Pine logs for goat barn

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by sancraft, Jan 8, 2005.

  1. sancraft

    sancraft Well-Known Member

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    We will start clearing our land next weekend. The back section in 6 yr. old planted pine. That is the area we are clearing. The trees are small, about 12-16 ft. tall and about 6-7 inches in diameter. I want to use them to build a goat barn and possibly a chicken coop. I was thinking of dry stacking them using a vertical log every 6 ft to nai into. Will this work? Should I try and peel the logs first or just let the goats eat if off?
     
  2. Mr. Dot

    Mr. Dot Well-Known Member

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    Howdy
    All of my goat sheds are built more-or-less in this manner. Early on I tried shaving all the poles but eventually gave up owing to the time available. The obvious advantage to shaving is that you eliminate hiding places for bugs and it allows the wood to dry out well - on the other hand, the goats enjoy chewing on what they can reach. Our climate is DRY and as long as my structures are covered from rain/snow they seem to hold up real well and have that Ma & Pa Kettle look that suits me.
     

  3. sancraft

    sancraft Well-Known Member

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    Thanks. That's what I'll do then.
     
  4. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    What a timely question :) I am right now redoing my bucks fence, why, because we used stupid things in the beginning like landscape timbers and creasote posts for end posts, pine trees off our property for timber framing the buck barn....Did you read that he said his climate is dry? Yes for horizontal framing using your own timbers is fine, all my rafters are fine, but anything touching the ground is rotted and the buck pen is maybe 12 years old, want to do this all again in 12 years? My buck barn is literally floating, there is no solid wood left in the ground. Since it is not a project I have budgeted for this year, I have way better wants than that :) husband is driving metal posts all around it to anchor it (think hurricanes and tornados), until we get around to redoing it, and we are putting up metal corner posts, metal T posts and cattle panels to redo the fencing. Soon the only wood on the place is going to be the trees :) Vicki
     
  5. tyusclan

    tyusclan Well-Known Member

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    Vicki is right. For walls or bracing they will be fine. But anything in or touching the ground needs to pressure treated or it won't last very long.
     
  6. Mr. Dot

    Mr. Dot Well-Known Member

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    The pine posts of my structures are all set on concrete blocks and are doing fine. The weight of the building keeps all in place (so far) as we don't have the pleasure of hurricanes or tornadic winds out this way. Most (there are some types of trees that can hold up in the ground as fence posts - can't remember right now what they are but they sure don't grow around here) untreated wood touching soil will have a short life span not to mention invite termites and such. Another wiggly pleasure we are mostly short of here. What I do put in the ground is pressure treated as recommended above.
    Have fun making your barn and coop.
     
  7. sancraft

    sancraft Well-Known Member

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    I was thinking of a double course of concret block with the first course 3/4 countersunk into the ground and the second course cemented to it. That would give a raised floor so they won't flood out inside during a heavy rain. Also, I'd use pressure treated wood on the bottom row. I'd cement in the post. My daugher suggested using two post far enough apart to just stack the logs between them and not use any nails. I kind of like that idea. Seems really simple. I want to have a proper barn built in about 3 years. Right now, all money has to go into building a house for us. I'm trying to get some structures up for the animals that will last at least until we can build them something else. If this works, I won't even have to do that.
     
  8. Siryet

    Siryet In Remembrance

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  9. Mr. Dot

    Mr. Dot Well-Known Member

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    Holy moly that's a great site. I see I'll be "save target as"-ing for the next couple of days.
     
  10. sisterpine

    sisterpine Goshen Farm Supporter

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    wow! bunches of stuff i want to build on that site, many thanks!