Poison Ivy Hell

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by lilyrose, Sep 15, 2005.

  1. lilyrose

    lilyrose Well-Known Member

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    Okay. I've got poison ivy vines the size of a man's arm growing up my trees. I chopped the vines and put poison on, but the next spring I see more smaller vines climbing up the trees like nobody's business. Growing fast too like 5 feet in one season. I'm inundated with poison ivy and not sure how I'm going to rid my property of the stuff because there is so much. It grows up any tree with rough bark. It's everywhere. Is it possible to get rid of this curse over time or is it a major everliving headache to deal with every year? :grump: I'm very allergic to it so it's a big deal to me. Every time I try to deal with it I break out and have to take prednisone and get shots. Surely there is some substance that can knock it out for good. :mad: I feel like the only way I can tackle it is to herbicide every inch of ground where the stuff is found, but doing that really goes against my principles of good stewardship. I can't get goats yet.
     
  2. Alice In TX/MO

    Alice In TX/MO More dharma, less drama. Supporter

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    Similar problem here in my part of the Ozarks. I use Round Up Brush Control
     

  3. crystalniche

    crystalniche Well-Known Member

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    I know only too well what that is like! We had poison ivy covered trees all along our stone walls and in the front yard. What we did was to simply take a machete and cut thru the main stem of the vine and leave the rest of it right there to die off. Just hack out a piece of stem so the vine dies. After it dries up it will simply go away on its own naturally. You never have to touch it at all. Our neighbors spent a lot of time and money trying to rid themselves of this stuff. My husband simply went out there and in an afternoon had it all hacked thru and after a couple of years it is now under control. Most of it is gone and we have no more problems with it other than going out there if we see anymore and hacking thru its stem too. No chemicals used and the machete can be sharpened and used for other things around the place. Worked for us!
     
  4. Jerr4

    Jerr4 Poems Pears and Promises

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    Cut the bigger vines and put full strength round-up on the cut area with a paint brush. What happens is when you cut the bigger vine it still has a huge root system to feed the little vines(the reason for the rapid growth). Brush the round-up on a couple of times. Put it on the cut so that the roots take the round-up in.
     
  5. Gary in ohio

    Gary in ohio Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Find yourself a neighbor with a llama, Let them at the posion Ivy. They love it.
     
  6. WanderingOak

    WanderingOak Well-Known Member

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    Wouldn't the llama's be a carrier, after they have had their poison ivy salad? I've heard that is why you shouldn't let goats eat poison ivy as well.
     
  7. Gary in ohio

    Gary in ohio Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You mean carrier as in re-seeding? No, llama digest VERY well and seeds dont make it throgh.
     
  8. WanderingOak

    WanderingOak Well-Known Member

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    I was reffering to the oils from the poison ivy being tranfered to the llama and everything that the llama comes into contact with. If you feed the llama by hand, or brush against it's face, wouldn't any poison ivy oils be transfered from the plant to the llama and then from the llama to the handler?
     
  9. bonsai jim

    bonsai jim Well-Known Member

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    Around here they say that Round UP encourages it's growth. I'm not sure if that's true as I just moved to the country and have not yet taken on that battle- although I've already gotten as well as two out of my three boys.

    There's a few products on the market that kill poison ivy specifically--one's called something like "Ivy Stop", another good one is "Brush B Gone".

    Jim Stone
    TX
     
  10. brosil

    brosil Well-Known Member Supporter

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    First, don't kiss the llama.
    Second, we used to spray fuel oil on the poison ivy. It killed the ivy well but didn't seem to kill anything else. That's probably not ecologically correct so don't get noticed doing it.
     
  11. doc623

    doc623 Well-Known Member

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    First if the vine is heavy and harry it bay be poison oak - moot point.
    Cut the vine on the tree then cut out a section of the stalk climbing the tree and use Roundup. Careful not to damage the tree.
     
  12. Bootlegger0173

    Bootlegger0173 Active Member

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    Absolutely, that Roundup is the way to go. Might take a coupla applications to kill it for good though. Just make sure not to burn any of the dead(or still green for that matter) poison afterwards. The oil remains active and can travel airborne and coat anything it touches, and therefore contaminate you for a year or more just by touching that. Also, if you breath in the oil, it can cause lung damage that can kill you. Even for folks you are not normally allergic to it on normal skin contact. Also, whether its Ivy, or Oak, the oil is the same, and I think that goes for Sumac as well, but not sure.

