Pink/Antibiotic question

Discussion in 'Goats' started by Croenan, Feb 3, 2005.

  1. Croenan

    Croenan Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    312
    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2003
    Location:
    Stuart, VA
    Ok..I think one of my does has pinkeye and from reading up, I got some Oxytetracycline or name brand Duramycin 72-200 (I am pretty sure it's the equivalent of LA-200) and now my question is how much, where, SQ or intramusclular and does it HAVE to be injected? She probably weighs close to 60+ pounds, she's a very fat pygmy.

    I washed her eye and although she didn't like the washing, she perked up a bit when I was done, I think it felt good for her. (and I was careful of cleaning well afterwards) I would like to wait until my hubby comes home because I've never given her an injection before, but that means waiting until Saturday AM, do you think that's ok? I also can't really separate her from the herd, although she is quite a loner, I am sure that she is touching community items, so they might get it. I'd rather not treat them unless it's nec, what do you think? No signs of infection on the others yet and she's had it for at least 4 days. (I noticed it 3 days ago, but it was better the last 2 days, and got bad again today)

    Any extra advice would be helpful, I read the posts on this subject, but needed some specifics...I am still a newbie at most treatments.

    Thanks!
    Corrie Ann
    Stuart, VA
     
  2. Jen H

    Jen H Well-Known Member

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    Jun 16, 2004
    Location:
    Washington
    My vet book says tetraycycline ointment in the eye daily for 5-6 days + 1 tetracycline injection intramuscularly. The rest of the herd should have the tetracycline injection to prevent spread.

    There should be dosing directions on the bottle of antibiotic. They'll say to use X ml per Y lbs of body weight. If they don't list goats on the dosing directions, then go with the sheep recommendations.

    Intramuscular injections get into the system quicker than subqutaneous (sp?) ones do. That's why you generally give antibiotics IM, so they go to work faster. Can you put a hook into one of the barn walls to tie her to so she stays put while you give the shot? That's what I do when I trim hooves, take temperatures, give shots... anything I know they won't like.

    If you can't give her the injection solo, then at least get the tetracycline ointment into her eye right away. Pink eye can lead to blindness, so she really does need the injection plus the ointment.

    The easiest muscle to find on the goat is the rump - pull one of the back legs back and out a bit and the muscle will bulge. The needle goes into the middle of the bulge. This can cause them to limp, so most people use the muscle at the base of the neck, where the neck meets the shoulders. Feel around there and you'll find the muscle I'm talking about.

    The rest of the herd may not be showing signs of infection, but that doesn't mean they don't have the germs. Animals can carry this without being actually sick, and pink eye is really contagious.

    In addition to the tetracycline ointment (there will be dosing directions on the tube), I'd rinse her eyes out at least once a day. Probably right before applying the ointment. The saline solution they sell for contact lens wearers works really well for this - it's a nice focused stream and the solution is just about right so it won't sting.

    Good luck with this!
     

  3. cntrymomof4

    cntrymomof4 Member

    Messages:
    17
    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2003
    I have used tetraycycline ointment (or just good ole Neosporine works just as good, a vet told me that) , I have also used LA 200 directly into the eye, but the best cure I have found is if you have a goat in milk, squirt milk into the infected eye! The milk carries all of the antibodies for anything that might be on your land. Works like a charm everytime for us!!

    nicole