Please help- jersey cow and calf questions!!

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by Momof8kiddoes, Apr 21, 2005.

  1. Momof8kiddoes

    Momof8kiddoes Well-Known Member

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    Just got home this evening with our jersey and a calf....
    On the Jersey cow, she is low anyway on production, since she is due to calf in July (maybe giving a gallon of milk is what the guy thought she might be giving)...I went to milk her tonight, and boy-it isnt like milking goats-ack!! Any tips please send my way..I didnt seem to be getting a let down. I used some utter butter, but dont know what else to do. I got maybe a quart from her..but am figuring the trip would lower her milk yeild?

    On the calf....she is a month old. I gave her a bottle of the milk I milked from the cow, but she only drank about 1 1/2 cups tonight. I dont know if that is ok or not (we werent planning on a calf, so I didnt get to research what to do).
    Im worried the trip was too much for her (7hrs), and I dont know if I am doing this right. Please help, how much should she be drinking? Also, it is reallllyyy windy here tonight, so I went out and put her in with my 2 goats, to keep her out of the bitter wind. Was that the right thing to do?
    I hope goats and calves get along.

    This really stinks, cause without you guys, Im outta luck. Nowon here that I know of does dairy cows, and Im not finding the aswers to my ?'s in the book Keeping a Family Cow.
    Please help me if you can!
    Mary F.
     
  2. Valmai

    Valmai Well-Known Member

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    First of all I think your timing is wrong somewhere along the way. Is this her calf or was it fostered on? If its her calf she wont be due in July or the calf is older than one month. If the calf was fostered you will need milk from another source and dry the cow off by May. If you milk her right through to the day she calves, Im not sure the newborn calf will get colostrum (someone else will know for sure).
    I dont think it is odd for her to give only a small amount of milk and the calf to not be hungry after such a journey. Watch out for the calf having mild scours, it will not be a problem if it is related to an upset tummy due to travel. Make sure there is clean water freely available at all times.
    Dont know about cows with goats (Ive never had goats) but they certainly could do with some pampering right now, shelter is always good. :cool:
     

  3. Ronney

    Ronney Well-Known Member

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    Val, in another thread Mary was saying that this cow had another calf on her which wasn't her own - somebody trying to squeeze in that extra calf.

    Mary, don't be concerned. Both animals have just had a 7 hour trip and will be distressed and upset. I would suggest that you put them into a paddock for the next 24 hours and let them settle down. By the way, I assume this calf is feeding from the cow itself? Spend a little bit of time near them talking and perhaps offering some hay of nuts, just so that they get used to you and your voice. Then have another go at milking her. It probably still won't be highly successful because the milking shed, your handling of her, the routine will all be different but by the end of a week she should be starting to come right. Because of the upset, her production may well drop to the point that all she is producing should be going to the calf in which case let the calf have it and look at weaning it at the end of May/early June then drying the cow off before she calves again in July - when you will be able to start with a clean slate.

    It seems very worrying at the moment but in the due course of time it will be all worth while :)

    Cheers,
    Ronnie
     
  4. Paula

    Paula Well-Known Member

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    For the health of the calf I would let it nurse off the cow (it was on the cow at the other farm?) for at least a few days till things settle down. Jersey calves are a little delicate with being moved. If it starts scouring you have a good chance of losing it, and it's not hard to start them scouring. Whatever it's used to is what you should do for a while.
     
  5. Momof8kiddoes

    Momof8kiddoes Well-Known Member

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    Its me again, sorry if I wasnt clear on my post, and thanks for the replies so quickly.
    The calf is not the cows, and was on her own mama till the move. I dont think she knows how to drink from a bottle? I am milking out the cow, adding a little water, and giving it to the calf. I went out about midnight last night, all was well in the goat shed. I fed the calf a little bit more milk, but I had to strattle her, and force her mouth open. Is that the way to do it? I just remember that her neck must be up, so as to not asperate...so I made sure of that.

    The cow gave me about 3/4 gal this morning, though I dont think she was completly milked out. Udder feels ok, warm but not hot, no hard spots. I will go out again tonight and try again. Still not sure if Im milking right, but I did get a letdown this morning, and it was spraying from at least one quarter.

    If this sounds ok, let me know. On the calf, still looking for how much milk she should be consuming? Any tips on how to get her used to that bottle?
    THANK YOU guys for being here for me!!
    Mary F.
     
  6. mamalisa

    mamalisa Well-Known Member

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    Take a deep breath and don't worry.

    It took Daisy and I an entire week to get comfortable with each other. Several times, I was in tears, so don't feel bad. Thankfully, you don't have one of those overproducing dairy cows that will get mastitis if you don't milk her out immediately. Be prepared for her production to drop a wee bit and then pick back up as she gets used to you.

    Establish a routine and don't vary from it for a few weeks. Cows like routine. They thrive on it.

    I don't know how much milk a calf ought to get. I think half a gallon twice a day, but I'm not sure. It will take about 2-3 days for the light to go on, if calves are like goats....take one nipple and put a bit bigger hole in it so it drips. It will go faster if she gets a taste of the milk....and if she is a month old, she isn't quite as fragile as a newborn. Make sure she has water, hay and calf starter available as well.
     
  7. jerzeygurl

    jerzeygurl woolgathering

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    try to use a warm wet rag to masage the udder. same routine every day,