Pilot Bread (Sailor Boy) for long storage

Discussion in 'Survival & Emergency Preparedness' started by Sourdough, Jul 30, 2012.

  1. Sourdough

    Sourdough Well-Known Member

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    "SAILOR BOY" brand Pilot Bread seems to keep forever. Old time Alaskans buy it by the case. It is baked in New Jersey. Even after it is opened it tastes good for a few years. For a snack I just put three biscuits in a pan and put some cheese & cayenne pepper on top and heat till melted. There is 24 pounds of biscuits in a case. Yummy in the tummy, and keeps forever.

    I have no interest in the company. Burgers, salmon, sundaes top Alaska's favorite cracker: Pilot Bread | Alaska news at adn.com
     
  2. stamphappy

    stamphappy Well-Known Member

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    so....where can you purchase them?

    Amazon has them in a metal can $7.45 for 12 crackers. Are they typically that expensive?
     

  3. Sourdough

    Sourdough Well-Known Member

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  4. stamphappy

    stamphappy Well-Known Member

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    After doing a little bit of digging, it looks like one can order them from SpanAlaska for shipment here to the lower 48 but you need to do a minimum $100 order.

    They have available 12 two pound packages at SpanAlaska for $81.99 before shipping.
     
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  5. joseph97297

    joseph97297 Well-Known Member

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    We ate Pilot Bread when we were living in Alakanuk, would love to get some, but can't see paying 3.50 per pound, would rather spend that on beef and bake some bread.

    They are tasty and the kids loved them. We would order from a company based in Anchorage who would buy and ship the stuff out to the village. The school had an order every month, so we usually piggy backed along with them to cut down shipping.
     
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  6. AngieM2

    AngieM2 Big Front Porch advocate Supporter

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    I cannot find a picture of these. What are they like? Seems they are all purpose from the article sourdough linked to... it does sound interesting.
     
  7. AngieM2

    AngieM2 Big Front Porch advocate Supporter

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  8. AngieM2

    AngieM2 Big Front Porch advocate Supporter

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  9. Limon

    Limon Well-Known Member

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    It's just hardtack. Very simple to make at home, and a lot less expensive than those prices.
     
  10. Sourdough

    Sourdough Well-Known Member

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    SAILOR BOY PILOT BREAD Interbake Foods is also the proud supplier of one-and-only Sailor Boy Pilot Bread. This specialty cracker is well-known in the Northwest United States and Alaska as the favorite “bread” in the bush country of Alaska. Interested in learning more? Please visit the Sailor Boy facebook page. Interested in purchasing Sailor Boy Pilot Bread crackers? Winco stores carry the Sailor Boy Pilot Bread in bulk bins in their stores in California, Nevada, Idaho, Oregon, Utah and Washington State. Span Alaska Sales, located in Monroe, Washington, is a stocking wholesale distributor who specializes in the direct shipment of grocery items. They offer Sailor Boy Pilot Bread and Sailor Boy Yukon Bulk Pilot Bread and will take orders via toll free number 1.800.367.9833. Follow
     
  11. AngieM2

    AngieM2 Big Front Porch advocate Supporter

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    I just checked out facebook and found their page, but what is funnier is the Sailor Boy Pilot Bread Junkies-Anonymous

    there are more photos there.
     
  12. A.T. Hagan

    A.T. Hagan Guest

    Good old hardtack.

    Keeps forever and after a few days of eating it you'll hope it'll be forever before you have to eat it again!

    Look around, "pilots bread" and "ships biscuit" can usually be found pretty much everywhere. Failing that then ordinary old saltine crackers. "Export sodas" can usually be found. The Keebler version comes in a big tin. Vacuum sealed in a jar or bag they may well keep forever.
     
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  13. Pouncer

    Pouncer Well-Known Member

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    I bought a box a few years back, I think the package is buried on the top of my fridge, lol Grew up on it, in part, although we weren't truly Bush living. Add jam, instant snack.

    Not a bad prep, really, they keep for ages unopened.
     
  14. emdeengee

    emdeengee Well-Known Member

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    We buy Purity brand Pilot Biscuits right in our local grocery store. There are the regular ones and the flakey ones - which are easier to chew.

    Hardtack (or hard tack) is a simple type of cracker or biscuit, made from flour, water, and sometimes salt. Inexpensive and long-lasting, it was and is used for sustenance in the absence of perishable foods, commonly during long sea voyages and military campaigns.[1] The name derives from the British sailor slang for food, "tack". It is known by other names such as pilot bread (as rations for ship's pilots[2]), ship's biscuit, shipbiscuit, sea biscuit, sea bread (as rations for sailors) or pejoratively "dog biscuits", "tooth dullers", "sheet iron", "worm castles" or "molar breakers".[3] Australian military personnel know them as ANZAC wafers.

    Army Hardtack Recipe

    Ingredients:
    •4 cups flour (perferably whole wheat)
    •4 teaspoons salt
    •Water (about 2 cups)
    •Pre-heat oven to 375° F
    •Makes about 10 pieces

    Mix the flour and salt together in a bowl. Add just enough water (less than two cups) so that the mixture will stick together, producing a dough that won’t stick to hands, rolling pin or pan. Mix the dough by hand. Roll the dough out, shaping it roughly into a rectangle. Cut into the dough into squares about 3 x 3 inches and ½ inch thick.

    After cutting the squares, press a pattern of four rows of four holes into each square, using a nail or other such object. Do not punch through the dough. The appearance you want is similar to that of a modern saltine cracker. Turn each square over and do the same thing to the other side.

    Place the squares on an ungreased cookie sheet in the oven and bake for 30 minutes. Turn each piece over and bake for another 30 minutes. The crackers should be slightly brown on both sides.

    The fresh crackers are easily broken but as they dry, they harden and assume the consistentency of fired brick.