pit bull attacked our jersey, or singin' the new farm blues

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by farmy, Nov 30, 2003.

  1. farmy

    farmy Well-Known Member

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    We've been on our new farm about three weeks now. This past week, the frost free pump froze solid, the tractor broke, we got a skunk in the milk room, and the roof tore off one of the barns. Chalk it all up to the stuff that happens when you take over a farm that's been neglected for years. We were handling it all as it came. Then, yesterday, the tenants' dogs, led by a big male pit bull, attacked our Jersey. I've never seen a living animal look worse than she does right now. They tore both her ears right off, leaving gory, messed up stumps, punctured her eye and nose, lacerated her haunches, legs, and her udder. Just looking at her right now makes me cry. She's the sweetest cow in the world. She stood for hand milking last night after all this without a kick. The vet says she'll most likely be fine, she just won't win any beauty contests without ears. The tenants felt terrible and shot all three of their dogs, even though we told them we didn't want them put down, just put off the farm. They said they felt like they couldn't trust the dogs anymore, after seeing our poor cow, and didn't want to foist the responsibility off on someone else. The pit bull's owner really loved him, and I could see how hard it was for him. They're good neighbors, despite this mess. All the dogs had been raised around cows, and there wasn't any reason not to trust them, except that he's a pit bull. I never say this sort of thing about a breed, since I believe every individual dog is different, but the damage a pit bull can do in a matter of minutes is so scary, I won't ever let one around my livestock or my family again. Just needed to share this with you all, as we're feeling pretty down about all of it.
    -Kristin
     
  2. well, nothing wrong with your neighbors; they stepped up to the plate and took responsibility. My understanding is that the pit bull is descended from the dogs that were used in "bull baiting', its in their blood to try to take down a cow. Sorry to hear about this.
     

  3. farmmaid

    farmmaid Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Your neighbors appear to be good people, not always the case in situations like this...They did the right thing! Keep wounds clean and meds in her, she sounds like a "keeper". Will be thinking about all of you...Joan
     
  4. You have responsable neighbours- but be aware the situation will arise again, and that is why farmers shoot any stray dogs on their property.
    Another point-it is likely in the dog;s breeding and temperament to go after cattle- just as some breeds instinctively work with sheep.That is a valid reason for people in the country [ or anywhere for that fact] to choose breeds that at least have genetic tendencies to do the job they are bred for.Some breeds are better watch dogs, others are better family dogs, others are tracking, retrievers,pointers etc.Not a bad thing to keep in mind when choosing a dog.
    Nobody wants to put a dog down, so some care in choosing the breed to match the habitat or desired use can make at least the chances of compatability better.
     
  5. another point- that could of been a child, not your cow.
     
  6. Ann-NWIowa

    Ann-NWIowa Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Almost any breed of dog will take down (or try to) an animal when they start running in packs. We had this happen with ranch dogs and pets in Wyoming. Two well trained blue heelers led the pack of four or five dogs including our son's mutt. They worried the neighbors sheep and took down some 4-H sheep on the ranch. The owner of the blue heelers was in a real snit and blamed the "pets" and said we had to shoot them. I told him when he shot his blue heelers the next bullet could be for our dog. We all kept our dogs confined thereafter.
     
  7. bgak47

    bgak47 Well-Known Member

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    Dogs should not be allowed to run free, no matter how much land you have or what breed they are. All dogs are only a little bit away from their wild origins,& when they run in packs instinct takes over. The most gentle family dog can become a livestock killer when in a pack. Sort of like the Mob mentality in humans. I don't like generalisations about breeds of dogs. Any dog is an individual & is only as good or bad as it's master makes it. Train your dogs & confine them or keep them under your personal control.
     
  8. kathy H

    kathy H kathyh

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    bgak47 said it right. Any dog not watched can become trouble! Our pitbull spent years going to convalescent homes in the share a pet program she was a great dog ,But we were responsible owners. Sorry your cow got hurt. Was the pit nuetered? hopefully the next dogs your neighbors get will be watched better.Give your cow lots of love and hopefully she will be fine, thank goodness she wasnt killed.
     
