Poisionous Plants

Discussion in 'Sheep' started by dosburritosranc, Mar 1, 2005.

  1. dosburritosranc

    dosburritosranc Member

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    WOW!!!
    I just read the sticky on this and how in the world can these animals graze when there are so many plants that can be toxic to them.

    We have acorns everywhere, would they know to spit them out? I know one of our cows made this mistake...she didn't make it.

    Now I am really concerned about raising the Babydolls, there is a ton of stuff growing in the pens.
     
  2. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    You'd really have to check what you have present to how toxic it is and how likely they are to eat it. I don't know if a sheep would eat an acorn or not. A lot of the "toxic" plants aren't deadly just upsetting. If I remember right some sheep eat milk weed with no effect while others like mine simply ignore it. Worth checking into but I wouldn't get too discouraged!
     

  3. bergere

    bergere Just living Life

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    If you are not sure about the plant, the best bet is to remove it.
    That is what I did when I was raising sheep. Don't assume they will not eat it.
    Been there done that,, and rather not loose any animals.
    Last year I had a friend in NV lose half her flock to poisonous plants when they had gotten out of their pasture..all were ewes in lamb..so it was a hard blow.

    Some strains of Milk weed are not toxic, but many are. So you could go to your local nursery and find out which you have.
     
  4. quailkeeper

    quailkeeper Well-Known Member

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    My barbados and katahdins crunch away on the acorns and oak leaves. Never had a problem. My pastures have oak trees all over, there is no way I can or would cut them all down. I even caught them eating hickory nuts one time.
     
  5. birdie_poo

    birdie_poo Well-Known Member

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    Our goat was eating the jade bush like it was candy. Nothing happened to her, but as soon as our sheep ate some of it, she died, blew up like a balloon and had white foam pouring out of her mouth and nose when we found her a couple hours after she ate it. :(
     
  6. Jen H

    Jen H Well-Known Member

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    A lot of those plants are also only toxic at certain times or in certain concentrations.

    And example would be cherry leaves. Fine when they're fresh or completely dried. The problem is when they're wilted.
     
  7. dosburritosranc

    dosburritosranc Member

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    Ross,
    You are right about checking everything out. I will need to get out my gardening book and take a walk. Thank You.

    Bergere, I agree that removing is the best, That would be quite a job as the pen area is a good 80 x 80 feet. I guess I could till it up and plant grass. Thank You.

    Quailkeeper, I hear ya, this place is covered in beautiful woods of oak, pine and cedar, and we get 400 bales in coastal where there are no woods. I won't remove them either. Thanks for your input.

    birdie_poo, that had to be hard. It is never easy losing an animal, even if it was a mother nature call. We buried a calf yesterday that just had to hard of a time. I know what your saying. Thanks for your response.

    Jen H, Thanks for your response, it is hard to know what plant will do what, even to people.

    Thanks for all the responses. I may need to put this new adventure on hold.

    The cows, mini donks, chickens, horses and dogs keep me pretty busy as it is.
     
  8. bergere

    bergere Just living Life

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    I understand what you are going through.. At the old farm we had 2 acre's packed with adult scotch broom, Tansy, foxglove and others to remove. A lot of work, but we removed it all by hand. And every week we would walk it to pull any new ones out.
    If you have children or know of neighbors kids, what want to earn a little money, might be the way to go.

    Now I have a 14 acre Farm with lots of Queen Annes lace, Thistle, burdock (really yucky plant!!),, and others... will be years before we get a handle on it. :p
    So between hand pulling, using White Vinegar spray, and those propane weed burners... lets just say we will stay busy.

    Good luck with your weeds!!