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Discussion Starter #1
Is there any reason why I couldn't build a house on concrete or treated pole pilings as long as they are well below the frost line and maybe wrapped in greasy tar paper so they don't get jacked out of the ground?

That should be much cheaper than a regular foundation unless I'm missing something.
 
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In the South, the raised floor is used for cooling purposes. The shaded, usually moist, ground under the house actually COOLS the home above it. :)
 

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I worked setting pilings down in Fla. years ago. I never did know what type buildings were going up but the stardard specs. for the jobs were 66,000fpe to infinity.If those specs are in play in your area it'll be expensive. We drove some over 180 feet deep.

Wade
 

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Discussion Starter #7
It looks like that type of foundation would be cheaper and easier for one person to build.

One thing I remember from Alabama is walking into an old house with high ceilings. The house seemed 10 degrees cooler. That makes me wonder if there isn't a way to build an escape for heat in the living area.

I've read about people building a 'dog leg' or roofed open area between the house and garage. It's supposed to create a breeze from the temperature differences.
 

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It looks like that type of foundation would be cheaper and easier for one person to build.

One thing I remember from Alabama is walking into an old house with high ceilings. The house seemed 10 degrees cooler. That makes me wonder if there isn't a way to build an escape for heat in the living area.

I've read about people building a 'dog leg' or roofed open area between the house and garage. It's supposed to create a breeze from the temperature differences.
The dog trot kept the kitchen heat separated from the living area.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dogtrot_house
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I've read that it also created a breeze because of the temperature differences between the sunny side and the shady side of the house.

I still wonder if there is a way of moving the hot air to an area above the ceiling or maybe just an extra tall ceiling.
 
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I've read that it also created a breeze because of the temperature differences between the sunny side and the shady side of the house.

I still wonder if there is a way of moving the hot air to an area above the ceiling or maybe just an extra tall ceiling.
A vaulted ceiling and a cupola with louvers that can be closed off in cooler seasons would work.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
cupola? What's that?
 

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A cupola looks like this
 

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You mostly find a cupola on old barns.
The idea is that heat rises, and as a breeze goes through the cupola, it pulls the heat out and creates kind of a draft effect.
Also helps with ventilation I think.
 

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If you do pilings, driven pilings are less subject to jacking by frost than jetted pilings. I doubt you'll use jetting simply because it doesn't appear you're in a waterfront area. There maybe a small contractor or two in your area that has a pile driving setup. In the area I'm familiar with it was a small company that subcontracted to bulkheaders, house movers and builders.

Check your yellow pages for a house mover, if any, and give them a call if you're trying to find someone that can drive piles. To be cost effective you need to find someone that has older equipment. That eliminates the big outfits in most cases. They don't do small. The mobe/demobe costs alone will stun you.

If you're building on piers, ignore all of the preceding.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I was thinking of just augering the post holes followed by some concrete in the bottom and then set the posts after wrapping them in greasy tar paper. Then the holes could be back filled with gravel.

I think that you'd want to keep the hot air contained to prevent the draft from just pulling new hot air into the house. Maybe a sealed cupola to give the hot air a place to go but not allow it to pull outside air behind it. That high ceiling seemed to do that because on the floor it was relatively cool compared to outside but I'll bet near the ceiling it was much hotter.

Is it possible that temperature change isn't uniform from the floor to the ceiling?
 

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What's the difference between a pier and a piling?

I've been thinking of digging holes for sonotubes, and filling concrete in with a treated timber that goes all the way up to the top of the house.
 
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