  9. diane

    diane Well-Known Member

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    Sorry to hear of your ordeal!! Our experience is that the sweetest of dogs can become horrors if allowed to run in a pack. I hope that your cow continues to improve and that the neighborhood consider the situation as a forewarning of what could have been an attack on a child.
     
  10. Cara

    Cara Well-Known Member

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    I am so sorry this happened. Your poor cow....I hope she heals up alright. Also hope that things start lookin' up for you and your new farm. Keep your chin up!
     
  11. TedH71

    TedH71 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Actually neutering a pit bull still doesn't affect his/her ability to do the work he/she was bred to do. I used to raise and sell registered pits for wild hog catching work. Spaying/neutering doesn't work for pits like it would in other breeds. It's bred in them. Alot of herding breeds still will herd even if they're spayed..same thing with terriers. I have to keep an eye on my dacshund/schanuzer cross pup because she will not take any crap from a horse or a cow and isn't afraid of them. As a matter of fact she went for a horse's nose simply bec he tried to bite her! The horse tried to stomp her while I was trying to grab her and hollering at her to stop. After that, she stayed on the LEASH!

    Ted
     
  12. kathy H

    kathy H kathyh

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    Good point ted but I think it makes a calmer dog and less apt to want to chalange you when the hormones kick in.
     
  13. comfortablynumb

    comfortablynumb Well-Known Member

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    pit bulls are agressive, by nature and breeding. nurture and environment cannot take that away, you cant defete genetics. you cant nurture the hunter out of the wolf, and you cant love the killer out of a pitt bull. I know many of these dogs are,very lovy and sweet tempered BUT they were bred and geneticly selected for killing, it is thier nature. many breeds are like this, the breeds bred as war dogs, gaurds and sport killers.
    you neighbors did the right thing, and its great you all get along well. In the future NEVER have ANYTHING to do with a pitt bull unless its pulling a trigger. It is an outdated breed that serves no use on a farm or a family. The genetics should be preserved, you never know why you will need a breed in the future, BUT... I would classyfy them in the same list as keeping a tiger or a wolf in captivity.... its a potentially dangerous dog, by reason of its instinct and breeding.
    There are other breeds that make just a good an attck/gaurd dog that does not posses a killers instinct.
    The only reason you would posses a dog that is so large and srong and agressive is as a guard or an attacker, and your target is, quite frankly not cows, its other human beings. A pack of 3 large poodles can rip up a man as well as one pitt bulll, and the agression isnt there. If your thinking of owning a pitt bull, consider 2 shepards or a pair of other breed dog.
    Pitt bulls are BAD NEWS. So many kids around here get killed or mauled by "pet bulls" or by some ones bull thats jumped a fence. Unlike most dogs, the PB is bold and agressive alone, having a pack doesnt make them worse, although it doesnt help.
    just like some people are geneticly an azzhole or a killer, it is no different with dogs. before you blindly by a breed research the breed, see why it was bred and what its intended job was. it may save you a lot of heartache and pain.
     
  14. bgak47

    bgak47 Well-Known Member

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    Does anyone remember ''Petey'', the dog in The Little Rascals ? He was a pitt bull. There was a time in the 1920s & 1930s when pitt bulls were the most popular breed in America for family pets. They're loyal & protective, but they are NOT inherently evil,any more than people are. I aggree that certain breeds are predisposed to certain types of behavior, but behavior CAN be modified by training & nurturing. The finest bird dog, with the best pedigree,won't be able to hunt without proper training. Training is what separates good dogs from curs, & it is up to their owners to eliminate bad behavior. The smartest pup in the world has to be trained not to poop in the house. I think that the problem with pitts & many other breeds,is that they become popular & are bred indiscriminately for money, without regard for health or temperament,but the real problem is the fact that too many people have false expectations about dogs. Too many people think that they can get a certain breed of dog & expect a certain type of behavior from it, with no thought about their responsibility to TRAIN it. Dogs are Man's Best Friend, but it is a 2 way street, & we have to be a friend to them by teaching them the best ways to get along with us.
     
