Please explain the difference

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by Ninn, Jan 14, 2007.

  1. Ninn

    Ninn Custom Crochet Queen

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    between determinate and indeterminate tomatoes. I have seeds for both types. Does this affect how they are planted? Or does it refer to their pollination? (Gawd, I feel like an idiot every time I ask a question in here.......lol)
     
  2. Pouncer

    Pouncer Well-Known Member

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    No it simply refers to which way they grow...branching and bushy, or tall tall tall! And extremely TALL if you live where I do, LOL
     

  3. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    By golly, that was a pretty good explanation by that "guest"! I thought that we'd lost all of those old posts. Shows that we were also having fun with seeds back then. That was the year after I rescued Wisconsin 55 from potential obscurity. When my supply ran out, I was able to get some from Jung's and keep the offer going.

    Not much more that I could add to the original explanation other than each determinate lateral usually ends in a flower bud. Other than that, thanking whomever managed to save me the trouble of explaining it again!

    Martin
     
  4. ddede

    ddede Member

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    In other words, you can grow the determinate types in the 3' or 4' high tomato cages that garden centers sell.

    There is NO WAY you can grow the indeterminate ones in cages that short. They have long vines that will grow out the top, flop over the side and keep going on the ground. You need tall supports for the indeterminate types.
     
  5. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    That is true. Most determinates top out at 3' to 4'. Those 3' cages are fine for such varieties. One also doesn't need to try keep stuffing each lateral inside the cage. Allow them to grow sideways as well for maximum production.

    Martin
     
  6. GeorgiaberryM

    GeorgiaberryM Well-Known Member

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    Our determinates will top out our 6 foot cages. Our indeterminates will top out the 6 foot cages, go all the way to the ground again, and if left alone will go all the way back up again. We grow in raised beds loaded with organic matter. I have about a hundred 3 foot cages and I can't even use them for peppers; the peppers get too big. The moral here, determinates can get very big, just not as big. Those 3 foot cages could possibly be used in conjuction with a stake for many of you but I would go ahead and make that post 6 feet because you are going to be tying.

    Husband o'G
     
  7. circlevranch

    circlevranch Well-Known Member

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    The determinate tomatoes will normally set all there fruit at one time and rippen then the plant will die. The indeterminate tomatoes will set there fruit and contnue to do all season long or until something kills the plant like frost. The indeterminate tomatoes seem to take a little longer to rippen but a lot depends on the year and weather conditions.
     
  8. southerngurl

    southerngurl le person Supporter

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    I just remember it by: it's easy to "determine" how big a determinate tomato will grow (small bushy), however, indeterminates, they like to take over the place, but the don't quit until something kills them (be it disease or frost).
     
  9. Ninn

    Ninn Custom Crochet Queen

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    OK, so my determinates go in cages in the beds, all set fruit at once, and die off. Those need rotational planting to get a summer long harvest. These ones are for sauce and salsa canning.

    Indeterminates go in trenches with trellises, ripen all summer long, and are harvest ready later in the season. These ones are better in salads , but can be used for sauce as well. They will die off at the end of the season and be tilled under as green manure?

    Do I have it now?
     
  10. Steve L.

    Steve L. Well-Known Member

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    Yep, you got it, except maybe for the "need rotational planting to get a summer long harvest" part, at least here in central NY. Even though determinates "all set fruit at once", "all at once" is a lot closer to a month than it is to a day. If I plant a 75 day 'sauce' tomato on May 20, I'll be lucky to see any useable fruit by August 10 (75 days would be Aug. 2, but days to harvest tend to be very optimistic). I would expect to still have some fruit on Sept. 1. It depends, too, on how ripe you want your fruit to be at harvest. I'd think your part of PA would be similar.