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My husband and I are soon closing on a bit of land. 5 acres with a cute little house, a pole shed and a giant Quonset. We move in September and would like to put fencing up in hopes that we can acquire some animals next spring. Eventually we hope to have a couple of horses, maybe 4 sheep or goats and some chickens. Or possibly 2 mini cows instead of horses. We want a large garden, some apple trees, grape vines, and beehives. Can you please help me with the fencing and layout? We are very new to this and neither one of us has ever lived in the country. I've read a bit to know we need to section off the pasture to allow for controlled grazing. I would really appreciate any and all advice.

The land is a bit hilly but not steep. We hope to fix up the tool shed and keep the animals there. I'm including a picture of the property I found on google. It was an old picture with buildings that have since been torn down so I colored green over them. The whole plot is grassy now.

Thank you so much
 

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So... Which building is the tool shed? Kinda threw a curve when you labeled everything, but then named a different building as the future barn.......

Typical to make a small study fenced small area by the barn, as the yard you can lock critters up in in bad weather, or when the pasture fence goes down, or to treat or confine the critter(s).

Then a gate to the pasture, fence around as much good grass as you can.

Paul
 

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So... Which building is the tool shed? Kinda threw a curve when you labeled everything, but then named a different building as the future barn.......

Typical to make a small study fenced small area by the barn, as the yard you can lock critters up in in bad weather, or when the pasture fence goes down, or to treat or confine the critter(s).

Then a gate to the pasture, fence around as much good grass as you can.

Paul
Meant pole shed not tool shed. Oops
 

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Assuming your house is on the north edge of the property I would run fence along the south side of the quonset with a double gate where the drive looks to cut south. Then go east to what looks to be a garden. If your wanting to keep the garden stay on the west side and head south to the north west corner of the pole shed. Whether you want to tie the fence directly into your shed our not is up to you, but it looks like a good place to make a small corral. Depending on the door layout on the shed I would probably start the fence again on the south east corner of the shed near the road and just follow the boundary (looks like your black line is pretty close) back around to the quonset.

After you get up good perimeter fence you can divide up lanes however you see fit, but you will have a heck of a time trying to make the perimeter fence larger.

Not sure how much land is on the north east side of the house, but that's probably where I'd plant some fruit trees.

Red brands website has a fence building calculator which I thought was pretty user friendly. Even if you don't use their fence it would still give you measurements and how much fence needed.

Good luck!

P.S. I just put up 660 feet of the red brand sheep and goat fence and I love it!
 

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If you haven't already done so, get a survey done, with irons at the corners, and in the places where the property takes off on a new course or curve. That way, there will be no question of what you and/or your neighbor owns.

geo
 

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I also believe in perimeter fencing. T-posts and woven wire are not too expensive for 5 acres and can save a lot of grief.
Before you decide where you are putting your pasture and barn, you might want to consider where you want to run your water lines. And if you have a well, you need to keep pastures a certain distance away from it.
Wind direction is also a factor.
 
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Different animals need different fencing. Goats are good with 5 foot tall fence with 2" x 4" openings with 4*4 posts.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Assuming your house is on the north edge of the property I would run fence along the south side of the quonset with a double gate where the drive looks to cut south. Then go east to what looks to be a garden. If your wanting to keep the garden stay on the west side and head south to the north west corner of the pole shed. Whether you want to tie the fence directly into your shed our not is up to you, but it looks like a good place to make a small corral. Depending on the door layout on the shed I would probably start the fence again on the south east corner of the shed near the road and just follow the boundary (looks like your black line is pretty close) back around to the quonset.

After you get up good perimeter fence you can divide up lanes however you see fit, but you will have a heck of a time trying to make the perimeter fence larger.

Not sure how much land is on the north east side of the house, but that's probably where I'd plant some fruit trees.

Red brands website has a fence building calculator which I thought was pretty user friendly. Even if you don't use their fence it would still give you measurements and how much fence needed.

Good luck!

P.S. I just put up 660 feet of the red brand sheep and goat fence and I love it!
This is wonderful I love it. I drew it out on a piece of paper and it looks great. For a couple of horses and some goats how would you suggest we divide the pasture on the inside?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
If you haven't already done so, get a survey done, with irons at the corners, and in the places where the property takes off on a new course or curve. That way, there will be no question of what you and/or your neighbor owns.

geo
This is great advice. Any advice on who I would contact to get a survey done and how much that costs?

Thanks so much
 

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I also believe in perimeter fencing. T-posts and woven wire are not too expensive for 5 acres and can save a lot of grief.
Before you decide where you are putting your pasture and barn, you might want to consider where you want to run your water lines. And if you have a well, you need to keep pastures a certain distance away from it.
Wind direction is also a factor.
The well is directly west from where the driveway turns into the pasture. So a bit to the front and side of the quonset. The septic is north of the house a bit. It should be easy to place the fencing away from these 2 areas. Thanks
 

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Rather than having your land surveyed, see if a surveyor will just stake the corners. Because you have a curved side, maybe 3 or 4 stakes. This is an option rather than giving you all the paperwork. To have a survey done can run $300 +. Staking corners is a lot cheaper, although not all surveyors will do it. - You have to ask.
 

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I don't know where you are and I am not a horse owner, but from observations of my neighbors and comments from others, 5 acres is not enough for 2 horses plus other livestock in my area. I would get local advice. In SC a 2 horse owner on 5 acres would make a very good hay customer.

COWS



















a horse owner
 

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I don't know where you are and I am not a horse owner, but from observations of my neighbors and comments from others, 5 acres is not enough for 2 horses plus other livestock in my area. I would get local advice. In SC a 2 horse owner on 5 acres would make a very good hay customer.

COWS
 
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