    Bootlegger.
     
  13. JackieA

    JackieA Well-Known Member

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    This site has how-to on the poison ivy (note: I just looked this up since I too am allergic and don't use chemicals - I have always let it grow back and wear long sleeves and also mow over it - so got to try it myself):

    www.care2.com/channels/solutions/outdoors/188

    Basically, I put in google search for: +poison ivy+eco
    and several listings came up.
    JackieA
     
  14. dalilies

    dalilies Well-Known Member

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    I'm doing battle with it in a flower bed and just wanted to wish you well and back up what Bootlegger said. Do Not Burn It.

    I never had a problem with it until I was 11 and someone burned some near our home. A friend and I must of inhaled some of the oils. Our faces and necks swelled like basketballs. Mom had to keep a close eye on me to make sure my throat didn't swell shut. I ended up getting a shot and taking meds for a couple weeks. It was miserable.

    Jennifer
     
  15. RandB

    RandB Well-Known Member

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    Our sheep ate all the poison ivy off a fenceline at our place. They never showed any ill effects, and we never got it from them...
     
  16. Bootlegger0173

    Bootlegger0173 Active Member

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    Goats can eat it too. Odd, huh?
     
  17. james dilley

    james dilley Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I guess I am lucky It doesn't bother me.Poison oak and sumac is the same no effect on me..
     
  18. Charleen

    Charleen www.HarperHillFarm.com Supporter

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    Well, if you get poison ivy on you, be sure to get some Zanfel. It's in the first aid section at the drug store. It's really expensive ($40) but it's instant relief. Follow the directions, do exactly as it tells you. One tube lasts almost forever.
     
  19. LOCKHA885

    LOCKHA885 Active Member

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    I too had such an experience with Poison Ivy, only thing, I was almost 30 yrs. so I can't even use the Youth excuse, and I have always known I am allergic to it. My DH decided to remove a Hedge row from between our neighbors house and ours, and being a big dummy, I decided he needed my help. I helped and after we finished we piled it up in the back yard to burn, but before we were done, I had started breaking out so we decide to quit and take a bath.
    The next couple of days were a misery, but DH decided it was time to burn all the hedges, and me being the big dummy, I decided to help, (wouldn't you think I would have learned by now?) anyway, after we started to burn it, I liked the feel of the warmth on my already blistering arms and legs, and stood right in the smoke and held my arms out so I could relieve the itch.
    The next few days are a blur, I do remember going to the Hospital, and my husband having to help me onto a Gurney, and seeing a Dr. and getting a shot of Adrenline, and going home, well, I almost remember going home. My younger sister had to come up and help care for me for a couple of days.
    I am now a smarter person about such matters, and when someone is cutting grass where it is, I do so hard try to stay inside, until it is done and finished. But when I feel the need to be extra helpful, I spray down in 90% Rubbing Alcohol and that really does the trick, of course I do respray often and as soon as I am finished and then go and Shower off. It is the best remedy for not catching Poison Ivy I have used that actually works.
    I have been told that Copper Sulfate, the kind that Cattle Farmers use on their cows will kill it and I will update that as soon as my frien gives me his bucket he had purchased to help relieve a Horse of a Sarcoid on her leg.
    It didn't help with the Sarcoid, but it may help get rid of PI, and PO.
     
  20. foxtrapper

    foxtrapper Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Ain't it fun? My place had a ton of that heavy growth poison ivy on it when I moved here.

    Cutting the vines off the trees does wonders. But they grow back of course. And there's a tremendous root system in the soil.

    I use Crossbow. Works *real* well in my experience. Far better than RoundUp. Costs less too, and has no grazing restrictions. Apply it directly to the stumps I get from cutting the vines off the trees, and spray it over the fields and area around the trees. There's a lot of it growing in the grass, especially after you've cut down a large vine. The roots are shallow and pop it up all over the place.

    If you've hankered for goats, it's a good excuse. They tend to like it, eschewing the grasses.