Pioneer Maid Cookstove

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by RockyRooster, Jun 26, 2006.

  1. RockyRooster

    RockyRooster Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    335
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2006
    Location:
    Virginia
    Can someone please tell me what an internal flue damper is? Does this mean that I wouldnt have to put a flue going outside of house? :help:


    http://www.woodstoves.net/pioneer2.htm

    Pioneer Maid Cookstove
    Over night burn
    The Pioneer Maid easily holds a fire all night or longer, no fire to kindle in the morning just turn the stove on!

    Fingertip Control
    The Pioneer Maid offers a degree of control undreamed of by grandmother. A simple twist of the twin air intake and the fire leaps to life. A twist in the reverse direction and it is almost instantly dampered down.

    Large Firebox
    The large size of the firebox permits stoking the fire for longer periods, as well as cutting down on splitting of wood. The firebox is top loading only through the lid on the cooktop.

    Quality Lining
    The refractory brick liner in the firebox is thicker and stronger, custom molded to our specifications.

    Welded Construction
    Most cookstoves are built of such lightweight materials that they need to be held together with screws, in contrast the Pioneer Maid is welded steel throughout for a lifetime of trouble free maintenance.

    Smooth Top
    A single piece top with only 2 large 11 inch lids make cleaning the top easier.






    Down Draft Efficiency
    For years cookstoves have been notoriously inefficient. Not so the Pioneer Maid. Users report cutting there fuel consumption up to one-half.

    Roomy Oven
    The oven not only heats quickly, it holds an even heat for longer periods of time, and is easily controlled, but has a capacity for 8 loaves of bread.

    Porcelain Finish
    The entire stove exterior is clad in baked on porcelain for better looks and easier cleaning.

    A Space Heater
    The Pioneer Maid doubles as a space heater when the oven door is open, thus converting the oven into a ready made heat exchanger, unbelievably efficient. Will heat approximately 2,000 square feet.

    High Back And Shell
    A high back and sturdy shelf provide convenient storage for the items you like to have handy when cooking and baking.

    Warming Closet
    An optional warming closet also available to keep food warm until meal time. 10" x 10" x length of stove.

    Durable Stainless Steel
    Almost 50% of the stove body itself (excluding the top) is made of stainless material that should never rust or corrode.

    Standard Features
    In addition to the features no other cookstove can match, the Pioneer Maid offers many of the standard ones as well, such as an ash pan for easy clean out, stay cool wooden handles and knobs and handles, black porcelain finish, spring-loaded oven door, oven thermostat, internal flue damper, and optional hot water coil and a reservoir (capacity 10 U.S. gallons).

    Specifications: With Reservoir Without Reservoir
    Dimensions
    Length 52" 43"
    Width 28 ½ " 28 ½ "
    Height 53 ½ " 51 ½ "
    Cooking Surface
    Length 50" 41"
    Width 22 ½ " 22 ½ "
    Height 32 ½ " 32 ½ "
    Oven Dimensions
    Depth 22" 22"
    Width 19 ½ " 19 ½ "
    Height 13" 13"

    Fire Box Dimensions With Reservoir Without Reservoir
    Length 18 ½ " 18 ½ "
    Width 11 ½ " 11 ½ "
    Depth 18 ½ " 18 ½ "
    Flue
    Size Round 7" 7"
    Location rear rear
    Shipping
    Weight 623 lb.. 570 lb..
    Approximate
    Area Heated 2,000 sq. ft 2,000 sq. ft


    Pioneer Maid Cookstove Pricing (please call or email for a shipping quote. Please state your city, state and zip code, along with the model of the stove)

    Prices
    Stove with Shelf Only $1,815
    Stove with Warming Closet $1,955
    Stove with Water Reservoir $1,965
    Stove with Water Reservoir and Warming Closet $2,105
     
  2. featherbottom

    featherbottom Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    224
    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2004

  3. Freeholder

    Freeholder Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,665
    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2004
    Yes, you must have a flue going outside the house, with any wood-burning stove. The internal flue damper mentioned is just as dbthomas said, inside the flue (and a wood cookstove will also have flues to direct hot air around the oven, or send it straight out the flue so the oven doesn't heat up).

    Kathleen
     
  4. Sharon

    Sharon Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    416
    Joined:
    May 11, 2002
    Location:
    South Central Virginia
    I've had a Pioneer Maid for 7 years. I LOVE it. It has a giant oven and firebox. It also holds 11 gallons of water in the reservoir (my husband attached a spigot to it, so I have hot running water out of it). I love the warming oven too. It is a very large cookstove, so make sure you have a big kitchen. It is definitely the focal point of the room! It doesn't have any fancy features and I sometimes wish I had gotten a Sweetheart Stove, but then reality kicks in and I'm glad I got the Pioneer Maid. It pretty much heats our whole house too.
     
  5. RockyRooster

    RockyRooster Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    335
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2006
    Location:
    Virginia
    Sharon, does yours have a flue going outside of the house? So, for being so redundant even after the above answers from other posters, but if you click on the link I have you will notice that all the other wood cooking stoves have flues except the Pioneer Maid. And when you look at the specs of the others they mention flue, but not on Pioneer Maid. That is why I am so confused. :help:
     
  6. Sgt.Sausage

    Sgt.Sausage Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    95
    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2006
    I think you're confusing the term "flue" with the chimney and/or stovepipe. They *all* need some sort of exhaust outside -- stovepipe or chimney. You don't want all that nasty smoke, soot, carbon monoxide, and creosote to exhaust inside the house do you? I wouldn't. Even if heavily scrubbed/filtered I wouldn't want the stuff. You need a way to vent outside.

    The flue, in my mind, is the device that connects the stove to the stovepipe/chimney and (optionally) allows you to regulate airflow by opening/closing. Not sure if this is the real definition or something I've just got in my head.

    Either way, it *must* be vented outside. No question about that one.
     
  7. RockyRooster

    RockyRooster Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    335
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2006
    Location:
    Virginia
    Yep, thank you sarge. sometimes i can be so dense. :help: