Planning for 2007 - a question for you

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by donsgal, Nov 24, 2006.

  1. donsgal

    donsgal Nohoa Homestead

    Messages:
    5,398
    Joined:
    May 2, 2005
    Location:
    SW Missouri near Branson (Cape Fair)
    What is the weirdest thing you grow in your garden?

    I am thinking of putting in a few medlars and maybe some maca or yacon (south american tubers). I'm also thinking about some grain amaranth or quinoa. I want to try some different things in 2007.

    donsgal
     
  2. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,576
    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2004
    Location:
    Canada
    not really weird, but different from the original.

    daikon radish (grows 3 ft. big)
    chiogga beets
    rainbow chard
    ghost white skinned pumpkins
    green with grey striped buttercup squash
    purple asparagus
    red and yellow alpine strawberries (mignonette is one variety)
    amaranth (the domestic cultivar of pigweed)
    purslane
    new zealand spinach (not that uncommon, but different)
    japanese greens (can't remember the name, peppery taste)
    rutabagas for sure (Laurentian Swede turnips)
    Burpee yellow beets (don't bleed like red beets)
    gherkin cukes (India strain)
    red scallions
    schonorozea (sp?) ....tastes like oyster
    garden huckleberry
    yellow raspberries
     

  3. zealot

    zealot Soli Deo Gloria

    Messages:
    692
    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2006
    Location:
    SW Missouri
    I suppose the weirdest thing I have grown would be mouse melons (Melothria scabra), which I grew against a fence while living at the previous place.
     
  4. culpeper

    culpeper Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,187
    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2002
    Location:
    Australia
    Well, I don't think they're weird - just different!

    kang kong
    bok choi
    warrigal greens
    mushroom plant (NOT mushrooms, but a herb)

    and a whole host of 'unusual' herbs like liquorice, patchouli, arrowroot, galangal, turmeric, kaffir lime, just to name a very few in my all-herb garden - which also has medicinal herbs in it like agrimony and chaste-tree.
     
  5. Charleen

    Charleen www.HarperHillFarm.com Supporter

    Messages:
    3,087
    Joined:
    May 12, 2002
    Location:
    Western NY
    donsgal - are you taking maca that you're interested in growing it? I've recently heard good things about it and was considering adding it my perimenopausal arsenal of supplements.

    As for some unusual things to plant next year - we're received some heirloom seeds from my cousin who is a Horticulture Research Specialist at the Experiment Station at Cornell - corn, pole beans. Looking forward to adding a few more heirlooms to our usual list.

    We normally, each year, add a new one, eliminate a previous one for each type of veg.
     
  6. LagoVistaFarm

    LagoVistaFarm Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    912
    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2006
    Cardoons were new for us this year.
     
  7. rocket

    rocket Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    400
    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2005
    Location:
    Sacramento, CA
    I'm trying Mizuna this winter. It's really not weird, but it's new to me. And it's fantastic! It germinated well and grew quickly. It's good as a cooked or stir-fry green and makes a nice salad green too.
     
  8. MeanDean

    MeanDean that geeky admin guy

    Messages:
    2,623
    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2002
    Location:
    the Peak of good living
    I don't plan for the next year - the DW does - which explains why I'll be planting yet more bulbs next weekend!-)
     
  9. jnap31

    jnap31 garden guy

    Messages:
    3,516
    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2005
    Location:
    AR (ozarks)
    I have some medlar seeds I am going to grow also, I find them tasty ate quite a few in Kosovo. donsgal seach medlars on this site, I started a thread about them a few weeks ago, I think no one had heard of them.
     
  10. jen74145

    jen74145 Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    6,375
    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2006
    Location:
    Northern California
    Hmm... so far the strangest thing on the list is soapwort. Growing amaranth, millet, and all sorts of seed plant for my hens... and the theory is, if it isn't a heirloom, it isn't in my garden.
    Nothing against those who go the hybrid route, just not for me. ;)

    Ooh wait! The bushel gourds I'm growing so I'll have natural containers for my small winter squash! So excited about those, can't believe they slipped my mind.
     
  11. Spinner

    Spinner Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    6,727
    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2003
    I grow heirlooms also. Do you have enough bushel gourd seeds to trade or sell some of them? I don't have anything that would be considered weird, just the normal garden stuff.
     
  12. zealot

    zealot Soli Deo Gloria

    Messages:
    692
    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2006
    Location:
    SW Missouri
    By the way, Donsgal, the medlar is a TREE.
     
  13. donsgal

    donsgal Nohoa Homestead

    Messages:
    5,398
    Joined:
    May 2, 2005
    Location:
    SW Missouri near Branson (Cape Fair)
    Right you are! I guess I should have expanded that to garden and orchard. :rolleyes: Anyway, I hope that I can find a source for seedlings as I have not had very good luck at growing things from seed (at least last year I didn't!)

    Jnap31, if you have any "extra" seedlings available once you get your medlars started, maybe we can work out something.

    Do they really taste like applesauce with cinnamon in it?

    Thanks for all the great ideas, everybody!

    donsgal
     
  14. RoseGarden

    RoseGarden Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,492
    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2005
    Location:
    Southeast
    Sugarcane, which is currently flopped over and about 15 ft. long! Going to plant red grain amaranth because it does so well and everyone asks what in the world it is. Imagine a monster celosia. Going to plant some kind of grain millet for the hens, want to try some of those 'Mexican gherkins' that all the catalogs are hawking. Have had them before down by the border, where they are a wild plant. Maybe some real gherkins, too. Going to plant a few cotton seeds, too, just for fun. I love the odd and unusual members of the plant kindgom.
     
  15. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    14,801
    Joined:
    May 9, 2002
    Location:
    South Central Wisconsin
    Medlar propagation is by grafting onto suitable rootstock. Seeds may take several years to germinate and the eventual fruit produced will be unlike the original.

    Martin