     
  6. poppy

    poppy Guest

    I parboil them and scramble them with eggs.
     
  7. nubiannana

    nubiannana Willow Pond Farm

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    I've eaten them since I was a kid.
    I boil it, stem and all until it's turned a darker green. Drain that water off, and add fresh water. Bring to a boil again and cook good. Drain that water off, rinse with cold water, put them in freezer bags and freeze.
    When preparing them for a meal, I simply add salt, olive oil and cook a little bit and serve. They are better with bacon grease but we have to watch our cholesterol. We love these with hot, buttered cornbread! mmmm good! Healthy butter of course. teehee
    I also take the larger stalks, when they get big, peel the red stuff off of them, boil them until tender, but not mush, and then fry them like okra! They are wonderful and addictive!
    Thank you for the reply on planting this wonderful stuff! I will do exactly that.
     
  8. blufford

    blufford Well-Known Member Supporter

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