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It is so difficult to tell from a picture. I think he seems to have a good amount of bone. I like that. I can't tell how broad or narrow his front is from this view. He is standing kinda funny in this picture so it is difficult to tell how square he stands. He seems pretty thick from top to bottom. He maybe could use a bit more length. He also looks to have some depth in the chest. I would imagine that would also look deeper if he was standing up straighter and in a more stacked pose. That is about all I can tell without more views of his hind and front ends. I'll tell you this, he looks as though he has the potential to wind up being a really big boy. You can't do anything about the frame. So, depending on what he has in front and back, he can add muscle to that but what you see is what you get on bone frame. Like I said, I just can't tell in this pic. Keep this pic and post it again in a year, along with a 2 yr old pic and we'll see about him then!! That would be interesting!! We've had the same problems with getting a good pictures. We haven't taken the time to stack and photograph any of our goats. I would imagine any goat would look much more impressive that way. The quality of your photo and proper posing makes all the difference. If you have enough time to sit in your pasture and wait for just the right moment, you can sometimes get a decent one. It just takes FOREVER!!!! Just to show you a comparison against another buck of similiar age....here is our fullblood Boer buck (below). This won't show you all sides of him either....just a couple of side views at different angles. He turned 1 yr in April and this photo was taken in July. He had been running with a herd of does since the end of March and had no grain during that time. I have my own ideas about what I do and don't like about my buck also. I won't say though b/c I might want someone to evaluate him too (in a different thread, of course...haha). Hope that helps. Here is Logan:



 

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West Central Minnesota
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I have rasied Reg Full blood Boers for a long time.Your buck has a deep broad wide frame. Good bone and a strong topline with a tight smooth shoulder. He has good size for his age and should continue to mature well. He is the 'right kind'
I would use him extensively and keep back his very best daughters.
Check out my stock on my web site. See my two bucks.......your buck looks good.

Jerry
http://www.fletcherthreeoaks.com
 

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Pook's Hollow
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This is useful information :) I don't know much about Boer conformation either - but I'm going to be learning! I'm going to a Boer show in a couple of weeks, and planning to breed my Nubian to a Boer buck this fall.

They both look quite handsome and solid to me. That said, I notice that their toplines aren't level. Is that just the way they're standing, or is that not the concern that it is with dairy goats? Inquiring minds want to know! :p
 

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He has a bit of swayback there, you will want to breed him with straighter does to eliminate that. You want that topline to be level in progeny, and you want as little angle in back as possible. Angle there can make does that are hard kidders. Cull all progeny lacking these qualities to improve your herd.

He's early maturing, which is good in meat goats cuz it saves you money feeding your kid crop. Looks like the scrotal circumference could be bigger, and there is emerging evidence that scrotal size links with larger milk bags and higher production in Boers, so breed to larger-bagged does for any replacement bucks. Nice, even sac though, and not split.

His best features are from the front shoulders up, so look to breed him with does that are fleshy from the shoulders back and also straight as possible along the topline. Be aware of the larger head for the body size and the larger front proportions, and make sure he is bred to wide females that are springy in the ribs, and not those that are narrow in back, or you could be looking at assisted kidding, which is not desireable in Boers.

A good solid herd buck overall, and especially so with the right kind of females. He can help you grow your herd to another level with the right breeding. Then you put a finishing buck on those progeny and get a big jump.

He would dress out moderately as far as meat yield. That is something you can improve in your herd by stepped breeding of progeny that meet your goals for meatiness and conformation.
 

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why hide it?
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To me, the first buck looks less sway back than the second buck posted. The second one looks a bit longer. I like a straighter back myself too. It's hard to tell in a young animal, sometimes the hindquarters grow faster than forequarters (in some species), giving an odd look til maturity...but what do I know, I don't know much about Boer competitions at all. Dairy gal here and we raise Boers for the table.
 

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Well, I'll go ahead and say it, I'm not too happy with the way our buck looks. I see a few flaws I'd like to change. Well, we lost our buck last year and bought this guy as a 7 month old. He comes from good bloodlines so we are hoping to see something good from his kids. Many times, it isn't what the goats look like but what the genetic cross produces. Regardless, he is too narrow in front. He has a good loin and nice length. I also like his head and horn set (not that it matter for the freezer). I like the fact that he stands tall enough. I don't like that he isn't large boned...I prefer the heavier boned bucks. That is where I thought cayenne47's buck looked good. As far as the topline on my buck, hmmmm...I think he was standing on uneven ground. I haven't noticed him being that swayed before. We have really hilly, bumpy ground. Now I'll be going out and checking him out again!! What an interesting thread. I like to hear other people's opinions.

Feral Nature - The judges like a fairly smooth topline on the Boers too. I still hold to the thought that stacking them properly makes a huge difference. I've never seen a picture of a winning goat that they didn't have them stretched way out. It is easy to get the rump down lower that way. I tend to think that Boer goats tend to be slightly more raised in the rump than dairy goats, in general.
 
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