Please describe your pig's shelter...

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by storybook, Jul 5, 2005.

  1. storybook

    storybook Storybook Farm

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    We are new to pigs and are curious what others have put up for pig shelters. Please describe your pig shelter and tell how many pigs it is for. Does the shelter have to have three sides? Do pigs prefer small homes or big ones? We only have two pigs. What size shelter would be good for them?
     
  2. Allan Mistler

    Allan Mistler Just a simple man

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    Hello, I don't participate much but I read everybodies input and apply the good ideas to my homestead situation. As such, I built a three sided pig shelter this year from four heavy wooden pallets (one for floor as well). On the plywood roof (adequately reinforced) I placed a 55 gallon food-grade plasic barrel filled with fresh water which feeds a pig nipple mounted on one side of the shelter at about 16" off the ground.
    On the other side of the shelter I built a wooden feeder that can hold 300# of pelletized feed and will supply my three pigs for I don't know how long since they've been growing so fast now that the consumption rate is rapidly changing. It was put together with one 4x8 sheet of 3/4 plywood cut to provide a 2' wide front and rear panel as well as two sloped sides that were 2' wide at the top and 1' wide at the bottom. The feed tray itself is a 2' long section of 12" PVC pipe cut in half and the bottom of the feeder chute is pinched down to about only 3/4" to keep the feeder full, but never overflowing. I placed a piece of plywood on the top to keep it all raintite and now my morning chores are sooooo much easier and cleaner for me. Instead of getting muddied up every morning before heading off to work, I only have to visit their shelter every few days to refill the waterer and feeder.
    The containment area is made from six pig panels strung in a circle with electric wire mounted inside at about 10" off the ground, and another along the top of the panels to keep my cows from getting too close (I keep the pigs up in a corner of the pasture). Using those plastic fencing posts and insulators allows you to put wire just about anywhere you'd like, and by connecting it to the edge of the cattle fencing, it stays "hot". Though the shelter is very heavy, it IS movable from season to season with the assistance of the tractor. The fencing of course is very flexible as well as expandable since, once the pigs are electric fence "trained", you can contain them with merely a low wire.
     

  3. Misty

    Misty Misty Gonzales

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    go my website and click on "seedstock". We have a barn about 40 foot long that we use for hogs. We also use "porta huts" that we have found at auctions/used for around $35.00.
    www.geocities.com/gonzalesshowpigs
    pigs 40# 3 sf MINIMUM. We prefer way more than that. We also make sure and provide more than one eating place as they will fight for food and someone will almost always not get enough.
     
  4. MoBarger

    MoBarger Goat's Milk soap for sale

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    upstate NY
    We built one pictured here:
    [​IMG]
    It is made from rough cut and put on skids so we can move it around.

    We also use Porta-huts http://www.port-a-hut.com/
     
  5. storybook

    storybook Storybook Farm

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    Thanks for describing or picturing your pig shelters. They are definitely more elaborate than ours. We live in MO and do not plan to keep any pigs during the winter months. Do you think our pigs still need a shelter with three sides? My husband just put up a metal roof and a sheet of metal on the back side but it isn't to the ground. He was hoping it would be enough but I think they need more sides on it.

    Also, do you put the feed and water IN the shelter so they can get to it? What about the flies getting in there because of the feed? Would it be better to keep the food farther away from their shelter?

    I am going to town today to buy a waterer with the nipple thing that I've read about on this website. I hope I can find the same thing. Where do I get the 55 gallon drum??
     
  6. jspear21

    jspear21 Member

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    NY
    We have two puglets we're raising for our freezer. They are about 6 weeks old. I have a 30' x 30' yard for them adjacent to my vegetable garden (I'm taking advantage of the free tillage so I can expand our garden next year). We use electric fencing: 4 strands of 1/2" tape at 4", 8" 12" and 24". I expect to disconnect the strand at 4" in a few weeks as they grow.

    Now for the shelter: I built a simple 1-sided pole structure with scrap fence posts and 2x6s. It is about 11' wide and 8' deep. It's about 5' high in the front and 3.5' high in the back. It is built into the side of their yard. I was advised that in our climate (Adirondack mountains of NY) pigs raised in the summer/fall most need shelter from shade, and it have a metal roof. I nailed some planks to the south facing side to provide shade and stapled wire mesh to the other two sides to keep them in. I burried boards 12" deep and stapled the mesh to that to keep them from digging under. The fourth side is open to their yard.

