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My 5 roots arrived today. Anyone have any tips or tricks? I was going to plant it in one of my raised beds but it sounds like horseradish can be pretty aggressive.

Thanks in advance.

Mike
 

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Find a permanent home for the horseradish. Avoid mixing soil from the horseradish area with other garden spots since even micro-roots will sprout wherever you mix soil. Its not terrible though, you just have to be persistent. I grow it in one corner of one box. I find it coming up around this box and just keep digging it up. Otherwise it would take over.
 

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A piece of root about 20cm long, and the downward end cut on a slant, can be pushed into the ground on a slight angle, so that the top of the cutting will be 5cm below the soil. Soil should be worked down at least 60cm. Prefers full sun and deep, moist, rich, well-drained soil pH 6.8, but will grow almost anywhere.

And yes, it can quickly take over. I had mine in a pot, and ended up with new plants coming out of the drainage holes, and taking hold in the tiny cracks between concrete pavers on which the pot stood. Prior to that I had it in the garden, and I had no end of problems getting rid of it! I'd suggest a very large, very deep pot for it, or else you're asking for trouble!
 

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Yes make a permanent place for it after a great deal of thought because once you plant it there is nothing more persistent than Horseradish. In my garden the previous gardener had had a large patch of Horseradish they wanted to get rid of apparently. So they tried to dig it out. So when I moved here I had a 4 foot by 8 foot by 18 inch deep pit with Horseradish growing on the bottom and sides rampantly. I tried reburying it and now I have a LEVEL area of Horseradish appoximately 6 by 11 feet! But the fill dirt I used was nice and sandy so at least I get nice clean roots on the few occasions a year when I need a piece of horseradish :) . I've decided to completely ignore it in the hopes that it won't expand any further.
 

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Yuo sound like me... I have 5 roots coming in next week and found out that for our family (6) we only really need 1 root to supply our needs. So I'll have to find homes for the other 4.
 

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LWMSAVON said:
Yuo sound like me... I have 5 roots coming in next week and found out that for our family (6) we only really need 1 root to supply our needs. So I'll have to find homes for the other 4.
If you haven't found homes for them yet, I'm interested. I love horseradish. I even eat it on scrambled eggs with cayenne pepper for breakfast. :worship: I pm'd you.
 

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What a coincidence this topic came up, I just about killed myself on the stuff yesterday. I was home from college and we were having ham for dinner. I spread a load of my father’s homemade stuff on my ham not thinking that this stuff, akin to nuclear fuel, was not what we get at the college. I put the first bight into my mouth and keep carrying on my conversation. I get about five chews into it when it HIT me. It was either I spit it out or pass out. So I spit out the chewed up ham/radish on my plate followed by an awful cough. Yeah…I just gave my father conversation material for the next month.


“Har har har…I was wondering what the hell you were doing!!!” :haha:
 

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Fla Gal said:
If you haven't found homes for them yet, I'm interested. I love horseradish. I even eat it on scrambled eggs with cayenne pepper for breakfast. :worship: I pm'd you.

I got your pm and replied. :)






Just FYI for all others: my 4 extra roots have been spoken for :)
 

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Ours is planted in a concrete box set in the ground. In addition, every year we dig up all of the roots, use them, or give them away, and replant the tops (with a little root attached). They just keep coming back. The foliage is impressive, so I really don't mind it as a backdrop in the garden. We are ruthless to it, and it just keeps coming back for more!
 

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MelissaW said:
every year we dig up all of the roots, use them, or give them away, and replant the tops (with a little root attached). They just keep coming back. The foliage is impressive, so I really don't mind it as a backdrop in the garden. We are ruthless to it, and it just keeps coming back for more!
Melissa,

It makes me want to get ruthless and 'rude' with the little bit of horseradish I have. I planted them last spring and will start harvesting them this year. Oh... yummy... Grated horseradish, with the young tender horseradish greens on almost every food imaginable, even yellow squash and zucchini. I believe I'll pass on adding it to sweet potatoes though :D

LWMSAVON,

Thanks for the pm and with Melissa's post it sounds like I might not need any additional roots. :cool:
 

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gobug said:
FlaGal, You eat horseradish greens???
Please elaborate.

Sure... onion greens, poke salad, radish greens, turnip greens, beet greens, etc., why not horseradish greens. Pick then when the greens are about ½-grown and they'll keep growing back and back and back. You can blanch and freeze them just like spinich, kale and the others, aforementioned.
 

