Planning to buy some goats in near future.

Discussion in 'Goats' started by southrngardngal, Sep 17, 2006.

  1. southrngardngal

    southrngardngal Well-Known Member

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    Philadelphia, Mississippi
    Hubby is the middle of making a fenced in area for some goats. He wants to get three. Two does and a buck is what we are wanting to begin with. We live in East Central Mississippi where we can get down to the teens in the winter time (hardly ever snows) and the summer is hot and humid. Today's high temp that I saw was 91 degrees.

    What we want are some goats to milk. I want the milk to drink, to make cheese, to use in soaps and any other use we can come up with. Any recommendations for the best breed to meet the needs listed and for this climate?

    They will have a shed inside a pen for nighttime. Then will be outside during the day.

    We would like to purchase registered goats also. We have a large 4-H Club orginization in this area and was thinking that we could sell some to the 4-H members if they are registered.

    Thanks for any advice.

    Jan
     
  2. vancom

    vancom Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Middle Tennessee
    While we aren't as far south as Mississippi, we get weather extremes here near Nashville. We have Lamanchas that are in a shed inside a pen at night, and then spend their day roaming a fenced area in the woods on our property. We presently have 3 does and 2 wethers. Soon we will add a buck, and move him and the weathers to a pen/shed/yard area on another part of the property--buck in rut smells. Not horrible but just smelly. We will NOT keep them together as the small effects the taste of the milk. So you may need more sheds/pens/yards than you think!

    We milk ours, sell one or two here and there, and plan to send any new boys born this spring to freezer camp for sausages and meat for shish-k-bobs.

    Lamanchas are good all weather goats--they are quieter than some and give about a medium quantity of milk--my third freshner consistenly milked out at 1/2 gallon per day several months after kidding. My first freshener is down to a quart twice a day as we are heading into hrer 7th month of milking and it's almost buck time again! Man I need to coordinate the timing of breeding--I hate the thought of buyng cow's milk again.

    Good luck!

    Vanessa
     

  3. xoxoGOATSxoxo

    xoxoGOATSxoxo when in doubt, mumble.

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    Don't even bother getting a buck, unless their is absolutly nobody around with a decent dairy buck. He just wouldn't be worth it for 2 does.

    Good luck!! :)
     
  4. TexCountryWoman

    TexCountryWoman Gig'em

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    I recommend LaManchas as they are heat toleramt and give alot of milk. My first freheners gave over a gallon a day when milked twice a day. I went to once a day milkings and now get about 3 quarts from each goat per milking. From my older Lamanchas, I get about 1 1/2 gallons a day. Lamanchas are a quiet gentle breed and do well under stessful conditions.

    If you just do not like the look of earless goats, then Nubians are also a good choice for the South. They give good creamy milk though perhaps not as much or for as long. Some lines will surpass many of other breeds though. Nubians can be lound and bossy. They are beautiful and easy to find.

    For just two does, I would not get a buck, really, I wouldn't. They are just not worth the trouble. You will only need their service for a few minutes once a year for two does and the rest of the time, you will have a buck to contend with that will just get bigger and stronger and need his own pen and shed. He may also require a companion wether if he is far away and gets to hollering because he is lonely or seems depressed for lack of a friend.

    Borrow a healthy buck or take your does to a buck at a reputable farm for the one time a year they need breeding.

    If, on the other hand, you are very remote, or really want a closed herd without other goats coming or going, or don't have a way to get your goats to another farm, then get a buck. Your choice. But make sure you build a STRONG pen prior to his arrival. Take the time to do it right before you get him. And remember, it costs the same to feed and house a poor buck as it does a superior buck. So get the absolutely best buck you can afford. He is half your herd and he is a very important addition to your herd.
     
  5. southrngardngal

    southrngardngal Well-Known Member

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    Joined:
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    Location:
    Philadelphia, Mississippi
    I don't know anyone around here that has pure breed goats/registered goats. That is why we were thinking of getting a buck.

    There are some people around with mixed breeds but like I mentioned in the OP, we would like to be able to sell to 4-H members who are interested in raising goats. Of course, we won't be basing our livelihood on this. LOL

    Thanks for the information. I have read up on nubians but don't know anything about LaManchas.

    There is another breed that I have seen that some people in North Mississippi own and that is Saneen (sp). Are any of you familar with this breed?

    I appreciate the information. I will be checking around to see if there are any goat owners in this area but if NAIS goes through I really rather not be moving any of my animals if I can help it.

    Thanks again.

    Jan
     
  6. vancom

    vancom Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Middle Tennessee
    We are planning on a buck because 1) it's an hour each way to the nearest good bucks; 2) we have the room for one (and we'll put the wethers with him) and 3) we are to the point where we want 4-5 does to breed each year. We are aiming high so we are willing to spend the money as we use goat milk for many uses and need that many does and thus that many does serviced each year.

    We thought about AI but a buck is easier--and I agree that if you want a herdsire you better be willing to look and around and choose carefully. I have seen $100 bucks and $1500 bucks and there's a big difference alright!

    Vanessa
    near Nashville