    I spread a bale of straw in the shelter and they cover themselves in straw as they sleep (once I thought they escaped only to discover them snoozing under the straw). I'll add a bale of straw probably once per month.

    Becasue feeder pigs are so hard to find these days in our area, we are considering breeding our female. If we do, during the winter I'll probably attach sheets of ridgid foam insulation under the roof, stack straw bales along the currently open walls and use a heat lamp.

    Good luck. I'm just starting myself and I've find this board to be very helpful. I've also met several local farmers (professional and hobby) who have been invaluable.
     
  7. elgordo

    elgordo Well-Known Member

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    oregon
    Are your pigs for consumption or breeding? We raise for meat so we use simple shelters. A cattle panel made into a hoop with either shade cloth or a tarp on top. Or an A-frame made out of plywood. We are in the northwest and don't get really cold for a long period. We also pasture raise so they have alot of shade trees. We also provide a self-feeder, a pig water nipple and a wallow. If you want details I'd be happy to give 'em just e-mail or PM.
     
  8. Charleen

    Charleen www.HarperHillFarm.com Supporter

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    pigpen

    Here's a photo of our pig pen. Sorry that you have to link to it. I just can seem to post a photo on this forum.

    Overall pasture is 24' x 64' using 12 16' panels. We used a total of 24 T-posts for the fencing. There is additional pasture that we can expand to if needed.

    The covered area is made from 3 panels that are hooped and wired together and covered with a tarp. This area is 12' x (approx) 13'. We used 16 T-posts here; 4 per hooped panel and an additional 4 for support.

    Seems like a lot of T-posts and panels but it's all moveable so we can relocate it anywhere on our property or take it with us if we move.

    Electric fencing runs inside the perimeter of the pen. Pigs use the far corner for their toilet. They started using a corner in the front near the gate, but we moved their feeder there and they stopped.

    Pig pen is located adjacent to our pumpkin and corn gardens, so all weeds are thrown to the pigs. We ferment whole oats and wheat in goat milk and feed to the pigs in addition to a purchased pig mash.

    One thing that we learned: We began a muddy wallow just outside of the tarped area and they loved it, but tended to lay there all day and not get out of the sun. So, we created one in a corner under the tarp, so they're happy with that. We occasionally add straw or hay to their tarped area.

    We have also built a turkey shelter using the same tarped design, but used 4 panels instead of 3 and made it 10' wide instead of 12'. Ends of panels are set inside of a wooden frame on the ground and all is covered with chicken wire and 1/2 covered with a tarp.
     
  9. Trisha-MN

    Trisha-MN www.BilriteFarms.com

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    We are using a discarded (free) pickup topper with the front tied open. The sides can be opened for ventilation. We will put it on blocks when they need more height.
     
  10. stellie

    stellie Well-Known Member

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    Virginia
    Well, we bought a place that was originally a pig operation years back -- a 'hog house' was already on the property. The building is actually in the process of falling apart in the area that the hogs would normally be in -- the goats sleep there, now, climbing all over everything. The hogs climb up and down the steps to the 'office' and storage areas of the building with an exteriour run-around fenced-in area for mud and muckery.

    We've five piglets weaned from their sow that run about with the sheep and goats -- they sleep under the old trucks, mostly. They take to the pallet-shed when the mother ewe pen is opened, though.

    The pallet-shed is basically six wood pallets nailed together |__| with two strips of tin sheeting over the top, nailed securely. Posts are at the corners of the structure, the structure is no more than four feet high. Cost to us: Time and attention to build, gasoline to go get the pallets; the tin was from an old construction site and we had the nails on hand. We use what we find from old projects and near-by companies usually throw away pallets instead of reuse them.
     
  11. gccrook

    gccrook Well-Known Member

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    SC Kansas
    That looks almost identical to my pen. Mine is slightly larger, but I have 7 pigs this year. I could not believe how similar that looks to mine. Excellent.
     
  12. Charleen

    Charleen www.HarperHillFarm.com Supporter

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    I guess great minds think alike!