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Can horseradish grow in poor soil and does it need full sun. I received my 5 roots and I'm sure glad I read this thread. Now I want to put it away from the garden! What about putting it out along the edge of the goat field?
 

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You didn't say where you are, so here is something, at least. Plenty of moisture, any good ground and preferably full sun.

Horseradish is adapted to the north-temperate regions of the United States, but not to the South, except possibly in the high altitudes.

Any good soil, except possibly the lightest sands and heaviest clays, will grow horseradish, but it does best on a deep, rich, moist loam that is well supplied with organic matter. Avoid shallow soil; it produces rough, prongy roots. Mix organic matter with the soil a few months before the plants or cuttings are set. Some fertilizer may be used at the time of planting and more during the subsequent seasons. A top dressing of organic matter each spring is advisable.

Horseradish is propagated either by crowns or by root cuttings. In propagating by crowns a portion of an old plant consisting of a piece of root and crown buds is merely lifted and planted in a new place. Root cuttings are pieces of older roots 6 to 8 inches long and of the thickness of a lead pencil. They may be saved when preparing the larger roots for grating, or they may be purchased from seedsmen. A trench 4 or 5 inches deep is opened with a hoe and the root cuttings are placed at an angle with their tops near the surface of the ground. Plants from these cuttings usually make good roots the first year. As a rule, the plants in the home garden are allowed to grow from year to year, and portions of the roots are removed as needed. Pieces of roots and crowns remaining in the soil are usually sufficient to reestablish the plants.

There is very little choice in the matter of varieties of horseradish. Be sure, however, to obtain good healthy planting stock of a strain that is giving good results in the area where it is being grown.

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Horseradish
Horseradish is a plant worth growing, provided you keep its growth in check. Horseradish roots can be planted in spring or fall, roughly 2 to 4 inches deep and 1 to 2 feet apart, preferably in full sun. They also need plenty of moisture

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http://horseradishplants.com/phorum/phorum-3.4/read.php?f=1&i=222&t=222
These ought to get you going. And the goats will probably eat it if you put it there. They'll eat anything you don't want them before they'll eat weeds, etc.

. ;)
 

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gobug said:
FlaGal, You eat horseradish greens???
Please elaborate.
I can stand in my garden and make a full meal out of what I see, horseradish greens included. They aren't as hot as the root but do add a bite to salads. I use the young tender leaves for salads or, standing in the garden eating my salad 'really' fresh. Just pick a bunch of green stuff and wrap it in a swiss chard, mustard or young collard leaf. :D I use the older greens by chopping and steaming or stir frying them for that bit of hot taste.

They add a mildly hot... to me.. ( remember, I like horseradish and cayenne pepper on my eggs for breakfast) taste to any dish. Horseradish is a member of the mustard family and as far as I'm concerned the greens are fair game. Yummy! :D I haven't tried them boiled to take the hot taste away but understand you have to boil the leaves three times and dump the water for them to be tasty to those that don't like the hot spicy taste.

This site doesn't tell you about the greens, just about the roots. There just isn't much out there on the greens
http://www.horseradish.org/facts.html

You could try a small nip of a green and determine how you would want to use them in your cooking, if you would want to cook them at all. ;)
 

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Thank you very much.

I'll just have to try it. They're poking up out of the ground now, and so are bunches of greens. It'll be a few days, or maybe a week, but you got me interested.
 

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gobug,

You're welcome and please let us know what you think of the greens and how many ways you plan on using them. :p

Mike,

I hope you don't mind your thread being somewhat hijacked but all this should be good information for you too. Good luck with your horseradish and bon appetite. ;)
 

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Thanks WV rebel!
I'm zone 5 on a hillside which gives me a 5 and a half sometimes???
I put the horseradish out this afternoon between the asparagus bed and the goat fence. DH doesn't have room to mow there and if it spreads over into the goat field I suppose they'll love it. I just hope it doesn't get out of control. I did plant the cuttings at a slant with the "bigger" end up, but it was kinda' hard to tell which that was.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Mamagoose,

If those are dairy goats you might get some interestingly flavored milk.

Fla Gal, I'm enjoying the thread. I'm still trying to figure out where I want to plant the horseradish.

Mike
 

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FlaGal,
I put some in my salad last night and they were good. Not to spicy at all, at least for my taste buds. Thanks for the tip.
 
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