  15. TedH71

    TedH71 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    :haha: I've raised pits for awhile....some of my friends have been breeding them far longer than I have. Comfortably numb has bought into the pit bull myths. Keep in mind, the vast majority of the pits out there were probably raised and bred by gangbangers and left outside. Any dog that's left outside on a chain 24/7 will develop mental problems mainly because they have to defend theirselves and are left without any training. They bark, dig, howl, etc to demostrate their wanting to be with the pack. Keep in mind, pits are dominant dogs and require you to be the alpha at ALL times! They're not dogs you can leave in the backyard. As a matter of fact, I've never allowed my pits to be in the yard without me watching because they can get stolen. I've had pups stolen from me three times by a snot nosed kid who sold them for $500 each without papers for fighting purposes! I had cops sent in on the kid and his family but couldn't get any evidence but they now know he's into dog fighting.

    Ted
     
  16. bgak47

    bgak47 Well-Known Member

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    Well,dog fighting is the main reason that pitt bulls are seen as a threat. Dogs that fight HAVE TO BE TRAINED to FIGHT!
     
  17. TedH71

    TedH71 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Reality check guys. Dogs don't have to be trained to fight if it's bred into them. If a dog has to be encouraged to fight, they're not fighters by nature. Keep in mind, my dogs aren't dog aggressive and I breed AWAY from that goal for dog friendly dogs that can get along with other dogs on a hunt which is valuable because bay and find dogs are worth lots of money while the catch dog is the warrior that goes in and catch 'em on the ear. A hog hunter will put down a dog that fights with his strike/bay dogs without question because of this reason. Catch dogs don't need training, period!

    Ted
     
  18. comfortablynumb

    comfortablynumb Well-Known Member

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    believe what you like... they are your kids, not mine.
    Ive seen the family pitts thing as recently as last summer, one was playing with 2 kids, brought up from a pups, lovely home, kind people. perfect environment. the pitt was playing in the fenced yard with these 2 little kids.. a another lill kid passed by outside the fence on the street, stumbled and fell, and the pitts snapped to action, over the fence and mauled the kid half to death. the kid didnt scare them, the dogs knew the kid. they ignored him till he fell, then instinct took over. A good friend of mine ran over and beat the dogs off the kid with HER fists and the pits ran back to thier yard. they didnt attack the adult who was being agressive, or the kids in the yard... they intentionally attacked the lil kid that fell on the street.

    again.. these wasnt anything but a raised from a weened pup loved yo death slobbering babies... very nice dogs i will say freely. and timid, they never to my witness ever groweled at anyone.

    explain why the action of the lil kid on the street falling down triggered an attack?

    the instinct no matter how hidden is still there, its not just pitts, its a lot of breeds.
    Not putting anyone down or picking a fight, but if you want to play with your kids life go ahead.... is a hip breed of dog worth it?

    besides...we put down millions of dogs every year for lack of homes, why, besides for the money would you breed MORE?
    its popular
    its cool
    its a money maker.

    Nothing wrong with making money.... unless your a drug dealer right?
    My niece breeds dogs... makes good cash too. when you say"adopt a shelter dog" she sais like most do "oh but these dogs are purebreds! they arent like those shelter dogs"
    yea shes right.. they arent like the dogs at the shelter... the dogs at the shelter are much better. :D

    In the end, it is an individual choice, own a pitt, roll the dice.
     
  19. I make no claim of knowing breeds, but something seems pretty simple to me- if you want to go duck hunting - you buy a lab or a similardog bred for those instincts.Ifyou want a pointer , you buy a pointer.Ifyou want a sheep dog- you buy a sheep dog.Now if you want a guard dog- you buy a dog with very territorial instincts, breeds known for that.You don't go buying guard dogs for hunting, and you don't go buying defense dogs for herding,so why have a dogthatsimply isn't bred for what you want to do.Personally- I will shoot any pitbull on my property; I'm sure as heck not going to wait until he attacks my kid to find out if he's friendly or not.
    Again- I go back to my farmer friends- they shoot any and all stray dogs on their property.Period.No questions asked..
     
  20. Oxankle

    Oxankle Well-Known Member

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    Anyone catch the news this morning? Three pits killed a woman feeding her horses, attacked her husband when he went looking for her. The dogs then attacked a neigbor whose son shot and killed all three.

    Say what you will; owning a pit is like playing with a loaded pistol. Same for Dobes and Rotts. Neighbor here raised a Rott from a pup with his kids. Dog got mature and bit the smaller child TWICE before the neighbor put him down.

    Ox